low light plants

kujyou12  asked:

Hey Kokoro. I kinda want a tiny plant in my room just to take care of for fun since my parents don't allow me to have pets. Do you have any recommendations? Sunlight won't reach my room at all, and I obviously cannot get my table wet from watering it either. Not sure if there are any plant that would fulfill those exception. I feel like this is a stupid question...

It does pose a challenge! But never stupid ;) I spent all morning thinking about this and maaaybe you could try air plants (tillandsia)?

You can find em for sale in pretty much any ‘garden center’ of a supermarket. Most often, they’re in little clear terrarium globes meant for hanging.

Looket, that one has a bloom! I didn’t know they bloomed!! Ahem - I’ve been SUPER tempted to try one, but I’ve similar conditions to yours in the room I want it in, but I’ve been pondering it.

They need light, but they get their water from the air and don’t need soil (just something to anchor to with their roots). Read here and here for more info about air plants. Note the possible ‘submerge it in a dish of water for 12 hours’ watering method every ‘10 to 14 days‘ in the first link since an indoor room doesn’t have the same humidity as the plant’s natural outdoor environment. Perhaps you could do that on a different table when it’s needed.

As for light - every plant needs some amount of light, and if sunlight isn’t available you can try artificial light - dunno how good a single bulb from a general desk lamp would be, but if you can fit a grow light like this one (’Philips 60-Watt Incandescent A19 Agro Plant Light Bulb’ in case the link doesn’t work) into a desk/table lamp and dedicate it to the plant for all the daylight hours (and turn it off for, in my opinion - about 8, or whatever you sleep - hours of darkness as all plants need some dark), that may be enough - but again - that’s only my opinion.

Friends have also asked me about succulent options for low-no light rooms, and I answered one here where I had some suggestions. I dunno about other types of plants for low light rooms, tho. :) On the upside, too - small succulents and air plants are at most like $5. So, that and possibly a bulb - you’ve only spent about $10 if it doesn’t work out. Lemme know how it works out if you try one!

neanealuv  asked:

Faye! My girlfriend bought me my first succulent to take care if and now I am hooked on plants lol. Can you tell me what plants would be best for improving air quality? And if there were any that would help with anxiety or depression or things of that nature? Thank You!

CONGGRRAAATTSSS ~ 🎉 I literally could not be more excited for you, plants are fantastic and I’m so glad you’re diggin’ them! (Pun intended if you can call it that). Below I’ll have indoor plants listed in the categories you asked for and their proper care as well! As for plants that help with depression and anxiety I don’t know if you mean magically or medicinal/aromatherapy so all plants listed in that area do both. Just to be safe, all of these plants are okay to be around dogs and cats.

Plants for purifying air

  • Spider Plants. They help absorb formaldehyde and xylene. These require watering once every week(more or less depending on temperature), they like bright to moderate lights, water with distilled or filtered water. Water with a good amount of fluoride can make them sick.
  • Bamboo Palm. Helps to remove formaldehyde and is suitable for acting as a natural humidifier for most indoor areas. It can also help to remove xylene and toluene. These like to remain moist but not overwatered, each time after watering remove the drainage plate, cut off all dead leaves as they come, indirect and low light is fine.
  • Wax Plants. Whichever breed you please. Helps to improve overall air quality by removing benzene and formaldehyde from the air. This plant can also increase overall air purification - good for people with asthma! Water it each time it’s dry in the summer but in the winter it needs far less frequent water, just give it a bit more than you would a succulent. Moderate to low sunlight is good, they do like having their leaves misted but do not mist them when they’re budding or have flowers.
  • Lilyturf! This is great because it also helps with insomnia and sleep troubles, and it’s magical properties also offer aid in depression. Helps to remove ammonia, toluene, xylene, and formaldehyde from the air. This plant is capable of increasing oxygen levels and can help to improve air quality. If you decide to grow this from seed, you need to soak the seed in warm water for 24 hours NO LESS before sowing. Sow in fall and winter. They do well in all forms of sunlight but like slightly acidic soil with decent drainage, water moderately. 
  • Boston Fern. Helps to remove formaldehyde from the air and is said to act as a natural type of air humidifier. This plant can also remove xylene and toluene. It is said to be one of the best houseplants for air purification. They’re a bit high maintenance, they like cool areas, indirect sunlight, and high humidity especially in the winter. Water moderately.

