lower brule

anonymous asked:

too faced chocolate bar combos?

LOOK 1: Salted Caramel

  • Inner Corner: “White Chocolate”
  • First Half of the Lid: “Marzipan”
  • Second Half of the Lid: “Hazlenut”
  • Crease / Lower Lash Line: “Salted Caramel”
  • Outer V: “Semi-Sweet”

LOOK 2: Mardi Gras

  • Inner Corner: “Champagne Truffle”
  • First Half of the Lid: “Strawberry Bon Bon”
  • Second Half of the Lid: “Creme Brulee”
  • Crease / Lower Lash Line: “Milk Chocolate”
  • Outer V: “Candied Violet”

LOOK 3: Jungle Gold & Green

  • Inner Corner: “White Chocolate”
  • First Half of the Lid: “Creme Brulee”
  • Second Half of the Lid: “Gilded Ganache”
  • Crease / Lower Lash Line: “Semi-Sweet”
  • Outer V: “Haute Chocolate”

LOOK 4: Awaiting Autumn

  • Inner Corner: “White Chocolate”
  • First Half of the Lid: “Salted Caramel”
  • Second Half of the Lid: “Amaretto”
  • Crease / Lower Lash Line: “Cherry Cordial”
  • Outer V: “Triple Fudge”
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DAKOTA 38

The largest mass execution in U.S. history occurred on December 26, 1862.

38 Dakota men were executed simultaneously in Mankato, MN (plus 2 more at a later date).

This film follows some of the descendants of the 38 Dakota men on their journey from Lower Brule, SD 330 miles on horseback, returning to Mankato, MN.

With significant help from A Positive Tomorrow, two South Dakota tribes have been awarded Title IV-E Planning Grants, each worth $300,000, to begin planning the infrastructure of their own child and family planning service programs. This is a great victory for the Standing Rock and Oglala Sioux Tribes as they can now create a foster care run by Lakota, for Lakota children.

In addition to this, five other tribes have applied for the Title IV-E federal planning grants this year, and although they have not received such grants, the Lakota People’s Law Project has not lost hope and will be calling an inter-agency meeting with the Department of Justice, the Department of Interior, and Health and Human Services in Washington DC later this month. At this meeting, the funds will be requested so that Lower Brule, Flandreau, Crow Creek, Cheyenne River, and Yankton tribes can begin the process towards the creation of their own foster care system.

The Lakota People’s Law Project is grateful to all those who have been involved with this project. We have crossed a major milestone in our journey towards a more sovereign Lakota nation.