low wage worker

Gentle witch little things

Simple things you can do to bring more love and positivity into the world:

  • enchant the bus or train you’re on, so that everybody has a pleasant day or a safe travel home
  • paint protective sigils in the misty windows of buses or shops when it rains, and leave words of encouragement and praise on public bathrooms’ mirrors
  • bless passing ambulances and firefighter trucks with speed and safety for their patients/destination
  • wear an enchanted lipstick/gloss for your smile to brighten the day of everybody you meet
  • enchant your spare change so that it gives luck to the beggars you donate it to; they need it, don’t they?
  • actually, just enchant your money, so that retail and low-wage workers can have a better day when they serve you
  • leave blessed acorns and harmless trinkets in various places like buses or waiting rooms; give other people something to wonder about and make their day, and kids an item to roll in their hands mindlessly
  • bless food and leave it for stray animals; let birds be messangers of hope and miraclous event for everybody that sees them
  • whisper encouragement to trees and grass you pass by; let them know someone cares, someone sees their beauty, and awaits their bloom
  • smile at children and pets; provide them with the positive energy that the world is trying to kill in them
  • leave motivational notes, praise and silly drawings charged with love and hope on post-it notes as you go; they can brighten the day of those that find them
youtube

THE TRUTH ABOUT TRUMPONOMICS

When Donald Trump spoke at Boeing’s factory in North Charleston, South Carolina – unveiling Boeing’s new 787 “Dreamliner” – he congratulated Boeing for building the plane “right here in the great state of South Carolina.“

But that is pure fantasy.

Trump also used the occasion to tout his “America First” economics, stating “our goal as a nation must be to rely less on imports and more on products made here in the U.S.A.”

Trump seems utterly ignorant about global competition – and about what’s really holding back American workers.

Start with Boeing’s Dreamliner itself. It’s not “made in the U.S.A.” It is assembled in the USA. Most of the parts and almost a third of the cost of the entire plane come from overseas.

For example:

The center fuselage and horizontal stabilizers came from Italy.

The aircraft’s landing gears, doors, electrical power conversion system - from France.

The main cabin lighting came from Germany.

The cargo access doors from Sweden.

The lavatories, flight deck interiors, and galleys from Japan.

Many of the engines from the U.K.

The moveable trailing edge of the wings from Canada.

Notably, the foreign companies that made these parts don’t pay their workers low wages. In fact, when you add in the value of health and pension benefits, most of these foreign workers get a better deal than do Boeing’s workers.

These nations also provide most young people with excellent educations and technical training, as well as universally-available health care.

To pay for all this, these countries also impose higher tax rates on their corporations and wealthy individuals than does the United States. And their health, safety, environmental, and labor regulations are stricter.

Not incidentally, they have stronger unions.

So why is so much of Boeing’s Dreamliner coming from these high-wage, high-tax, high-cost places?

Because the parts made by workers in these countries are better, last longer, and are more reliable than parts made anywhere else.

There’s a critical lesson here.

The way to make the American workforce more competitive isn’t to build an economic wall around America.

It’s to invest more in the education and skills of Americans, in on-the-job training, in a healthcare system that reaches more of us. And to give workers a say in their companies through strong unions.

In other words, we get a first-class workforce by investing in the productive capacities of Americans  – and rewarding them with high wages.

Economic nationalism is no substitute for building the competitiveness of American workers.

Rick & Morty new episode leaked script

Rick: Morty we have to go to McDonalds and harass low wage workers over shitty sauce, Morty. We have to make sure their lives are reaaaal garbage, Morty.

Morty: I-I-I don’t know about this, Rick. Don’t those workers work really hard for basically no pay. It’s seems like a really dickish thing to do over some cheap sauce we could just make in two minutes at home.

Rick: They’re gonna squanch up the order, Morty!

Morty: WHAT!?

Rick: They’re gonna completely squanch up the order, Morty! The order’s gonna be fucked! Absolutely squanched. No sauce! Completely squanched and fucked and dead, Morty!

