low light plants

anonymous asked:

heyyy! okay so i am just completely new to this and i really dont even know where to start. is there anyway you could help me out by telling me what i should research or literally anything you can tell me would be helpful too.

I’m going to assume you are talking about the green path specifically, and not witchcraft in general. There’s a lot of generic how-to guides on tumblr on witchcraft, so I’m going to give you something a bit more specific. Sooo here it goes! :)

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~Naomi’s Guide to Beginner Green Witchcraft~


1)Start a journal. Write it in everytime you study. I call mine a Book of Mirrors, because I’m reflecting on what I have learned/read. Anytime you have new ideas or thoughts about a concept, write them down. This helps you process and remember the information, and sometimes you’ll find that while writing you’ll make connections to previous things you’ve written about. It’s not your grimoire, it’s your workbook, where you place your field notes to sift through later to put into your grimoire.  I like using an a5 sized notebook that has about 200 pages or so in it.

2) Read as much as you can. Ask questions to as many people as you can, even if it’s just online. As much knowledge is available to you, look for it, and read it with a level of skepticism. Reflect on it in your journal. There’s a lot of rules and explanations on how things work in different practices, and many contradict each other. Don’t read something and take it at face value, make sure you find out why and understand the reasoning.

Don’t know what to read? Look online for reviews and then just pick something. Go to goodreads or amazon. See what stands out and read up on it. You’ll get a better idea of your interests that way. The first book I read (on green witchery) was Green Witchcraft by Ann Moura, which is a bit (a lot) disorganized, and has some historical innaccuracies due to her accounts being from word of mouth passed down in her family. But it sparked my interest and gave me a starting point, and that’s really all you need. Don’t focus so much on “What is the best way” because there’s no answer for that. You have to figure it out yourself.

3) Practice shielding, daily if you can. This is the best best best way to start trying to practice with energy work, because it can’t really backfire on you, and you need to know how to do it anyways. At worst your protection is just going to be a bit weak. Now there are hundreds of methods to this, so I suggest researching that to find a method that works great for you.

4) Research local plant life. See what’s invasive, what needs to be cared for or is in short supply. Find out what is harming the environment in your area, and if there is a way you can make your life more ethical. I say ethical instead of environmentally friendly, because people are living creatures too, and they should concern you just as much. You don’t have to be a martyr or put yourself through undue hardship, just see if there’s anywhere you can improve. Look up magickal properties and safety precautions. DO NOT CONSUME ANYTHING WITHOUT FIRST KNOWING EXACTLY WHAT IT IS. If a plant is totally foreign it’s actually best to not even touch it, ask anyone who didn’t know what poison ivy looks like. Plants are medicines. They have contraindications and dosages. Some are extremely poisonous.

5) If you don’t have any, some basic garden knowledge is something you’re going to want. The plants physical needs are very very very important.

6) Speaking of plant research, double and triple check all of your sources. There’s plenty of “good” herbal books out there that fail to mention certain things, or flat out mix up information and plant names. Given that a lot of beneficial plants have poisonous counterparts that look similiar, this is really, really, important.

7) Go into your yard and talk to the plants out there - they live right by you, it’s okay to go say hi! Don’t have a yard? Go pick yourself up a potted plant. If you are particularly sunlight access starved, there are a lot of indoor low light plants, you can find something. Introduce yourself, ask if you can talk. See if you can sense a response! It’s okay if you don’t. Some plants are just quiet and won’t “talk” until they know you, and sometimes you just can’t “hear” them yet. It takes practice! I put those words in quotes because it’s not like you’re going to hear sentences outloud. It’s like suddenly feeling an emotion, or a texture, like soft and warm, or prickly and sharp (which means they want to be left alone, by the way). Keep this relationship up. Tend to them, leave offerings if you find yourself developing a working relationship, or if you harvest some of the plant for use. A good rule is to not take more than 30% of the mass, unless you’re growing the crop specifically for consumption, like vegetables and the like.