Plants for depression and anxiety

  • Lavender. Medicinally and magically lavender is fantastic for depression and anxiety, although it can be moderately difficult to grow for beginners. They need full sun at least 6-8 hours a day, let the soil dry out before watering, lavender loves heat. Make sure if you keep it on a windowsill to rotate it every other day so the whole plant gets equal sunlight.
  • Jasmine. Again medicinally and magically good for both depression and anxiety. It needs full light in the spring and summer and indirect in the rest of the seasons, soil should be moist and well drained, be careful about using well/unfiltered water. This is one of my favorites!
  • Rosemary.  A member of the mint family; improves air quality, increases memory function, banishes anxiety. Must become acclimated to less sunlight, never let soil dry out completely, susceptible to powdery mildew so do not mist it and make sure you prune it accordingly.
  • Moth Orchid. These beautiful babies are good magically for anxiety, insecurities, and self love. You can never have too many if you ask me! Make sure you keep them warm but out of sunlight, once a week watering is typically the best you want to keep the soil slightly moist below the surface.
  • Lemon Balm. Another plant that is both medicinal and magical in it’s properties for anxiety and depression. This another favorite of mine, has a similar property to cat nip, and a good beginner plant. Try to give it up to five hours a day of direct sunlight, a steady supply of water, but good drainage is a must - they recover quickly from wilt so it’s better to water too less vs too much.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac is a great website to reference for growing plants, it’s low key my bible. I hope this helped you out some sweet pea!

Betta Care Guide: All About Bettas!

The “Betta Basics”
-2.5+ gallon tank
-heater (76-82F)
-thermometer
-low-flow filter
-1+ hide
-decor
-silk/live plants
-quality food

A More Comprehensive Guide

***Tank Size***

2.5 gallons:
The absolute minimum, I do not recommend keeping a betta in anything less than this because even in a cycled 2.5, keeping a *stable* cycle is very difficult, and requires more frequent water changes. In a tank this small, you’ll most likely need to buy an adjustable heater as well, since the smallest (trustworthy) heaters on the market are 7-7.5 watts, and depending on where you live or how hot/cold you keep your house/room, the heat will fluctuate too often, or be too hot or too cold since the volume of water is quite small. A 2.5 gallon betta tank is doable.

5 gallons:
A great median for those who want to give their bettas a wonderful environment, but may be cramped on space, move around often, or whose living arrangements have aquarium-related restrictions. A cycled 5 gallon tank with a betta generally requires a water change 1x a week. A 5 gallon is also easier to heat and keep a stable cycle with a 5 gallon than a 2.5 gallon. I still recommend an adjustable heater (I’ll always recommend an adjustable heater), though, as I’ve found that even with an appropriately-sized preset heater/non-adjustable heater, the temperature fluctuates too often and by too much. A 5 gallon is a perfectly good choice!

10 gallons:
A palace! Your new betta would love to have a 10+ gallon tank! They’ll swim over every inch of it, I promise its not too big. A fantastic choice for those that have the space and can afford to set up a 10 gallon or larger with all the bells and whistles (décor, filter, heater, etc.).

note: If you feel you can’t give your betta a 10+ gallon tank, and you can only afford a 2.5 or 5 gallon setup (or something in between), that DOES NOT mean I (or anyone else) think you’re a bad fish parent ❤ as long as you can provide the basic necessities your fish requires and keep on top of water quality, then do what you can when you can! Maybe it’ll be a few months before you can buy your fish that new hide or a few extra plants, or maybe you’ll have to wait ‘til xmas or your bday to be able to afford a larger tank if that’s what you want, and that’s okay. As long as you do the best within your means (provided your animal’s basic needs are met), that’s all your fish would ask of you ❤

***Temperature***
Bettas are tropical fish! That means they require temperatures of 76-82F.

Why do they need this temperature range, though? Well, fish are ectothermic (“cold-blooded”) meaning that they depend on their surrounding environment (the water) to regulate their body temperatures! Your human body also requires a certain body temperature to optimize all those bodily functions it performs. Think about frostbite (affects circulation) or hypothermia (affects body temperature and bodily function). Your fish can suffer similar effects when its water is kept too cold. A cold betta will be more prone to fin rot/melt (the tips of the fins become necrotic) because their circulation is affected. A colder fish will also have a slower digestive process and slower metabolism, meaning that it will become lethargic because it’s organs can’t work fast enough to produce energy it needs to be healthy and active. You wanna see a bright colorful active betta? Give them a heated tank! 😃

***Thermometer***
Even if you have an adjustable heater, you should invest in a thermometer (1.50$, glass, Walmart)! I personally use an adjustable thermometer, which has an internal thermostat which tells it when to shut off/on, but when I set the heater to 79, my tanks stay around 82F, but I wouldn’t know that unless I had a thermometer to let me know what the actual tank temperature is! I definitely recommend spending the extra buck for one :)

Also, those sticker ones that go on the outside of the tank are not reliable, seeing as they go on the outside of the tank, and show a range of temperatures more or less. They cost about the same as a glass one (which is much more accurate), so I recommend either glass or digital, but not the stickers.

Filtration:
Bettas aren’t fond of tons of flow, which can present some challenges to your friendly neighborhood aquarist. Luckily, there are plenty of options when it comes to betta-safe filtration.

HOBs:
Hang-On-Back style filters. Some have an intake pipe, which should be covered with a sponge to keep your bettas fins (or the betta itself) from being sucked up and shredded/injured. You can search for “pre-filter sponge” or “intake filter sponge” on amazon, google, or find a fluval prefilter sponge at your local petsmart/Petco. You can also DIY one out of cut-to-size filter foam/sponge. HOB filters can also have a strong out-flow. Some have spray bars, some have spickets, and some just have a wide-mouth waterfall-style opening. If you find that the flow is pushing your betta around, or your betta is struggling to swim against the current, you can baffle it! Some common techniques for baffling filters are the “water-bottle baffle”, using a shower loofa/pouf, covering the out-flow opening with filter sponge/floss, or an intake sponge. I have the fluval spec v and I use an intake sponge on the out-spout since it’s a short spigot.

