love this movie character so much

Baby Driver.

My favorite movie of the year so far. Pure. Cinema. 

I’ll write something for real but this is just me yammering my thoughts. I will avoid spoilers.

Realism is for suckers. 

It is so fucking in love with being a movie. Joy. Car chases filmed as poetry. Music as soul and pulse, Baby Driver’s heart is old Soul records from Stax and diners at 2am. Sincerity and softness expressed in a masculine genre, of all the shitty anti-heroes we get, it is nice to see someone who is nice? Who makes dinner for his Dad?. A crime film filmed like a classic musical. Stylization that inform character and theme. The camera moves like a dancer. I haven’t seen a movie so in love with music and how much that love pops off the frame and isn’t afraid of how sappy it can make us. The real cars being driven for real doing real stunts are amazing. The film is earnest and wears its heart on its sleeve in an era of cool cynicism. It makes me believe in the magic of cinema I felt as a child can still be found as a “seen it all” adult. I hope you see it on the big screen nice and loud and feel some of the joy I felt and if you don’t, we are two very different people. 

It 100% deserves the best editing oscar. 

Fuckkkkk that scene set to The Damned’s “Neat Neat Neat”

A certain scene of violence. 

That steadycam shot during the opening credits. 

The use of color during the final action scene. 

The first film I can remember being nostalgic for iPods.

The hidden cuts during the foot chase scene!

How good the blocking and compositions are!

I am sucker for stories about found families. 

balsa-the-spear-wielder  asked:

Android 18

Why I like them
God she’s just so great? She’s gorgeous and the cool Actually Stoic character (as opposed to Piccolo and Vegeta who just pretend) and she loves her family so much and she beat the shit out of Vegeta that one time and I just love her a lot

Why I don’t
Mmm I wish she was just a little more forthcoming with her feelings. Although from what I hear that’s one of the few things Super is doing well so there’s that I guess.

Favorite episode (scene if movie)
Her one scene in Resurrection F makes me happy, even if I do wish she’d actually gone to fight.

Favorite season/movie
Androids arc.

Favorite line
“He’s so cool.” GOD 18 LOVES HER HUSBAND SO MUCH

Favorite outfit
The denim vest/skirt combo was a Good Look

OTP
K18 is honestly the best canon ship and I’m willing to fight over that

Brotp
18, 17, and 16 all hanging out and being friends is my favourite thing what do you mean 16 is dead shut the fuck up and let me have my dreams

Head Canon
She feels super awkward around Chi-Chi a lot of the time because she did sort of try to kill her husband that one time. Less awkward around Goku because they can just punch all their feelings out.

Unpopular opinion
18 is more handsome than pretty. 17 is the pretty twin.

A wish
For people to stop being assholes about her relationship with Krillin? Holy shit you guys they have a great and healthy relationship let them be

An oh-god-please-dont-ever-happen
Don’t let her die in the upcoming tournament or lose Krillin

5 words to best describe them
Not so emotionless kickass mom

My nickname for them
I tag her as blonde hair bot but “the love of my life” also works

I just went to see Cars 3 and I just have to say: thank you Pixar. I grew up watching Cars, and Doc Hudson was my favourite character without question. Thank you for honouring him with this movie, and giving even more insight into this amazing character

Thank you for Lightning McQueen, and the finishing of his journey, with him coming full circle as a racer. Watching his evolution of character in the first movie always brought me to tears, and this follow-up did exactly the same.

Lastly, thank you for the characters and town of Thomasville Speedway. Louise, Smoky, Junior, and River were amazing to watch every second they were on screen. Thank you for telling their stories and bringing back the people many of us didn’t know existed until now.

