loving-vs-virginia

“48 years ago the US Supreme Court struck down laws banning interracial marriage. This month, it may rule in favor of full marriage equality. We celebrate the Lovings and all who fought for the right to love.”

As seen on the  Southern Poverty Law Center Facebook page

Happy Loving Day!!! This day marks the anniversary of the Supreme Court ruling that resulted in interracial marriage becoming legal in 16 states on June 12th, 1967. This ruling was only 47 years ago! Such an amazing feat for these 2 people who just wanted to live their lives like everyone else. I couldn’t even imagine what it was like for the Lovings. I appreciate what they have done for all interracial couples. 

Despite this, Beau and I have still had our fair share of resistance.  The stares, the whispers, the “is this together or separate” remarks when we’re out. Throughout it all, he holds my hand tighter, pulls me closer, protects, and defends us. So thank you, Richard and Mildred. Thank you for allowing your marriage to be an integral part of our history and allowing so many others to love freely.

Marriage is one of the “basic civil rights of man,” fundamental to our very existence and survival…. To deny this fundamental freedom on so unsupportable a basis as the racial classifications embodied in these statutes, classifications so directly subversive of the principle of equality at the heart of the Fourteenth Amendment, is surely to deprive all the State’s citizens of liberty without due process of law. 

-Loving v. Virginia, June 12, 1967

My Other Parents, my Emergency Backup Parents, were married October 12, 1968. They lived in New York, not Virginia, and they weren’t first in line at the courthouse, but it was still a fresh and new thing. 

My sister and her husband were married April 19, 2008, in the same tiny 99.7% white college town in upstate NY where my Other Parents met. Nobody batted an eye.

No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice, and family. In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than once they were. As some of the petitioners in these cases demonstrate, marriage embodies a love that may endure even past death. It would misunderstand these men and women to say they disrespect the idea of marriage. Their plea is that they do respect it, respect it so deeply that they seek to find its fulfillment for themselves. Their hope is not to be condemned to live in loneliness, excluded from one of civilization’s oldest institutions. They ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law. The Constitution grants them that right. 

-Obergefell v. Hodges, June 26, 2015

The funny thing is, I will almost certianly never get married–or at least, not any more married than I am now (although we’ve been talking about living together, ish, maybe, in the future). But to know that I have the right–to know that my kind of love is recognised as valid and real–to know that Girl Weasley can marry the woman she loves and nobody will bat an eye–

I am not yet tired of marriage equality.

From Progress Iowa

“Banning slavery. Banning segregation. Recognizing marriage equality. Iowa has been ahead of the curve, and first in the nation for equality – SHARE to show your Iowa Pride!” 

Iowa also legalized interracial marriage in 1851, 116 years before the U.S. Supreme Court “Loving vs. Virginia” decision in 1967.

More info on Iowa’s progressive history

Still on my Loving Day kick! Such an amazing feat for the Lovings to achieve when they just wanted to live their lives like everyone else. I couldn’t even imagine what it was like for them. I appreciate what they have done for all interracial couples. 

I love this man with all my heart. My heart swells everyday because I get to wake up next to him.  I’ve taken some time to stop and reflect on the little difference we have, and my gratitude for the fact that it doesn’t keep us apart. I can’t imagine not being with my fiance’ because of some irrational law, and people who thought us loving one another was wrong. Just because of our genetics… How we look. Isn’t that ridiculous?

“Surrounded as I am now by wonderful children and grandchildren, not a day goes by that I don’t think of Richard and our love, our right to marry, and how much it meant to me to have that freedom to marry the person precious to me, even if others thought he was the "wrong kind of person” for me to marry. I believe all Americans, no matter their race, no matter their sex, no matter their sexual orientation, should have that same freedom to marry. Government has no business imposing some people’s religious beliefs over others. Especially if it denies people’s civil rights.

I am still not a political person, but I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, black or white, young or old, gay or straight seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.“

Mildred Loving 

JUNE 12, 1967

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY..