Morty: W-Why didn’t you just say that before, Rick, if I would’ve known they would fuck up our goddamn order and there’s no sauce I would’ve gotten mad way earlier in spite of the fact that these exploited, low wage workers are in no way responsible for the artificial scarcity of the sauce imposed by the upper management of their company that controls sauce distribution.

Rick: That’s right, Morty. Now let’s go fuck over some stressed out workers and make a lot noise or something, Morty, let’s just do it, Morty. Wubba lubba dub! I’m Rick the crazy scientist and fuck poor people.

*Rick & Morty theme plays*

anonymous asked:

what do you think of the failure of minimum wage in seattle? good warning not to try that shit in in ontario imo. it was all predicted by great man milton friedman.

dean baker did a pretty good analysis of why it’s probably not a very good study.

This finding was quickly picked up in every major news outlet. While some, notably the New York Times, reported the finding with appropriate cautions, others (e.g. here, here, here, here, and here) were nearly gleeful at the idea that workers in Seattle were losing their jobs. Most of the reporting ignored the fact that the same week a team of researchers from Berkeley produced an analysis using a very similar methodology that found no statistically significant impact on employment.

There are important differences in the studies. The Berkeley study follows much prior research and only looks at the restaurant industry, a major employer of low wage workers. The University of Washington NBER paper looked at all workers getting paid less than $19 an hour. It also had two additional quarters of data. However, the Washington study also excluded the roughly 40 percent of the workforce that worked at multi-site employers (think Starbucks and McDonald’s).

In other words, it it not obvious that the Washington study is the “better” analysis. The Berkeley team has produced much of the cutting edge research on the minimum wage over the last fifteen years. I doubt that many of the reporters touting the Washington study would be able to explain why it is a better analysis of the impact of Seattle’s minimum wage hikes.

duncanoa-blog  asked:

Why do businesses have dress codes?

Classism. The whole idea that we have to “look right” is a holdover from what capitalism evolved from in the first place. It was, and still is, a short hand to tell who the serfs and the nobles are - or in the case, the hourly and the salaried workers.

Artificial scarcity is one of the means by which they enforce this. “Good” clothes are priced out of range of low wage workers, so even when they do have the liberty to wear as much and want to, they are often not able to afford it. A country club that requires a fancy suit to enter is going to be largely out of access to most low wage workers.

This applies to both employees of a place and to guests of a place.

Capitalism further expands the idea, however, by turning employees into branding. There is absolutely no functional reason why, say, a retail cashier couldn’t wear a comfortable dress. It does not hinder their job in any way, and no one needs them to wear a name tag to know that if they are standing at a register with the light on that they are there to check you out.

When you look at corporate structure you can see a direct line between the lowest wage workers’ clothes and the highest wage workers’ clothes. Some of that does come from safety concerns - steel toed boots for construction workers, for example - but many people find sturdy boots hella more comfortable than oxfords. Even so, when was the last time a CEO wore steel toed boots?

This applies mostly to workers of a place.

There’s also racism involved. We see this often in the way specific POC hair styles are banned to workers, and how certain styles are banned to guests. What your hair looks like doesn’t affect most, if any, jobs. It also doesn’t affect the vast majority of other guests. But you can ban dreadlocks on account of white matted hair being dirty, and you successfully lock out a healthy style for POC. It also allows people to demand conformity to a different social standard - such as requiring flattened / straightened hair - that reinforces the model minority myth.

This applies to both employees of a place and guests of a place.

There’s a lot more nuance to how racism affects this stuff that I just don’t have a frame of reference for, and if you’re interested in learning more I highly recommenced POC activists and social theorists bc they can explain more than just the basics as well as more accurately describe how classism, racism, and capitalism all go hand in hand.

[EDIT: please see this post regarding conflating black women’s marginalization with the marginalizations experienced by other POC.]

huffingtonpost.com
Iowa Republicans Pass Heartless Minimum Wage Rollback
It's the first time that a state has nullified local minimum wage ordinances that have already taken effect.