From the bottom of my heart to Brian Fee, John Lasseter, and the rest of the Pixar team. Thank you.

originalbirdboy  asked:

You can't watch X-Men Apocalypse for good anyone content. But maybe I'm just bitter over fight club Warren and how he's very much not comic Warren :/

nobody in that movie is comic accurate. except maybe psylocke and only because she doesn’t speak enough to be considered out of character. I literally love psylocke so much. pointing her out was the most satisfying thing in xmen apocalypse

rhodey is the cutest person i can’t believe this,,, saying “boom” when something goes his way…Dad Jokes™… being So Into Being War Machine oh my god literally every one-liner rhodey has is life-changing i can’t believe how good he is??? “welcome to the dance floor, boys. oh no, i didn’t say you could leave” “I think it’s weird. you look like two seals fighting over a grape” “you look damn good mr president but i’m gonna need that suit back” WAR MACHINE,,,COMIN AT U,,, “no, it’s your fault, I just wanted to say I’m sorry”

he adapts so quickly to ridiculous situations he’s brave and resilient and selfless and incredible and his password is WARMACHINEROX with an x all caps what a giant dork i love him @ marvel where the fuck is my war machine movie

So I saw Guardians of the Galaxy 2

Lots of thoughts bouncing around. Some spoiler free thoughts:

  • Loved it. 
  • Gamora has a much more….consistent/fleshed out personality in this one? I love it.
  • That’s actually true of basically all the characters. Especially Drax and Gamora. 
  • Rocket steals the show. And other things he should not steal. 
  • Also Nebula. Nebula was WAY more interesting and dynamic. 
  • Really strong theme development and BEAUTIFUL color palette. DC, takes notes.
  • If I have one major complaint with the film, its that it has too many antagonistic forces, so the focus gets split. Lesson: Never more than 2 antagonists. Any more than 2 and things get dicey. 
  • Groot is so cute and the movie is very very aware of this. 
  • Mantis is very likable. 
  • Holy shit, 3 named female characters, each with their own minor character arc not directly tied to romance in the film? MARVEL STUDIOS, YOU SPOIL ME. 
  • Stay until the very very end of the credits. There’s like 5 stingers. 
Internal Conflict:  Five Conflicting Traits of a Likable Hero.

1.  Flaws and Virtues 

I’m sure you’ve heard this before, but characters without flaws are boring.  This does not, as many unfortunate souls take it to mean, imply that good, kind, or benevolent characters are boring:  it just means that without any weaknesses for you to poke at, they tend to be bland-faced wish fulfillment on the part of the author, with a tendency to just sit there without contributing much to the plot.

For any character to be successful, they need to have a proportionate amount of flaws and virtues.

Let’s take a look at Stranger Things, for example, which is practically a smorgasbord of flawed, lovable sweethearts.

We have Joyce Byers, who is strung out and unstable, yet tirelessly works to save her son, even when all conventional logic says he’s dead;  We have Officer Hopper, who is drunken and occasionally callous, yet ultimately is responsible for saving the boy’s life;  We have Jonathan, who is introspective and loving, but occasionally a bit of a creeper, and Nancy, who is outwardly shallow but proves herself to be a strong and determined character.  Even Steve, who would conventionally be the popular jerk who gets his comeuppance, isn’t beyond redemption.

And of course, we have my beloved Eleven, who’s possibly the closest thing Stranger Things has to a “quintessential” heroine.  She’s the show’s most powerful character, as well as one of the most courageous.  However, she is also the show’s largest source of conflict, as it was her powers that released the Demogorgon to begin with.  

Would Eleven be a better character if this had never happened?  Would Stranger Things be a better show?  No, because if this had never happened, Stranger Things wouldn’t even be a show.  Or if it was, it would just be about a bunch of cute kids sitting around and playing Dungeons and Dragons in a relatively peaceful town.

A character’s flaws and mistakes are intended to drive the plotline, and if they didn’t have them, there probably wouldn’t even be a plot.

So don’t be a mouth-breather:  give your good, kind characters some difficult qualities, and give your villains a few sympathetic ones.  Your work will thank you for it.