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Starting these steps should really get your foot in the door on how green witchcraft works and how it will work for you. My practice is really personal, I do things a specific way that I developed myself when it comes to casting spells. The best I can do is send you on a path to figure it out for yourself. Take this as a gentle guide, not a hard rule book, and good luck on your journey! <3 

Betta Care Guide: All About Bettas!

The “Betta Basics”
-2.5+ gallon tank
-heater (76-82F)
-thermometer
-low-flow filter
-1+ hide
-decor
-silk/live plants
-quality food

A More Comprehensive Guide

***Tank Size***

2.5 gallons:
The absolute minimum, I do not recommend keeping a betta in anything less than this because even in a cycled 2.5, keeping a *stable* cycle is very difficult, and requires more frequent water changes. In a tank this small, you’ll most likely need to buy an adjustable heater as well, since the smallest (trustworthy) heaters on the market are 7-7.5 watts, and depending on where you live or how hot/cold you keep your house/room, the heat will fluctuate too often, or be too hot or too cold since the volume of water is quite small. A 2.5 gallon betta tank is doable.

5 gallons:
A great median for those who want to give their bettas a wonderful environment, but may be cramped on space, move around often, or whose living arrangements have aquarium-related restrictions. A cycled 5 gallon tank with a betta generally requires a water change 1x a week. A 5 gallon is also easier to heat and keep a stable cycle with a 5 gallon than a 2.5 gallon. I still recommend an adjustable heater (I’ll always recommend an adjustable heater), though, as I’ve found that even with an appropriately-sized preset heater/non-adjustable heater, the temperature fluctuates too often and by too much. A 5 gallon is a perfectly good choice!

10 gallons:
A palace! Your new betta would love to have a 10+ gallon tank! They’ll swim over every inch of it, I promise its not too big. A fantastic choice for those that have the space and can afford to set up a 10 gallon or larger with all the bells and whistles (décor, filter, heater, etc.).

note: If you feel you can’t give your betta a 10+ gallon tank, and you can only afford a 2.5 or 5 gallon setup (or something in between), that DOES NOT mean I (or anyone else) think you’re a bad fish parent ❤ as long as you can provide the basic necessities your fish requires and keep on top of water quality, then do what you can when you can! Maybe it’ll be a few months before you can buy your fish that new hide or a few extra plants, or maybe you’ll have to wait ‘til xmas or your bday to be able to afford a larger tank if that’s what you want, and that’s okay. As long as you do the best within your means (provided your animal’s basic needs are met), that’s all your fish would ask of you ❤

***Temperature***
Bettas are tropical fish! That means they require temperatures of 76-82F.

Why do they need this temperature range, though? Well, fish are ectothermic (“cold-blooded”) meaning that they depend on their surrounding environment (the water) to regulate their body temperatures! Your human body also requires a certain body temperature to optimize all those bodily functions it performs. Think about frostbite (affects circulation) or hypothermia (affects body temperature and bodily function). Your fish can suffer similar effects when its water is kept too cold. A cold betta will be more prone to fin rot/melt (the tips of the fins become necrotic) because their circulation is affected. A colder fish will also have a slower digestive process and slower metabolism, meaning that it will become lethargic because it’s organs can’t work fast enough to produce energy it needs to be healthy and active. You wanna see a bright colorful active betta? Give them a heated tank! 😃

***Thermometer***
Even if you have an adjustable heater, you should invest in a thermometer (1.50$, glass, Walmart)! I personally use an adjustable thermometer, which has an internal thermostat which tells it when to shut off/on, but when I set the heater to 79, my tanks stay around 82F, but I wouldn’t know that unless I had a thermometer to let me know what the actual tank temperature is! I definitely recommend spending the extra buck for one :)

Also, those sticker ones that go on the outside of the tank are not reliable, seeing as they go on the outside of the tank, and show a range of temperatures more or less. They cost about the same as a glass one (which is much more accurate), so I recommend either glass or digital, but not the stickers.

Filtration:
Bettas aren’t fond of tons of flow, which can present some challenges to your friendly neighborhood aquarist. Luckily, there are plenty of options when it comes to betta-safe filtration.