In an appalling move to keep low-wage workers locked in poverty, the Iowa legislature this week gave final approval to a bill that reverses local minimum wage increases already approved in several counties and bans cities and counties from setting any wage and benefit standards.  It is the first time that a state has nullified local minimum wage ordinances that had already taken effect and forced jurisdictions to lower minimum wage rates that had previously been raised.

For the struggling workers and families harmed so directly by these lawmakers ― these pawns of the rich and of powerful business interests ― it is troubling to realize that there are elected “leaders” who would be so singularly devoted to ensuring that they stayed poor.

This is literally stealing from the poor to give to the rich. This is beyond abhorrent. These representatives need to be voted out.

Witch Things

Simple things you can do to bring more love and positivity into the world: 

 • enchant the bus or train you’re on, so that everybody has a pleasant day or a safe travel home 

• paint protective sigils in the misty windows of buses or shops when it rains, and leave words of encouragement and praise on public bathrooms’ mirrors bless passing ambulances and firefighter trucks with speed and safety for their patients/destination wear an enchanted lipstick/gloss for your smile to brighten the day of everybody you meet enchant your spare change so that it gives luck to the beggars you donate it to; they need it, don’t they? actually, just enchant your money, so that retail and low-wage workers can have a better day when they serve you 

• leave blessed acorns and harmless trinkets in various places like buses or waiting rooms; give other people something to wonder about and make their day, and kids an item to roll in their hands mindlessly 

• bless food and leave it for stray animals; let birds be messangers of hope and miraclous event for everybody that sees them whisper encouragement to trees and grass you pass by; let them know someone cares, someone sees their beauty, and awaits their bloom 

• smile at children and pets; provide them with the positive energy that the world is trying to kill in them 

• leave motivational notes, praise and silly drawings charged with love and hope on post-it notes as you go; they can brighten the day of those that find them

anonymous asked:

I don't believe the construction of minimum wage was meant to provide funds for fun stuff. Also, in a way, a low minimum wage is helping fight male and female stereotypes. With a low minimum wage, it means it's more likely that both adults in a household need to work, fighting the idea that the man is the moneymaker and the woman is a housewife. In regards to your personal salary, think of what you are actually doing. With the rise of online shopping, do we need retail store workers anymore?

Let’s break this down, because each sentence is its own brand of asinine, and I can’t just tackle it all in one go.