2.  Charisma and Vulnerability

Supernatural has its flaws, but likable leads are not one of them.  Fans will go to the grave defending their favorite character, consuming and producing more character-driven, fan-created content than most other TV shows’ followings put together.

So how do we inspire this kind of devotion with our own characters?  Well, for starters, let’s take a look at one of Supernatural’s most quintessentially well-liked characters:  Dean Winchester.

From the get-go, we see that Dean has charisma:  he’s confident, cocky, attractive, and skilled at what he does.  But these qualities could just as easily make him annoying and obnoxious if they weren’t counterbalanced with an equal dose of emotional vulnerability. 

As the show progresses, we see that Dean cares deeply about the people around him, particularly his younger brother, to the point of sacrificing himself so that he can live.  He goes through long periods of physical and psychological anguish for his benefit (though by all means, don’t feel obligated to send your main character to Hell for forty years), and the aftermath is depicted in painful detail.

Moreover, in spite of his outward bravado, we learn he doesn’t particularly like himself, doesn’t consider himself worthy of happiness or a fulfilling life, and of course, we have the Single Man Tear™.

So yeah, make your characters beautiful, cocky, sex gods.  Give them swagger.  Just, y’know.  Hurt them in equal measure.  Torture them.  Give them insecurities.  Make them cry.  

Just whatever you do, let them be openly bisexual.  Subtext is so last season.

3.  Goals For the Future and Regrets From the Past

Let’s take a look at Shadow Moon from American Gods.  (For now, I’ll have to be relegate myself to examples from the book, because I haven’t had the chance to watch the amazing looking TV show.) 

Right off the bat, we learn that Shadow has done three years in prison for a crime he may or may not have actually committed.  (We learn later that he actually did commit the crime, but that it was only in response to being wronged by the true perpetrators.)  

He’s still suffering the consequences of his actions when we meet him, and arguably, for the most of the book:  because he’s in prison, his wife has an affair (I still maintain that Laura could have resisted the temptation to be adulterous if she felt like it, but that’s not the issue here) and is killed while mid-coital with his best friend.

Shadow is haunted by this for the rest of the book, to the point at which it bothers him more than the supernatural happenings surrounding him.  

Even before that, the more we learn about Shadow’s past, the more we learn about the challenges he faced:  he was bullied as a child, considered to be “just a big, dumb guy” as an adult, and is still wrongfully pursued for crimes he was only circumstantially involved in.

But these difficulties make the reader empathize with Shadow, and care about what happens to him.  We root for Shadow as he tags along with the mysterious and alternatively peckish and charismatic Wednesday, and as he continuously pursues a means to permanently bring Laura back to life.

He has past traumas, present challenges, and at least one goal that propels him towards the future.  It also helps that he’s three-dimensional, well-written, and as of now, portrayed by an incredibly attractive actor.

Of course (SPOILER ALERT), Shadow never does succeed in fully resurrecting Laura, ultimately allowing her to rest instead, but that doesn’t make the resolution any less satisfying.  

Which leads to my next example…       

4.  Failure and Success 

You remember in Zootopia, when Judy Hopps decides she wants to be cop and her family and town immediately and unanimously endorse her efforts?  Or hey, do you remember Harry Potter’s idyllic childhood with his kindhearted, adoptive family?  Oh!  Or in the X-Files, when Agent Mulder presents overwhelming evidence of extraterrestrial life in the first episode and is immediately given a promotion?  No?

Yeah, me neither.  And there’s a reason for this:  ff your hero gets what they want the entire time, it will be a boring, two-dimensional fantasy that no one will want to read.  

A good story is not about the character getting what they want.  A good story is about the character’s efforts and their journey.  The destination they reach could be something far removed from what they originally thought they wanted, and could be no less (if not more so) satisfying because of it.