Sponge Filters:
These are block sponges which usually sit on the bottom of the aquarium and are hooked up to an airline tube and air pump. They push air through the sponge, creating a vacuum and pulling water through. The air bubbles that come out of the top of the sponge don’t create much horizontal flow that pushes bettas around, but instead the water flow is directed upwards. The bubbles provide oxygenation and surface agitation as well.

***Décor***

Hides:
Bettas like to feel safe (as do all fish and other pets) and giving them at least one cave to retreat to will give your fish that sense of security. You can buy something from the fish store, a local pet store, or a pet chain store. Besides the pre-made ones (logs, rock caves, skulls, etc.), you can buy terra cotta pots for around a 1$ or so. Just make sure that the pots aren’t just painted brown, but that they’re a terra cotta material all the way through. Fish have also gotten stuck in the small drainage holes at the bottom of these pots, so be sure to plug it up with some aquarium-safe silicone or something. Also, be sure to make sure that your hides don’t have sharp edges your betta could tear his/her fins on, and that the hide doesn’t have holes that your betta may get stuck in. Usually you can sand down rough edges though :)

Plants:
Plastic plants are generally a no-no, as they can tear your bettas fins. Usually, if they pass the “panty-hose” test they are deemed “betta-safe” but it’s still better not to chance it when there are plenty of gorgeous silk plants out there! “silk” plants are made from material (not necessarily silk) instead of plastic. Silk plants may have plastic stems, but that’s ok so long as there aren’t any sharp seams; the silk leaves are what’s important here!

Live plants are also an option. Anubias, anacharis, java fern, moss, and banana plants are all low-light plants which require no CO2 and no special substrate. However, this is not a plant guide so you’ll have to research how you can plant them or add them to your tank on your own.

***Food***
There are lots of food which is marked specially for bettas, but don’t fall for marketing gimmicks! Know what’s in your pet’s food before you buy. If the first few ingredients are “meal”s (fish meal, wheat meal, etc.) or the first few ingredients are plant-based, then this is not the food for your betta.
What you want to look for is whole ingredients, or specifically-named ingredients (whole fish, halibut, salmon, krill, etc.). New Life Spectrum and Omega One are good brands to check out. Hikari is ok, but their ingredients are not as quality as they used to be, and if you read the ingredients on their current “Betta Bio-Gold” you’ll see what I mean. Foods with fillers/freeze-dried foods don’t have a lot of nutritional value, and while a freeze-dried food may make a tasty treat, it shouldn’t be your fish’s staple diet. You can also feed frozen/live blood worms, mysis shrimp, etc. Bettas are insectivores, and cannot digest plant matter, so they should not be given any type of algae wafer or vegetables (this includes peas; an alternative to feeding peas for bloat is to feed daphnia!!).

***Tankmates***
I’ll preface this section by stating that bettas don’t need tankmates! :) Tankmates are more for you than for your fish, and should be chosen carefully.

Tankmates in General:
-please remember to make sure that your tank is suitable for the tank mates you wish to house; you wouldn’t keep your betta in a 1 gallon unfiltered/unheated tank, so don’t do the equivalent to your betta’s tankmates  your fish are all equal, so please, please, please make sure that you put in the same amount of research and care for the tankmates that you do for your betta! make sure your tank mates have the same requirements are your betta, and their temperament won’t put your betta at risk.
-ALWAYS DO RESEARCH ON THE SPECIES YOURE CONSIDERING BEFORE PURCHASING!! :)
-always have a backup plan in case your tankmates don’t get along with your betta, or your betta doesn’t get along with his tankmates 
-a 20 gallon is the best minimum choice for a community-style betta tank, as it opens up more options and gives your betta and his/her tankmates plenty of space!
-be prepared to separate/rehome/etc. “problem fish” or a “problem betta”. if your betta isn’t really the community type, don’t try to force him/her to be; it won’t work out well for anyone. Get that betta an individual setup as soon as possible, or if your tank is large enough, divide it so that your betta has his/her own space. 

Good Tank Mates:

 Corydoras:
shoaling, 6+ to a group - keeping them in groups smaller than this will stress them to death…literally sometimes
10+ gallons (dwarf/pygmy), 20+ gallons (regular)
tropical, lots of species to choose from
sand/barebottom is a MUST - p they have soft bellies and sensitive barbels, and gravel can scratch up their bellies (which leads to stress or infection) or damage their barbels o.o also, they sift through sand to find little bits of food naturally, so sand lets them display this natural behavior and you get to see it too!