  • “I don’t believe the construction of minimum wage was meant to provide funds for fun stuff.” In 1938, the night before FDR signed the law establishing the federal minimum wage, he said, “Do not let any calamity-howling executive with an income of $1,000 a day…tell you…that a wage of $11 a week is going to have a disastrous effect on all American industry.” The cost of living back then was significantly lower, even when adjusting for inflation. When a movie ticket cost twenty-five cents ($4.20 in today’s dollars), I doubt anyone was making a huge deal out of someone going to catch a movie, unlike today, when a movie costs an average of $8.17 (and here in NYC, is at least $12.50). And if someone did complain, and the person decided to go to Harvard and get a degree in the hopes of making more, they’d just have to raise $420 a year ($7,047 a year in 2015 dollars) to go. Back then, the money just went farther. And there were fewer bills to pay–cell phones and the internet didn’t exist, the only things contributing to light bills were literally lights, and so on. If you could pay for your basic needs on a minimum wage and have an extra twenty-five cents a week to see a movie or grab a beer, I doubt anyone would care. Aside from that, the inherent cruelty in seeing low wage workers as labor drones who don’t deserve happiness is p disgusting honestly.
  • “Also, in a way, a low minimum wage is helping fight male and female stereotypes. With a low minimum wage, it means it’s more likely that both adults in a household need to work, fighting the idea that the man is the moneymaker and the woman is a housewife.” This is peak heteronormative white capitalist feminism. “If it takes two people to make the income of one person, then we can destroy the patriarchy by all being exploited equally!” I’m actually impressed by how goddamn stupid this concept is.
  • “In regards to your personal salary, think of what you are actually doing.” What I was doing (the post made it abundantly clear it was a former job) was spending nine hours a day (we had an hour break which had to interrupt our eight hour shift rather than being factored in) plus three hours daily commute (an hour and a half each way) on a job wherein I was required to run (literally, because if a customer complained about it taking too long for me to get back from the stock room, I could have my hours cut or be suspended or fired) between five stock rooms across three floors making up 36,000 square feet. I had to memorize the locations of items on the floor I worked on and the ones I didn’t, the list of color codes, different folds for many different items, prices for at least the most popular fifty to a hundred items, and so on. I had to keep 15,000 feet of displays and shelves and tables fully stocked and perfectly folded and sized while people were shopping, and if I was standing around while something was unfolded across the store, I could have my hours cut or get suspended or fired. I had to do all of this with a smile on my face, because if a customer complained about my attitude, even if it was just for frowning, I could get my hours cut or get suspended or get fired. If the store did less than $250k a day in business, people’s hours were getting cut. I’ve done much higher-paying jobs since and they’ve been much easier.
  • “With the rise of online shopping, do we need retail store workers anymore?” Yes, obviously. Online shopping is for when you’re casually shopping but don’t feel like going to the store, or if there’s something non-vital you want a better price on. If you need something for an event tomorrow, you’re going to the store for it. If you don’t know your size and want to try it on without waiting a week, sending it back, waiting another week for it to get to them and have them ship it back out, and another week before you get the other size, which may or may not be right, you’re going to the store. If you want to touch the garments and see how they feel, or try them on in front of a mirror to make sure the cut and colors look good on you, or get a second opinion from a (more or less) neutral party. If you want to wander around from shop to shop and see what you can find. If you want to go to a thrift store. Plus, if we branch out of retail, fast food isn’t going away because of the internet, nor are servers or bartenders or housekeepers or custodians or grocery store cashiers or deli workers or anyone else who does a service that people use but are underpaid for their labor.

At the end of the day, there will always be workers in positions that are currently underpaid. If every McDonalds worker decided tomorrow to get a STEM degree and were given the means to do so, there would still be only a certain number of STEM jobs and a need for fry cooks. And those fry cooks deserve to be able to meet their basic needs just as much as anyone else.

I’ve been trying to sort through the competing perspectives on Seattle’s minimum wage hike for the last week. 

Seattle raised their minimum wage is stages, to $11 and then to $13 and coming up soon to $15/hour. They commissioned a study from the University of Washington, which would have access to an extraordinarily rich corpus of data from all across Washington State, to examine the effects of the minimum wage increase. When the minimum wage went up to $11, the effects were nothing to write home about for either side of the debate - the study found that the average low-wage worker brought home about $75/month more but that low-wage employment seems to have been depressed slightly. (So, it was a little harder to find a job, but if you found one you’d bring home some extra money.) Since this wasn’t very exciting it didn’t attract much attention, and to my knowledge no concerns were raised about the study methodology at that time.

The $13/hour minimum wage, according to the researchers, was harmful to low-wage workers. When word got out that that’s the direction their research was pointing, the city stopped funding them, instead commissioned a different study using different methodology from UC Berkeley, pressured UC Berkeley to publish their results a week before the results from the University of Washington study, and then publicized/promoted those results (which found no effect on employment in the restaurant sector). 

Then the University of Washington study came out. It found that the average low-wage worker took home $125 less per paycheck as a result of the minimum wage increase, because for every 1% increase in the minimum wage hours were cut by 3%. So you’d earn slightly more per hour but get your hours cut way back. Like UC Berkeley they found no effect in the restaurant sector, but they found dramatic effects in most other low-wage sectors.