The United States Supreme Court ruled in favor of the plantiffs in the case of Loving vs. Virigina. The case was brought by Richard and Mildred Loving, a Virgina married couple. The Lovings were asleep in their bed when police broke in and arrested them, charging them with “cohabitating as man and wife, against the peace and dignity of the Commonwealth”. The Lovings were sentenced to a year in jail because he was classified as “white” and she was classified as “colored”

As a result, the landmark civil rights ruling invalidated all state laws prohibiting interracial marriages. At the time, less than 5% of Americans approved of interracial marriage. The ruling led to a huge increase in interracial relationships, and a new accpetance of 88% of the population.

On this installment of Practically Speaking, host Audra Wilson explores the groundbreaking case of Loving vs. State of Virginia. It’s the 1967 case that made it legal for Richard and Mildred Loving (and interracial couples throughout the United States) to marry.

Then, we revisit Alex Thibodeau’s story of finding identity while growing up biracial in Detroit. His father was absent, and growing up, he tried to figure out what it meant to “be black.”

We also hear audio captured by Audra from her trip to New Mexico. She talks to Chris and Bird, two people who are learning that sometimes our differences can make our relationships stronger.

Practically Speaking airs fresh episodes Fridays and Saturdays at 11am CST on vocalo.org, and over the air at 89.5fm and 90.7fm in Chicago. Visit vocalo.org and press play.

aclu.org
A Loving Reality for All
The month of June represents a double anniversary for Mildred and Richard Loving. Two weeks ago, the Virginia couple would have celebrated their 55th wedding anniversary. And earlier this week on June 12th, Americans celebrated the 46th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision which bears their name, Loving v. Virginia, and which recognized an equal right to marriage for all people, regardless of race.

http://www.freedomtomarry.org/pdfs/mildred_loving-statement.pdf

“Surrounded as I am now by wonderful children and grandchildren, not a day goes by that I don’t think of Richard and our love, our right to marry, and how much it meant to me to have that freedom to marry the person precious to me, even if others thought he was the ‘wrong kind of person’ for me to marry. I believe all Americans, no matter their race, no matter their sex, no matter their sexual orientation, should have that same freedom to marry. Government has no business imposing some people’s religious beliefs over others. Especially if it denies people’s civil rights.”

Surrounded as I am now by wonderful children and grandchildren, not a day goes by that I don’t think of Richard and our love, our right to marry, and how much it meant to me to have that freedom to marry the person precious to me, even if others thought he was the “wrong kind of person” for me to marry. I believe all Americans, no matter their race, no matter their sex, no matter their sexual orientation, should have that same freedom to marry. Government has no business imposing some people’s religious beliefs over others. Especially if it denies people’s civil rights.
I am still not a political person, but I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, black or white, young or old, gay or straight seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.
—  Mildred Loving

Las fotos de los Loving, la pareja que logró que EE UU admitiese los matrimonios interraciales

  • Después de años de litigio, los Loving lograron que el Supremo derogase en 1967 las leyes que prohibían el matrimonio entre personas de distinta raza.
  • Mildred, negra, y Richard, blanco, vivían en Virginia, uno de los 16 estados que consideraban delictivo el enlace interracial.
  • El fotógrafo sudafricano Grey Villet convivió con la pareja y sus tres hijos.
slate.com
Happy Loving Day! Get Déjà Vu Listening to Opponents of Interracial Marriage Argue at the Supreme Court.

Forty-seven years ago today, the Supreme Court handed down its opinion in Loving v. Virginia, striking down all interracial marriage bans as a violation of the 14th Amendment. The famous case has since served as the cornerstone of the legal battle for marriage equality: Gay marriage proponents seized upon Loving’s due process and…

As a multiracial American, I am especially grateful for the activists and legislators who fought against anti-miscegenation laws. If not for them, I may have never been born. On the 47th anniversary of Loving v. Virginia, let’s listen to opponents of interracial marriage compared with opponents of same-sex marriage. The last example (how it will “hurt” the children) weirds me out.

Same-sex marriage needs to be legal nationwide, the same way anti-miscegenation laws needed to be abolished in the remaining states.