Let’s look at Toy Story 3, for example:  throughout the entire movie, Woody’s goal is to get his friends back to their longtime owner, Andy, so that they can accompany him to college.  He fails miserably.  None of his friends believe that Andy was trying to put them in the attic, insisting that his intent was to throw them away.  He is briefly separated from them as he is usurped by a cute little girl and his friends are left at a tyrannical daycare center, but with time and effort, they’re reunited, Woody is proven right, and things seem to be back on track.

Do his efforts pay off?  Yes – just not in the way he expected them to.  At the end of the movie, a college-bound Andy gives the toys away to a new owner who will play with them more than he will, and they say goodbye.  Is the payoff bittersweet?  Undoubtedly.  It made me cry like a little bitch in front of my young siblings.  But it’s also undoubtedly satisfying.      

So let your characters struggle.  Let them fail.  And let them not always get what they want, so long as they get what they need.  

5.  Loving and Being Loved by Others

Take a look back at this list, and all the characters on it:  a gaggle of small town kids and flawed adults, demon-busting underwear models, an ex-con and his dead wife, and a bunch of sentient toys.  What do they have in common?  Aside from the fact that they’re all well-loved heroes of their own stories, not much.

But one common element they all share is they all have people they care about, and in turn, have people who care about them.  

This allows readers and viewers to empathize with them possibly more than any of the other qualities I’ve listed thus far, as none of it means anything without the simple demonstration of human connection.

Let’s take a look at everyone’s favorite caped crusader, for example:  Batman in the cartoons and the comics is an easy to love character, whereas in the most recent movies (excluding the splendid Lego Batman Movie), not so much. 

Why is this?  In all adaptions, he’s the same mentally unstable, traumatized genius in a bat suit.  In all adaptions, he demonstrates all the qualities I listed before this:  he has flaws and virtues, charisma and vulnerability, regrets from the past and goals for the future, and usually proportionate amounts of failure and success.  

What makes the animated and comic book version so much more attractive than his big screen counterpart is the fact that he does one thing right that all live action adaptions is that he has connections and emotional dependencies on other people.  

He’s unabashed in caring for Alfred, Batgirl, and all the Robins, and yes, he extends compassion and sympathy to the villains as well, helping Harley Quinn to ultimately escape a toxic and abusive relationship, consoling Baby Doll, and staying with a child psychic with godlike powers until she died.

Cartoon Batman is not afraid to care about others.  He has a support network of people who care about him, and that’s his greatest strength.  The DC CU’s ever darker, grittier, and more isolated borderline sociopath is failing because he lacks these things.  

 And it’s also one of the reasons that the Lego Batman Movie remains so awesome.


God willing, I will be publishing fresh writing tips every week, so be sure to follow my blog and stay tuned for future advice and observations! 

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Just because it’s the path of least resistance, doesn’t mean it’s the wrong path.
Staying together is more important than how we stay together.

Natasha is the leader of the Avengers in many ways. […] In this movie, she has the most matured point of view of any of the characters. What fascinating about her is that she is a reformed villain, so she has an understanding of life in a way that other characters don’t. She has an empathy. She can see both sides in a way that not everyone else can. She is the middle ground of maturity. [Captain America Civil War Audio Commentary]

8

[It seems like your characters make kind of an odd combination.] I think when you find both of our characters, they’ve both been working together for a couple of years, so they kind of have a shorthand between them. The way they communicate is old hat. They’re sort of brought together in an unlikely, unexpected friendship. - Scarlett Johansson

I don't think people who say we're overreacting about Wonder Woman understand

When you’re a girl, you don’t get to see women be cool, not as often as boys get to see men be cool.

You don’t get to see them fly and fight bad guys and be people you want to BE, do you know what I mean?

Guys get the cool super powers and girls get romance subplots.

Girls with powers are reduced to smaller roles and we have to make up fanfics and extended material that makes them the main character cuz male writers don’t need them for anything but romance plots.

Just look at girls on Tumblr.

Obsessed with white males.

Love em.

Can’t get enough of that white guy named Chris.