This time, lots of concerns have been raised about the University of Washington study methodology. Obviously, since these were not raised when the first leg of the study came out, they’re partially motivated by the desire to refute the findings. On the other hand, that doesn’t make them wrong. People have expressed concerned that they accounted insufficiently for nationwide trends in the retail industry, which might have resulted in cuts to hours even without the minimum wage hike (they accounted for Seattle in comparison to other Washington cities, but if there’s some reason to expect large cities to move differently from small ones and Seattle to be in a reference class different than the rest of the state, this wouldn’t have been fully accounted for.) They take issue with the framing in comparison to ‘a Seattle that didn’t raise the minimum wage’, which is of course something we can’t really know about. And the methodology does not account for people getting part-time employment in industries that their data does not track, like ridesharing or sex work or informal childcare, or getting jobs outside the city. 

My impression is that the result is pretty robust, and that these factors change the details but not the overall picture, which is that when you raise the minimum wage to $13/hour companies cut positions and cut hours, and low-wage workers bring home less money than before. If this is true, the effects when Seattle hikes to $15 will be even more pronounced and harder to explain away, and we’ll have a more definitive answer.

anonymous asked:

Is Seattle's minimum wage increase working?

This latest study from the UW team looks at the effects of both the first and second jumps. The second jump, in January 2016, raised the minimum wage to $10.50 to $13. (The minimum wage has since gone up again, to the current $11 to $15. It goes up again in January to $11.50 to $15.)

The team concluded that the second jump had a far greater impact, boosting pay in low-wage jobs by about 3 percent since 2014 but also resulting in a 9 percent reduction in hours worked in such jobs. That resulted in a 6 percent drop in what employers collectively pay — and what workers earn — for those low-wage jobs.

For an average low-wage worker in Seattle, that translates into a loss of about $125 per month per job.

“If you’re a low-skilled worker with one of those jobs, $125 a month is a sizable amount of money,” said Mark Long, a UW public-policy professor and one of the authors of the report. “It can be the difference between being able to pay your rent and not being able to pay your rent.”

The report also estimated that there are about 5,000 fewer low-wage jobs in the city than there would have been without the law.

medium.com
By Bernie Sanders | Stand With Nissan Workers
Today, all of us, need to send a very loud and a very clear message to Nissan and other large, profitable corporations.
By Bernie Sanders

At a time when the middle class of this country is shrinking and too many working people are struggling to make ends meet, when they are worried about the cost of health care, education for their kids and a dignified retirement, I am proud to stand with everyone who is fighting for dignity on the job and the right to join a union at Nissan.

What Nissan workers in Mississippi are doing takes real courage. They are standing up to a powerful multi-billion dollar global corporation and they are doing that in a state government hostile to the needs of working people and unions. They are standing up to a state government for their kids and their families. They are standing up for economic and racial justice. They are standing up for exploited workers all across the country, many of who have lost hope, and who will be looking at Canton to see if working people can take on a powerful global corporation and secure justice. If Mississippi Nissan workers succeed, it will send a powerful message in the south and across this country that working people are prepared to fight for justice and for a fair share of the economic pie.


Let us be very clear: Despite all of the lies and misinformation that have been spread, Nissan has union representation in 42 out of 45 of its plants around the world. It has a union in Japan. It has a union in France. It has a union in England, Australia, and Spain. If it can negotiate with unions all around he world, surely it can negotiate with a union in Canton, Mississippi.

But today, Nissan is doing everything that it can to deny workers in the south the right to join a union and bargain collectively for higher wages, safer working conditions, decent health care and a secure retirement.

They are hiring low-wage temp workers who earn as little as $12 bucks an hour. Well, workers in a modern plant owned by a major corporation should not be earning $12 an hour because people can’t make it on $12 an hour.

- They have threatened to fire workers who are pro-union.

- They are forcing workers to watch anti-union videos.

- They have been fined $21,000 for safety violations after a worker at this plant lost three fingers.

- They have even implied that if workers vote to join a union they will shut down this plant.

That is unacceptable, it is against the law and it has got to change!

(Continue Reading)

anonymous asked:

Is communism good or bad?

  • Things that countries have tried to do with communism as a justification: bad,  universally so.