HOBs:
Hang-On-Back style filters. Some have an intake pipe, which should be covered with a sponge to keep your bettas fins (or the betta itself) from being sucked up and shredded/injured. You can search for “pre-filter sponge” or “intake filter sponge” on amazon, google, or find a fluval prefilter sponge at your local petsmart/Petco. You can also DIY one out of cut-to-size filter foam/sponge. HOB filters can also have a strong out-flow. Some have spray bars, some have spickets, and some just have a wide-mouth waterfall-style opening. If you find that the flow is pushing your betta around, or your betta is struggling to swim against the current, you can baffle it! Some common techniques for baffling filters are the “water-bottle baffle”, using a shower loofa/pouf, covering the out-flow opening with filter sponge/floss, or an intake sponge. I have the fluval spec v and I use an intake sponge on the out-spout since it’s a short spigot.

Sponge Filters:
These are block sponges which usually sit on the bottom of the aquarium and are hooked up to an airline tube and air pump. They push air through the sponge, creating a vacuum and pulling water through. The air bubbles that come out of the top of the sponge don’t create much horizontal flow that pushes bettas around, but instead the water flow is directed upwards. The bubbles provide oxygenation and surface agitation as well.

***Décor***

Hides:
Bettas like to feel safe (as do all fish and other pets) and giving them at least one cave to retreat to will give your fish that sense of security. You can buy something from the fish store, a local pet store, or a pet chain store. Besides the pre-made ones (logs, rock caves, skulls, etc.), you can buy terra cotta pots for around a 1$ or so. Just make sure that the pots aren’t just painted brown, but that they’re a terra cotta material all the way through. Fish have also gotten stuck in the small drainage holes at the bottom of these pots, so be sure to plug it up with some aquarium-safe silicone or something. Also, be sure to make sure that your hides don’t have sharp edges your betta could tear his/her fins on, and that the hide doesn’t have holes that your betta may get stuck in. Usually you can sand down rough edges though :)

Plants:
Plastic plants are generally a no-no, as they can tear your bettas fins. Usually, if they pass the “panty-hose” test they are deemed “betta-safe” but it’s still better not to chance it when there are plenty of gorgeous silk plants out there! “silk” plants are made from material (not necessarily silk) instead of plastic. Silk plants may have plastic stems, but that’s ok so long as there aren’t any sharp seams; the silk leaves are what’s important here!

Live plants are also an option. Anubias, anacharis, java fern, moss, and banana plants are all low-light plants which require no CO2 and no special substrate. However, this is not a plant guide so you’ll have to research how you can plant them or add them to your tank on your own.

***Food***
There are lots of food which is marked specially for bettas, but don’t fall for marketing gimmicks! Know what’s in your pet’s food before you buy. If the first few ingredients are “meal”s (fish meal, wheat meal, etc.) or the first few ingredients are plant-based, then this is not the food for your betta.
What you want to look for is whole ingredients, or specifically-named ingredients (whole fish, halibut, salmon, krill, etc.). New Life Spectrum and Omega One are good brands to check out. Hikari is ok, but their ingredients are not as quality as they used to be, and if you read the ingredients on their current “Betta Bio-Gold” you’ll see what I mean. Foods with fillers/freeze-dried foods don’t have a lot of nutritional value, and while a freeze-dried food may make a tasty treat, it shouldn’t be your fish’s staple diet. You can also feed frozen/live blood worms, mysis shrimp, etc. Bettas are insectivores, and cannot digest plant matter, so they should not be given any type of algae wafer or vegetables (this includes peas; an alternative to feeding peas for bloat is to feed daphnia!!).

***Tankmates***
I’ll preface this section by stating that bettas don’t need tankmates! :) Tankmates are more for you than for your fish, and should be chosen carefully.