Rasboras:
schooling, 6+ to a school – keeping them in schools smaller than this will stress out the fish
10-15+ gallons – depending on the species
tropical, lots of species to choose from
note: “galaxy rasboras” are NOT rasboras (rasboras belong to the boraras genus). Galaxy rasboras are actually a species of danio (other common name: celestial pearl danio) and are not tropical.

Snails:
under 10 gallons: nerites, ramshorns, horned nerites, and other small snails
10+ gallons: mystery snails & other snails listed above – mystery snails get quite large and have a bioload as large, if not larger, than your betta’s, so a mystery snail is more suited to living in a 10 gallon tank than in something smaller

shrimp:
not all bettas are “shrimp-safe”, meaning that if you want to try shrimp, you should be prepared for the worst case scenario: your betta eats them! if youre okay with the possibility that you may lose some shrimp, then i suggest starting out with a few shrimp.
Amano shrimp are larger, great for algae, should be kept in groups of at least 3-5
cherry shrimp (and other neocardinia sp.) are hardy, but small (most likely to be a tasty snack), colorful/many variations to choose from!
ghost shrimp can actually be nippy, so I’d recommend against them, even though they’re pretty cheap~
putting shrimp in a 2.5 gallon tank is doable, but a 5 gallon tank would be much better

otocinclus:
do best in groups, 3+ - they’re not traditional shoaling or schooling fish, but are still social
20+ gallons - otos are sensitive to water quality
if your tank doesn’t have a ton of algae for them to eat, then I suggest supplementing their diet with cucumbers/zucchini/algae wafers/etc.  

plecos:
tank size depends completely on the species your considering, there are a ton!!
I suggest supplementing their diet with cucumbers/zucchini/algae wafers/etc. 

ember tetras:
schooling, 6+ to a school – keeping the in schools smaller than this will stress out the fish
10+ gallons – they do ok in a 10, but would prefer a 15 (long) or a 20 gallon! 😊

Bad Tank Mates:
danios:
NOT tropical (max temp is like 74F), they’re schooling (6+ fish in a group), and are insanely active! this means they need at least a 20 gallon, and need to be with other cooler/temperate water fish like other danios and minnows :) Also, even if they could do ok in a heated 10 gallon, their active nature tends to stress bettas out :/

White Cloud Mountain Minnows (or any other minnows):
NOT tropical (max temp is around 74F), they’re schooling (6+ fish in a group), and are insanely active! They’re smaller, around 1”, but they need at least a 10 gallon, and should only be housed with other cooler/temperate water fish such as other danios and minnows :) Also, even if they could do ok in a heated 10 gallon, their active nature tends to stress bettas out :/

Neon Tetras:
they’re tropical, could do ok in a 10 (but would do better in a 20). Enough people have had fin-nipping/aggression issues that they’ve made this list. Not everyone who houses bettas with neon tetras will have these issues, but if there’s a possibility of putting your fish’s health and wellbeing at risk, why take the risk? There are plenty of other safer, more suitable tank mates out there 😊

all other tetras not mentioned:
tetras tend to be nippy in general (black skirt tetras, for example) and there are safer options out there; dont risk it! <3

mollies:
get too large to be housed safely with bettas
can be aggressive/attack/bully your betta

platies:
some peoples bettas seem to do ok, some do not, as they can be nippy or aggressive towards your betta

Guppies/endlers:
their flowing tails and bright colors also tend to bring out aggression, and since they have such pretty tails, they may be nipped at by your betta, or vice versa

/*Thanks for giving that book a read! If you feel as though I’ve provided inaccurate information, could make an improement, or have an addition to suggest, feel free to let me know! :3*/

HAPPY FISHKEEPING

anonymous asked:

heyyy! okay so i am just completely new to this and i really dont even know where to start. is there anyway you could help me out by telling me what i should research or literally anything you can tell me would be helpful too.

I’m going to assume you are talking about the green path specifically, and not witchcraft in general. There’s a lot of generic how-to guides on tumblr on witchcraft, so I’m going to give you something a bit more specific. Sooo here it goes! :)

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~Naomi’s Guide to Beginner Green Witchcraft~


1)Start a journal. Write it in everytime you study. I call mine a Book of Mirrors, because I’m reflecting on what I have learned/read. Anytime you have new ideas or thoughts about a concept, write them down. This helps you process and remember the information, and sometimes you’ll find that while writing you’ll make connections to previous things you’ve written about. It’s not your grimoire, it’s your workbook, where you place your field notes to sift through later to put into your grimoire.  I like using an a5 sized notebook that has about 200 pages or so in it.

2) Read as much as you can. Ask questions to as many people as you can, even if it’s just online. As much knowledge is available to you, look for it, and read it with a level of skepticism. Reflect on it in your journal. There’s a lot of rules and explanations on how things work in different practices, and many contradict each other. Don’t read something and take it at face value, make sure you find out why and understand the reasoning.

Don’t know what to read? Look online for reviews and then just pick something. Go to goodreads or amazon. See what stands out and read up on it. You’ll get a better idea of your interests that way. The first book I read (on green witchery) was Green Witchcraft by Ann Moura, which is a bit (a lot) disorganized, and has some historical innaccuracies due to her accounts being from word of mouth passed down in her family. But it sparked my interest and gave me a starting point, and that’s really all you need. Don’t focus so much on “What is the best way” because there’s no answer for that. You have to figure it out yourself.