  • (Things that countries have tried to do with anti-communism as a justification: bad, universally so with the exception of the space program.)

  • Using some mechanism other than markets to decide what goods are produced in what quantities and how they are distributed: bad.

  • The Communist critique of the pain and dehumanization associated with low-wage work: basically correct.

  • the workers owning the means of production: neutral? like, this could happen in America right now, many workers in certain industries can afford to buy stock in the company such that they collectively owned a voting majority. They just generally seem to prefer to have their money in other forms which are more risk-averse and/or more liquid. Workers, when given the choice, do not seem to actually prefer to own the means of production.

Just to clarify, this wasn’t the school district closing in support of  A Day Without Women (as it was for A Day Without Immigrants), the entire district was forced to close because the district was unable to provide coverage for all of the teachers who requested the day off.

While this speaks volumes to the strength of movement and the momentum that still remains from The Womens March - there is invisible collateral damage when an entire school district must close when a critical mass of it’s salaried employees request the day off. While they are taking the day off for equal pay and other issues, hourly workers who make less and may not represented by a union are now without an entire days pay. Additionally, Parents might have had to unexpectedly find and pay for child care because school was unexpectedly cancelled. It is very likely that parents needed to call out of work and miss wages as well.

I’m not contending that the teachers did this on purpose, realized that joining the strike would lead to an entire district to close and just didn’t care, or even made the connected that the district closing to the very real consequence of hourly school staff and parents missing a whole days pay. But that is, in essence, how privilege works. When you are able to use your salaried position to take part in a movement that leaves behind low wage workers. It doesn’t have to be intentional to be damaging.

The takeaway? As you March, protest and continue to build this movement for gender equality and anti-sexism - think about what needs to be done to build a more inclusive and self aware movement. This isn’t about one’s individual act of protest, but rather what themes are present as the leadership of the movement designs the acts of protest for others to organize around. Push yourselves to push your movement to be inclusive from the top-down.

The solution to this, of course, is to just give low-wage workers money instead of making laws that try to force their employers to do it. No one should have to live on the money they can bring home from $9/hour? Agreed! Give them money. 

But the chasm between the haves and the have-nots is creating tension within the feminist movement. A half-century ago, women were uniformly shut out of many careers. The decades since have seen widening inequality between educated women who have benefited from new career opportunities and a growing class of low-wage workers who have not.

Among the goals of the new wave of feminist activism is the expansion of worker protections that many professional women already have, including a living wage, paid family leave and fair schedules.

On Twitter, some said they plan to strike for those who can’t.

“#IStrikeFor my grandmother who can’t be there . . . she was a maid for many years who didn’t get the benefit of promotions and raises” one person tweeted.

Read more here: Is the ‘Day Without a Woman’ protest elitist? 

4

Labor Day 2017 in Buffalo, N.Y., September 4, 2017.

On Labor Day in Buffalo, N.Y., Buffalo Roja y Negra, Black Lives Matter, Workers World Party-Buffalo and Buffalo DSA joined with UFCW/Change Walmart on a picket at McDonalds in solidarity with low-wage workers fighting for what’s theirs—the right to $15/hour and a union. 

Together they marched to take their history-changing place as one of the leading contingents in the Labor Day Parade held by the Buffalo Central Labor Council, with the WWP banner at the head of the contingent. 

Photos and report by Ellie Dorritie

“if you don’t like your pay, just quit your job and find a better one!”

this comes with a few assumptions:

  1. there are better jobs in the area, that pay better
  2. that these jobs are hiring
  3. that the person in question is capable of getting the job (for example, a lot of jobs require multiple years of experience, or a degree, which not everyone has.)

when someone is talking about their low wages, or bad conditions at their job, they often are doing so because they have no other recourse. they can’t demand better pay; they simply don’t possess that kind of power. if they could get a better job, they would.

low wages are an artificial condition created by business owners; they pay their workers low wages to increase their profits, and not for any other reason. they dehumanize the human beings that they employ so that they can make more money.