Tankmates in General:
-please remember to make sure that your tank is suitable for the tank mates you wish to house; you wouldn’t keep your betta in a 1 gallon unfiltered/unheated tank, so don’t do the equivalent to your betta’s tankmates  your fish are all equal, so please, please, please make sure that you put in the same amount of research and care for the tankmates that you do for your betta! make sure your tank mates have the same requirements are your betta, and their temperament won’t put your betta at risk.
-ALWAYS DO RESEARCH ON THE SPECIES YOURE CONSIDERING BEFORE PURCHASING!! :)
-always have a backup plan in case your tankmates don’t get along with your betta, or your betta doesn’t get along with his tankmates 
-a 20 gallon is the best minimum choice for a community-style betta tank, as it opens up more options and gives your betta and his/her tankmates plenty of space!
-be prepared to separate/rehome/etc. “problem fish” or a “problem betta”. if your betta isn’t really the community type, don’t try to force him/her to be; it won’t work out well for anyone. Get that betta an individual setup as soon as possible, or if your tank is large enough, divide it so that your betta has his/her own space. 

Good Tank Mates:

 Corydoras:
shoaling, 6+ to a group - keeping them in groups smaller than this will stress them to death…literally sometimes
10+ gallons (dwarf/pygmy), 20+ gallons (regular)
tropical, lots of species to choose from
sand/barebottom is a MUST - p they have soft bellies and sensitive barbels, and gravel can scratch up their bellies (which leads to stress or infection) or damage their barbels o.o also, they sift through sand to find little bits of food naturally, so sand lets them display this natural behavior and you get to see it too!

Rasboras:
schooling, 6+ to a school – keeping them in schools smaller than this will stress out the fish
10-15+ gallons – depending on the species
tropical, lots of species to choose from
note: “galaxy rasboras” are NOT rasboras (rasboras belong to the boraras genus). Galaxy rasboras are actually a species of danio (other common name: celestial pearl danio) and are not tropical.

Snails:
under 10 gallons: nerites, ramshorns, horned nerites, and other small snails
10+ gallons: mystery snails & other snails listed above – mystery snails get quite large and have a bioload as large, if not larger, than your betta’s, so a mystery snail is more suited to living in a 10 gallon tank than in something smaller

shrimp:
not all bettas are “shrimp-safe”, meaning that if you want to try shrimp, you should be prepared for the worst case scenario: your betta eats them! if youre okay with the possibility that you may lose some shrimp, then i suggest starting out with a few shrimp.
Amano shrimp are larger, great for algae, should be kept in groups of at least 3-5
cherry shrimp (and other neocardinia sp.) are hardy, but small (most likely to be a tasty snack), colorful/many variations to choose from!
ghost shrimp can actually be nippy, so I’d recommend against them, even though they’re pretty cheap~
putting shrimp in a 2.5 gallon tank is doable, but a 5 gallon tank would be much better

otocinclus:
do best in groups, 3+ - they’re not traditional shoaling or schooling fish, but are still social
20+ gallons - otos are sensitive to water quality
if your tank doesn’t have a ton of algae for them to eat, then I suggest supplementing their diet with cucumbers/zucchini/algae wafers/etc.  

plecos:
tank size depends completely on the species your considering, there are a ton!!
I suggest supplementing their diet with cucumbers/zucchini/algae wafers/etc. 

ember tetras:
schooling, 6+ to a school – keeping the in schools smaller than this will stress out the fish
10+ gallons – they do ok in a 10, but would prefer a 15 (long) or a 20 gallon! 😊

Bad Tank Mates:
danios:
NOT tropical (max temp is like 74F), they’re schooling (6+ fish in a group), and are insanely active! this means they need at least a 20 gallon, and need to be with other cooler/temperate water fish like other danios and minnows :) Also, even if they could do ok in a heated 10 gallon, their active nature tends to stress bettas out :/

White Cloud Mountain Minnows (or any other minnows):
NOT tropical (max temp is around 74F), they’re schooling (6+ fish in a group), and are insanely active! They’re smaller, around 1”, but they need at least a 10 gallon, and should only be housed with other cooler/temperate water fish such as other danios and minnows :) Also, even if they could do ok in a heated 10 gallon, their active nature tends to stress bettas out :/