3) Practice shielding, daily if you can. This is the best best best way to start trying to practice with energy work, because it can’t really backfire on you, and you need to know how to do it anyways. At worst your protection is just going to be a bit weak. Now there are hundreds of methods to this, so I suggest researching that to find a method that works great for you.

4) Research local plant life. See what’s invasive, what needs to be cared for or is in short supply. Find out what is harming the environment in your area, and if there is a way you can make your life more ethical. I say ethical instead of environmentally friendly, because people are living creatures too, and they should concern you just as much. You don’t have to be a martyr or put yourself through undue hardship, just see if there’s anywhere you can improve. Look up magickal properties and safety precautions. DO NOT CONSUME ANYTHING WITHOUT FIRST KNOWING EXACTLY WHAT IT IS. If a plant is totally foreign it’s actually best to not even touch it, ask anyone who didn’t know what poison ivy looks like. Plants are medicines. They have contraindications and dosages. Some are extremely poisonous.

5) If you don’t have any, some basic garden knowledge is something you’re going to want. The plants physical needs are very very very important.

6) Speaking of plant research, double and triple check all of your sources. There’s plenty of “good” herbal books out there that fail to mention certain things, or flat out mix up information and plant names. Given that a lot of beneficial plants have poisonous counterparts that look similiar, this is really, really, important.

7) Go into your yard and talk to the plants out there - they live right by you, it’s okay to go say hi! Don’t have a yard? Go pick yourself up a potted plant. If you are particularly sunlight access starved, there are a lot of indoor low light plants, you can find something. Introduce yourself, ask if you can talk. See if you can sense a response! It’s okay if you don’t. Some plants are just quiet and won’t “talk” until they know you, and sometimes you just can’t “hear” them yet. It takes practice! I put those words in quotes because it’s not like you’re going to hear sentences outloud. It’s like suddenly feeling an emotion, or a texture, like soft and warm, or prickly and sharp (which means they want to be left alone, by the way). Keep this relationship up. Tend to them, leave offerings if you find yourself developing a working relationship, or if you harvest some of the plant for use. A good rule is to not take more than 30% of the mass, unless you’re growing the crop specifically for consumption, like vegetables and the like.

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Starting these steps should really get your foot in the door on how green witchcraft works and how it will work for you. My practice is really personal, I do things a specific way that I developed myself when it comes to casting spells. The best I can do is send you on a path to figure it out for yourself. Take this as a gentle guide, not a hard rule book, and good luck on your journey! <3 

lost-astro-naut  asked:

Hello, I would like to try a planted tank, but i have no clue how to start. I've been doing some research but i keep coming across terms like root tabs, water collum and substrate that I dont know. I have a 10 gallon tank that will have a betta after everything is planted and good. Any tips or help you can offer?

Hey @justanothersortasmartfangirl​! :p Hopefully these explanations of the terms ‘root tabs’, ‘water column’, and ‘substrate’ help you out! :) If you need/want further explanation or need/want me to explain them to you in a different way, please let me know! :)


Root Tabs: small tablets or capsules of plant fertililzer that can be put into the substrate, under plants, that slowly release nutrients. Usually they’re used in tanks with sand substrate, but you can add them to any substrate! You can buy them commercially, from hobbyists, or diy them yourself!

Water column: the water in your tank, basically….usually we refer to the tank’s water as the ‘water column’ because there are different levels of the ‘water column’: top, mid, and bottom. Some fish occupy the top level of the water column (like hatchets), some occupy the mid level of the water column (most school fish, like neon tetras), and others occupy the bottom of the water column (like corydoras). fun fact: you can usually tell what part of the water column a fish generally inhabits by looking at their mouth! Usually a fish’s mouth position determines where their food source is, and therefore where they spend a good amount of their time :) superior = top, terminal = middle, inferior = bottom. Another place that you might hear the term ‘water column’ is when people talk about cycling. A common myth is that beneficial (nitrifying) bacteria live in the ‘water column’ (aka the water in your tank), when they actually live on the surfaces in your tank!

Substrate: the ground cover at the bottom of your tank. Sand and gravel are ‘substrates’! There are also plant-specific ‘substrates’ like Fluorite or Eco-Complete or ADA Amazonia. If a tank has no ‘substrate’ then it is called a ‘bare-bottom’ tank :)


Planted tanks are awesome! I keep at least a few live plants in all my tanks! They help to take excess nutrients out of the water and look fantastic imo :)

Tidbits for Planted Tanks:

