love this scene to bits

3


“Here’s a real question: how have you survived this long when you’re so violently self-destructive?

Andrew cocked his head to one side in a question. Neil didn’t know if Andrew was playing stupid to rile him or if Andrew really was oblivious. Either way it was frustrating. He wondered why no one else had caught on, or if people noticed and just didn’t care enough to say it. Now that Neil saw it, though, he couldn’t look past it. Anytime the Foxes mentioned Andrew’s upcoming sobriety or Andrew’s name popped up in write-ups on the team’s performance at games, the focus was on what a danger he was. People talked about his trial and how it saved them from Andrew. No one said what they were doing to save Andrew from himself.

8

bonus:

So I just saw [this post] on my dash and wanted to add on but the post was already super long so. Here are some things I’ve learned from about a decade of martial arts (both practicing, competing, and teaching) that might be useful for writers:

  • If your character practices martial arts at a school, know that every school will teach that particular style a little differently. 
  • If your character doesn’t have flexibility/doesn’t stretch. they. will. hurt. themself. trying. to. kick. Even if it’s just waist-high. People who aren’t used to fighting will pull something.
  • People who have been training for a long time will have stronger hands/feet. 
  • Grappling is dirty work. You’re on the ground, you’re grabbing what you can, it’s not as hot as you might think it is.  
  • Holds/grappling/etc. are ingrained reactions. If someone grabs your wrist, reacting immediately is something that is a trained reaction. Same with throwing someone over your shoulder. The steps are practiced again and again and again until they’re gut reactions. 
  • Building off that: even if you’ve trained with a million of these drills, real life is always a little different. You have to be ready to improvise.
  • For the love of all that is holy, karate is not a universal name for martial arts. There are usually modern/sport and traditional versions of martial arts. In my experience, bits and pieces from others will mix together. (for example, I learned a lot of aikido and judo learning self-defense in taekwondo)
  • The effectiveness of the way your character fights can depend a lot on where and how they learned how to fight.
  • This may not be important for writing fight scenes in general, but just as a side note: martial arts have philosophies. If your character is trained in a particular MA, make sure to do research on that philosophy. It might be important to your characterization. 
  • Getting hit hurts. Unless you’ve been fighting for a while and are used to getting hit, you’re gonna be shocked. 
  • The most strategic person is going to lose at least 80% of their thought-process when fighting. The RDJ Sherlock Holmes fight scenes? Where he thinks everything out? Nah man. A lot of fighting is muscle memory & practiced combos. 

Ohmygod, Anne reacting to getting her first period is the most #relatable thing to ever happen on a TV show. 

Her reactions, verbatim:

  • “Please plant some pink roses on my grave.”
  • “I’m not ready to be a WOman!!!”
  • “There’s been some kind of mistake. There’s no way God would think it’s time for ME to be a woman!”
  • “This can’t be happening…”
  • “Every MONTH? But WHY?”
  • “This is a waking nightmare. I hate this.”
  • “*groans loudly*”
  • “This is SO inconvenient!”

Like I said. Relatable. 

5

one day

2

The only thing we need to worry about is the next minute. 

4

thanks for listening to me all night, clive.
i’m glad you know i’m a zombie.

While the bass is sounding, while the drums are pounding
Beatings of my broken heart will rise the first place of the charts,
My heart arranges, oh, those magic changes    

A happy Valentine’s Day to you all!

I’ve missed my babies. I’ve been waiting to do the Grease/Zutara mashup since I saw Grease Live and I loved this scene to bits. 

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