Neon Tetras:
they’re tropical, could do ok in a 10 (but would do better in a 20). Enough people have had fin-nipping/aggression issues that they’ve made this list. Not everyone who houses bettas with neon tetras will have these issues, but if there’s a possibility of putting your fish’s health and wellbeing at risk, why take the risk? There are plenty of other safer, more suitable tank mates out there 😊

all other tetras not mentioned:
tetras tend to be nippy in general (black skirt tetras, for example) and there are safer options out there; dont risk it! <3

mollies:
get too large to be housed safely with bettas
can be aggressive/attack/bully your betta

platies:
some peoples bettas seem to do ok, some do not, as they can be nippy or aggressive towards your betta

Guppies/endlers:
their flowing tails and bright colors also tend to bring out aggression, and since they have such pretty tails, they may be nipped at by your betta, or vice versa

/*Thanks for giving that book a read! If you feel as though I’ve provided inaccurate information, could make an improement, or have an addition to suggest, feel free to let me know! :3*/

HAPPY FISHKEEPING

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@ranaspkillnarieth asked to see photos of my tanks!
The top 4 are all the same tank over the years. I’ve had this tank since 2001 and it’s constantly evolving. It’s a 54 gallon corner tank with curved glass and has been a nightmare to light properly due to its shape (like a wedge of pie). It’s currently high-tech; custom CO2 rig with in-line diffusion, custom lighting rig (LED and T5), canister filter. Right now it’s plants only.
The next three are of my 12 gallon tank. I’ve had this tank since 2003 I believe. It’s been my shrimp-only tank for most of its life (well, okay, some snails too). Medium tech, with built in filter/sump, medium grade LED lighting with a heater. It too evolves over time, visually!
The last two photos are of my 8 gallon tank, I’ve had for a few years now. This is my betta tank! Built in sump filter, low grade LED lighting, heater.

WORLD BUILDING JUNE EPISODE 12 AND 13: FAUNA & FLORA

They’re kind of linked concepts, so I’ll be talking about fauna and flora in one megapost instead of 2 separate days.

As I’ve mentioned before, the sun is dimmer on Perigean Tide’s earth than on real life earth, and the flora and fauna have adapted accordingly.

Leafy, photosynthesizing plants are still a thing, but they’re a much smaller portion of plants than on irl earth because there’s less sun and so photosynthesis isn’t as viable. The photosynthesizing plants they have are low-light, akin to spider plants or ferns. Instead, carnivorous plants and fungi have taken over some of the ecological niches that purely photosynthesizing plants and grasses have. Fungi are especially plentiful in “forest” areas with more humidity and rainfall and can grow to massive sizes.

In some seaside areas, corals and anemone type creatures have evolved to live on land as well (as you can see a little bit in the coastal biome pic from earlier). It might not make perfect evolutionary sense especially for the corals, but dang if it doesn’t create a distinct otherworldly aesthetic…

The fauna varies from recognizable to “familiar, but different” to “idk what that is.” Many creatures make use of echolocation, bioluminescence, low-light vision or other adaptations that make living on a planet with a crummy sun viable.

The least changed animals are domestic dogs and cats, as their domesticated nature and prevalence has left them comparatively unchanged from the environmental shift the apocalypse brought. As a side note, breed diversity in dogs is much less exaggerated than say, present day dog breeding. There’s no AKC enforcing aesthetic standards and dogs are typically bred for and judged on their function rather than coat pattern or ear shape. The idea of a “purebred” dog is pretty weird—the closest thing to a widespread purebred dog breed is the glass-eyed starehound, which can essentially sniff out psionic energy and lunar radiation. This is because the mutation is valuable and very recessive so the easiest way to get more is inbreeding. I have a lot more on dogs, but this isn’t about only dogs… I will say that there’s another important “breed” called the fighthound, but it’s more of a blanket term for any big beefy dog with a mysotatin mutation.

Other animals are much less familiar. We have the “familiar unfamiliar” in the form of things like rats, birds, and wolves, and then we have dragons, cockatrices, and other oddities… btw, if you mentioned the idea of a dog/wolf hybrid to someone from the PT world they would be baffled.

(Dragons and cockatrices are livestock. More on that when we get to episode 14.)