  • If there’s a specific substrate that you want / prefer / need: pick plants that work with that substrate! (ex: don’t get dwarf hair grass if you want gravel)
  • If there are specific plants you want: pick a substrate that will work with them. (ex: if you want amazon swords, pick a nutrient-rich plant substrate)
  • Some plant substrates leach ammonia for a few weeks. I believe that this is supposed to help your tank cycle and to give your plants some extra nutrients. If you use a substrate that leaches, a fishless cycle is recommended.
  • If you’re on a budget: sand is going to be your cheapest option, root tabs optional (depending on the plants you want to put in your tank).
  • Not all plants need to be planted: Marimos and banana plants don’t need to be planted, and sit on top of the substrate. Mosses can be left floating or tied/glued to things. Frogbit and duckweed float on the surface of the water. These kinds of plants do well in any tank, whether the substrate is gravel, sand, plant substrate, glass stones, barebottom, etc.
  • Some plants are ‘ root feeders’, meaning that they take most of their nutrients from the substrate. You can grow root feeders (like amazon swords) in sand (though they seem to prefer / grow larger leaves in plant substrate) they’ll just grow…really long roots lol when i put swords in my sand-only tank, they used more energy to grow roots than leaves! i had 12″ roots on a 3″ sword after a month or so! Adding root tabs to sand is a good idea if you want plants that are heavy ‘root feeders’.
  • Some plants are ‘water column’ feeders, meaning that they take most of their nutrients from the water in your tank. These plants can grow floating (like duckweed and frogbit) or be left floating or planted (like anacharis: you can stick it in the substrate or you can let it float).
  • Most root-feeders do best with a plant substrate, such as Fluorite
  • Most water-column-feeders aren’t picky and will do well with any substrate
  • Some plants have ‘rhizomes’, which is like a big fat horizontal ‘root’ that the smaller roots grow down from and the stems/leaves grow up from. Anubias and java ferns are popular rhizome plants! These plants can be superglued to stuff, tied to stuff, or planted. If you choose to plant your rhizome-plants be sure to bury only bury the roots, burying the rhizome may kill the plant.
  • Mosses can be left floating, superglued to stuff, or tied around stuff. Moss-covered driftwood is pretty popular!
  • Not all plants require fertilizer, but it usually doesn’t hurt to have some! Seachem Flourish is what I use, but there are probably quite a few more liquid fertilizers that are popular in the hobby. If you add inverts like shrimp to a tank, make sure that your fertilizer is safe for them!
  • Not all plants require CO2 (a tank that has CO2 (and usually high-lighting and lots of fertilizers) is referred to as a ‘high-tech planted tank’, a tank that has no CO2 (usually low to medium lighting, ferts optional) is referred to as a ‘low-tech planted tank’), but some plants (like dwarf baby tears) require CO2. Plants that require high light and CO2 aren’t usually recommended for beginners, but if you find that you really really really want a tank with a nice ‘carpet’ (some plants stay small and spread until they cover the whole layer of substrate; these plants are referred to as ‘carpeting plants’. popular carpeting plants include s. repens, dwarf baby tears, and dwarf hair grass.) and some other high-needs plants then do a ton of research and go for it! :)
  • Some plants require lots of one specific nutrient, like iron! Red plants and swords usually need more iron :) You can buy nutrient-specific supplemental fertilizers like Seachem Flourish Iron or Flourish Potassium.
  • Plants are usually labelled as ‘high-light’, ‘medium-light’, or ‘low-light’. Plants that grow under nearly any standard bulb or low-output LED light are usually ‘low-light’ plants (anubias, marimos, most mosses, anacharis). Some plants prefer a brighter light (like amazon swords), like a plant-specific light (like a finnex stingray or something like that). Others require very high light to survive and thrive. 
  • The rating of a light (low, medium, or high) is usually measured in PAR (photosynthetically active radiation). 
  • You may also hear about a certain light fixture’s “temperature”, which refers to the color spectrum of a light (some lights put off more blue or red light), which is measured in ‘Kelvin’. 
  • You may sometimes hear lighting in terms of “watts per gallon”, which was a popular standard of measuring lighting output when most people used T5/T8 lighting (those long tube bulbs). As we’ve moved more and more into LED lighting, PAR has become a much more accurate way to measure light rating! 

Handy Dandy Linkeroos:

Aquarium LED Lights (priced low to high):

Liquid Fertilizers:

  • Seachem Flourish Line (Flourish, Flourish Excel, Flourish Iron, Flourish Potassium, etc.)
  • Aquarium Co-op’s Easy Green (i’ve been wanting to try this out for a while…it’s on my aquarium wishlist! i’ve heard great things and another youtuber who grows and sells plants and was developing his own fertilizer formula said that the Easy Green Formula was quite close to his. If anyone has tried it, please leave a mini review!)
  • API Leafzone (I’ve seen some people on here who use it, but I haven’t personally used it. If you use this, please leave a mini review!)
  • Brighwell Aquatics’s FlorinMulti (I have some, but I haven’t used it yet. If you’ve used this product, please leave a mini review!)

Hopefully this info helps you out! :D Let me know if there’s anything you’d like me to clarify further! :) Feel free to share how your planted tank turns out!! :D

If anyone else has anything to add (posts, corrections, helpful tidbits), please do!

9

@ranaspkillnarieth asked to see photos of my tanks!
The top 4 are all the same tank over the years. I’ve had this tank since 2001 and it’s constantly evolving. It’s a 54 gallon corner tank with curved glass and has been a nightmare to light properly due to its shape (like a wedge of pie). It’s currently high-tech; custom CO2 rig with in-line diffusion, custom lighting rig (LED and T5), canister filter. Right now it’s plants only.
The next three are of my 12 gallon tank. I’ve had this tank since 2003 I believe. It’s been my shrimp-only tank for most of its life (well, okay, some snails too). Medium tech, with built in filter/sump, medium grade LED lighting with a heater. It too evolves over time, visually!
The last two photos are of my 8 gallon tank, I’ve had for a few years now. This is my betta tank! Built in sump filter, low grade LED lighting, heater.

7 Tips for Building a Simple Betta Tank

Making your tank beautiful (and keeping the fish healthy and thriving) does not have to be hard!

I absolutely love bettas, and chances are that if you’re reading this, you love bettas, too.

Bettas are known for their vibrant colours and feisty personalities. Because they are so hardy, many people get them as first-time pets. However, to keep things simple while also ensuring that your betta is healthy and thriving, it is important to do your research beforehand. With my experience and research, I’d like to pass along 7 tips for building a simple betta tank:

Keep reading

5

Grabbed some gorgeous stems from BDS Aquatics today and helped Adam practice planting them. The tank looks much more filled out now!

Also trying a new approach with the cycle, seeding the tank with filter media from my cycled tank and going ahead with fish-in this time. Piggy the Platy was being picked on by Poutabout, so it seems it is safer for her to be here eating and pooping by herself anyhow - she is in heaven.

Man I am so tempted to run back to that fish store and scoop up a bunch of new plants. And I really want a tank with Blue Rams, they are so lovely and the store has such beautiful, tiny juveniles. The store’s focus is cichlids, but also has an amazing little saltwater room. Everything is so healthy. Hmm payday tomorrow…

merelivia  asked:

Hi I’m in college and thinking about getting a betta. I was wondering what youd recommend me getting or give me like a list of what all I need. I plan on using tank about 2.5 gallons.

hey there @merelivia​ :D sorry it took me so long to reply <3 hopefully i’ve covered all the bases tho!

this post is a great starting point! :) there are probably a few things missing from the supplies list i included in that post (i really gotta update that post), so here’s a more accurate one!

- 2.5+ gallon tank (the bigger the better tho! a 5.5 gallon is a good minimum to start with imo…and it’s easier to keep a stable cycle with!)  you can buy an all-in-one tank like the fluval spec or the top fin glass tank, a starter kit (usually 5 gallon kits don’t come with heaters, but some 10 gallon kits do), or buy all of the items separately.
- filter (after having HOBs, built-in filters, and sponge filters…sponge filters are my fave .-. but built-in filters like the fluval spec’s and top fin glass tank’s are 2nd fave). if you get a hob, you may need a baffle! if you get a tank with a built-in filter, you may need to buy a sponge to slip over the out-spout.
– How sponge filters work + how to set them up
– Pros + cons of sponge filters

-heater (76-82F) i have three of these heaters and they’re great! the cords are really short tho, thats the big downside :T this post has a ton of other heater suggestions!
-thermometer glass ones are my personal fave, and way more accurate than the sticker kind. i think theyre 1-2$ at walmart!
- 1+ hide (caves, terra cotta pots, an ornament, just a place where they can hide out or chill in)
- decor (lots of decor ideas listed below!)
- silk/live plants (plastic isn’t the best idea since plastic plants can tear a betta’s delicate fins)
– craft mesh “betta beds”
– dollar store flowers (remove wire, soak to make sure they don’t bleed)
- pvc, terra cotta pot, mug, glass, jar hides (your cabinet, goodwill, dollar store)
– dollar store betta tanks
– diy decor
– craiglist, facebook marketplace, offerup, letgo, etc. BE HUNTIN!
– petco’s plants are bogo rn (i thought they were buy one get one free, but my receipt tells me they’re buy one get one 50% off…either way its a win~)
– petco and petsmart usually have plants and supplies for sale on their website but not in the store. if you show the cashier the online price, they’ll match it at the checkout so make sure to do some online window shopping before you go!
– hobby lobby and micahaels have a ton of their floral stuffs on sale right now as well!
- quality food i like new life spectrum thera +a pellets (long name, i know, but i know u can buy them at petco!) or omega one pellets or the betta buffet flakes. frozen foods like blood worms and shrimp are also good additions to a betta’s diet :)
- test kit this kit is my favorite! the value is faaaantastic and the tests give more specific readings than the strips :p
-
lid bettas can be jumpers so lids are recommended. if your tank doesn’t come with a lid or is an odd shape and you can’t buy one, then craft mesh may be good option! it’s really cheap at walmart or craft stores and you can cut it with regular scissors. it’s basically plastic mesh…you can weigh it down or create a frame for it since it’s pretty light ^-^
- light if you don’t buy a kit that comes with a hood+light combo, or any light at all…you’ll probably need one! leds are a good choice :) i just bought 2 of these nicrew lights and they work amazingly! definitely bright enough for at least medium light plants and super white~ you can also buy clip-on LED with a gooseneck like this one (tho i’d be sure to check the measurements on lights as cheap as these!) or even a light from home depot~ for a tank that small, you could also use a desk lamp. with a desk lamp you could probably grow low-light plants like anacharis and anubias. when i had a little planted vase on my desk, i just went to goodwill and got one for $3 ^-^”
- water change bucket it’ll make water changes so much easier. one of the best $3 investments i’ve ever made. you can get 5.5 gallon buckets at walmart and home depot :p
- aquarium siphon (also called a gravel vac) helps remove water during a water change and can suck up gunk from the substrate
- water conditioner i love seachem prime!