Then, we have “monsters.” Monster is not a scientific category, but is instead used to refer to notably aggressive or disturbing fauna, creatures that are difficult to classify or defies existing scientific knowledge or logic, lycomorphs, and spectres, which I haven’t talked about yet but will when I go into more detail about how psionic powers work.

7 Tips for Building a Simple Betta Tank

Making your tank beautiful (and keeping the fish healthy and thriving) does not have to be hard!

I absolutely love bettas, and chances are that if you’re reading this, you love bettas, too.

Bettas are known for their vibrant colours and feisty personalities. Because they are so hardy, many people get them as first-time pets. However, to keep things simple while also ensuring that your betta is healthy and thriving, it is important to do your research beforehand. With my experience and research, I’d like to pass along 7 tips for building a simple betta tank:

Keep reading

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Epipremnum aureum (devil’s ivy, a very commonly cultivated houseplant), used here to illustrate the effects of light levels on variegation. Both leaves are growing on the same plant at the same time. 

In the top image is a leaf that grew in shade and in the bottom image is one that grew in direct light (about 1.5m away from a south-facing window). Since it needs to use as much of its surface area as possible to photosynthesize, the shade leaf doesn’t have the opportunity to give space over to areas lacking chlorophyll. It’s also smaller; not developed to its maximum size. 

Devil’s ivy is a great houseplant because it tolerates very low light, but it does not thrive in it. It has a climbing/creeping habit though, and will work to locate brighter light (as many plants do, using phototropism). In my experience, it grows best with at least a few hours of direct (indoor/filtered) sunlight. 

aph-bermuda  asked:

Do you have any tips for a broke, teenaged greenery witchling thats just starting her craft?

A couple

-herbs, pretty easy to give mundane reasons for needing them (cooking, tea)

-start a garden, also easy to give mundane reasons for (fresh food, bees)

-find some low light plants to put in bathrooms, dark bedrooms, etc

V IMPORTANT- make sure none of your pets or you, yourself are allergic to them, it doesn’t matter how cool & great it is, if you buy it, snakes will start manifesting in your house

Feel free to add

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Watering a pothos ‘marble queen’: a thoroughly watered plant has firm, bouncy foliage. Once leaves are restored to their perky state, it’s best to get rid of excess drainage water; this applies mostly to tropical foliage plants. Low light = low rate of photosynthesis; thus, low rate of water usage. If this left over water isn’t used up quick enough, several things may happen: water-borne organisms can multiply and cause root rot, cells in the leaves rupture and cause leaf tips to turn dark brown (as opposed to light brown and crispy), fungus gnats breed, etc. Best solution: brighter light! #pothos #pothosmarblequeen #houseplanttips #houseplants #indoorplants #houseplantsofinstagram #plantsmakepeoplehappy #plantlove #plantlife #plantsofinstagram #plantstagram #botanical #botany #greenery #foliage #leaflove #leaf #urbanjunglebloggers

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Please excuse the ugly 70s decor, but I wanted to share what’s growing on my bathroom windowsill at the moment. On the left is a rubber plant (Ficus elastica variegata), which is a commonly-grown houseplant as it is tolerant of a wide range of indoor conditions. They can grow huge but I’ve kept this one in a small pot, and I might cut off the top when it grows above the top of the window, so that it branches instead. 
The other three pots contain Phlebodium aureum ‘Blue Star’, so named because of its glaucous foliage… which doesn’t show up well here because of the light shining through the leaves. It’s native to tropical regions of the Americas and is an epiphyte, but I find that (much like Christmas cacti) it grows very well in compost with a good amount of bark mixed in. 
I wanted to show that it’s possible to green up places with lower light and high humidity. This window faces north so it never gets direct sun, and it’s right next to the shower so the air is frequently damp. I perhaps wouldn’t have immediately chosen the rubber plant for this location but there was nowhere else for that to go, whereas ferns would be my first choice for a location such as this. Chlorophytum, Aspidistra and several orchid species would also be appropriate here.
tl;dr ferns are an excellent choice for bathrooms.