If you’ve never had fish before, these posts might also be helpful!

General Fishkeeping + Equipment:
Fishkeeping 101
“Seeding” a tank
Why do we do water changes? How much water do I change?
Invest in a waterchange bucket
Aquarium siphoning + vaccuuming
Baffling a filter 
Everything I’ve learned about filters and filter media

Decor + DIY:
DIY Aquarium Decor
An ask that lists some easy aquarium plants
How to superglue plants to stuff
Tidbits for Planted Tanks

Care Guides:
A betta care guide: All about bettas!
I bought a betta, now what do i do!? (fish-in cycling included!)


Other handy dandy posts (written by other awesome tumblrs):
Fishless Cycling Masterpost
There are a few different ways to cycle a tank and this post is insanely informative!
How to do the thing (cycling)
Cycle your tank!
Handy Articles Master Post
Getting the most out of aquarium plants
Plants melt and that’s okay
Big list of aquarium plants
List of low-light aquarium plants
Planted Tanks for Beginners and So Can You
Comprehensive Planted Tank Guide
Dollar Store Fish Tank
“Cleaner Fish” Why They Don’t Exist & Your Aquarium Doesn’t Need One By Ren Brooks

//if anyone has any info to add, please do!

DWARF WATER LETTUCE FOR SALE!

DWARF WATER LETTUCE IS NOW UP FOR SALE!

[note: slightly higher price than last time due to USPS increasing their shipping charges]

  • One dozen individual plants + extra baby plants = $12.95 shipped
  • Add $5.50 for each additional dozen (i.e. two dozen = $18.45 shipped)

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Keep reading

WORLD BUILDING JUNE EPISODE 12 AND 13: FAUNA & FLORA

They’re kind of linked concepts, so I’ll be talking about fauna and flora in one megapost instead of 2 separate days.

As I’ve mentioned before, the sun is dimmer on Perigean Tide’s earth than on real life earth, and the flora and fauna have adapted accordingly.

Leafy, photosynthesizing plants are still a thing, but they’re a much smaller portion of plants than on irl earth because there’s less sun and so photosynthesis isn’t as viable. The photosynthesizing plants they have are low-light, akin to spider plants or ferns. Instead, carnivorous plants and fungi have taken over some of the ecological niches that purely photosynthesizing plants and grasses have. Fungi are especially plentiful in “forest” areas with more humidity and rainfall and can grow to massive sizes.

In some seaside areas, corals and anemone type creatures have evolved to live on land as well (as you can see a little bit in the coastal biome pic from earlier). It might not make perfect evolutionary sense especially for the corals, but dang if it doesn’t create a distinct otherworldly aesthetic…

The fauna varies from recognizable to “familiar, but different” to “idk what that is.” Many creatures make use of echolocation, bioluminescence, low-light vision or other adaptations that make living on a planet with a crummy sun viable.

The least changed animals are domestic dogs and cats, as their domesticated nature and prevalence has left them comparatively unchanged from the environmental shift the apocalypse brought. As a side note, breed diversity in dogs is much less exaggerated than say, present day dog breeding. There’s no AKC enforcing aesthetic standards and dogs are typically bred for and judged on their function rather than coat pattern or ear shape. The idea of a “purebred” dog is pretty weird—the closest thing to a widespread purebred dog breed is the glass-eyed starehound, which can essentially sniff out psionic energy and lunar radiation. This is because the mutation is valuable and very recessive so the easiest way to get more is inbreeding. I have a lot more on dogs, but this isn’t about only dogs… I will say that there’s another important “breed” called the fighthound, but it’s more of a blanket term for any big beefy dog with a mysotatin mutation.

Other animals are much less familiar. We have the “familiar unfamiliar” in the form of things like rats, birds, and wolves, and then we have dragons, cockatrices, and other oddities… btw, if you mentioned the idea of a dog/wolf hybrid to someone from the PT world they would be baffled.

(Dragons and cockatrices are livestock. More on that when we get to episode 14.)

Then, we have “monsters.” Monster is not a scientific category, but is instead used to refer to notably aggressive or disturbing fauna, creatures that are difficult to classify or defies existing scientific knowledge or logic, lycomorphs, and spectres, which I haven’t talked about yet but will when I go into more detail about how psionic powers work.