Why?

I assume because they’re attractive in every socially constructed way.

And because they get to be the telekinetic, edgy angsty guy whose mom died who deserves all of our sympathy and attention.

So when people say Wonder Woman is a great movie but people are exaggerating how important it is that she be a role model, or that girls should look up to their mothers…

Like you don’t get how cool it is to be able to see someone like you do cool stuff. Your mom is great but she’s mundane, no offense to mothers. She’s not magical, she’s the kind of person you don’t appreciate until you’re older. And she’s not the type of person EVERYONE knows and recognizes and looks up to. Wonder Woman is, well now she really is. And she’s visible, she’s much more tangible, as fictional characters always ARE to mainstream audiences. So little girls get to see this awesome fictional lady…

-and you don’t have to pretend you’re a guy.

You don’t have to pretend that you’re not different from the people we’ve been told are the “desirable” people to be.

Wonder Woman is not only a great movie and a lovely social commentary.

But on a basic level, the more subconscious level of internalized feelings, of self identity and self love ?

I mean, are you a heartless monster or do you really have a problem with girls, and boys too, seeing a woman kick ass and not be the object of desire.

But the person everyone wants to be?

You show girls that they can be awesome, that they have more of a role in human existence than just being shallow love interests and you show boys that there are women they can look up to.

You got this larger than life woman acting as an icon for everyone, and for ONCE, this icon is female. Yes, the human race is represented, and idealized, in super heroes. Who are often male. Which says that our idealized self…is male.

So Wonder Woman being an idealistic superhero, our perfect self, the human shaped being we want to be…well. She’s female and BY WANTING TO BE HER…we say that there is nothing wrong with being female.

And yes yes yes yes argue that they have real life women they could look up to.

But do you really think most little boys want to learn about Madam Curie or Queen Isabella or Antoinette?

That’s boring history stuff.

Wonder Woman reaches a huge audience.

She’s more tangible, for children that is.

She feels more real than stuffy historical figures.

Stop acting like Wonder Woman being a role model is to be underplayed or devalued.

It’s important for people to feel EXCITED and exhilarated by a super hero who’s not a straight white snarky nihilistic male.

It gets their dusty little hearts beating and their minds thinking, hopefully.

Will it change anything politically, no.

Wonder Woman can’t impeach trump unfortunately.

But can it change how girls see themselves, how boys see women, how people look at what it means to be human?

Well maybe.

So TL;DR- shut up. Wonder Woman is amazing. And shame on you for trying to take her away from children, you’re a menace and I need to talk to you, adult to adult.

anonymous asked:

Please please share your thoughts on Wonder Woman? Thank you! :)

ANYONE WHO WATCHED WONDER WOMAN (2017) DIR. PATTY JENKINS AND WASN’T COMPLETELY IN LOVE IS NOT TO BE TRUSTED

Some thoughts:

  • So we all knew it was going to be emotional to FINALLY have a female superhero movie, but the movie exceeded those expectations. The fight scenes were incredible and so focused on Diana and what she was capable of – the men basically weren’t even there. The fuckin no man’s land scene SAVED MY LIFE. Superhero movies are known for being heavy handed and this one didn’t escape that for sure (the love speech at the end was….a lot), but that scene was so well done…they didn’t have to stoop to some Éowyn knock off line of “I am no man,” we were allowed to just see her do what real women do - step up and do it. Even though that wasn’t the first time we’ve seen her in full Wonder Woman costume on screen, it felt like it was, like it was the first time I’d EVER seen ANY hero before and it took my breath away. By far the best Superhero Reveal Moment I’ve ever seen. My girl taking out bullets right and left, drawing fire from the entire German army!! Fuck me up!!!
  • You can’t talk about this film without talking about gender role reversals. Chris Pine was So Perfect and I think they really couldn’t have pulled the movie off if they’d cast any other white boy in the role. He was funny but genuine, capable but never arrogant, charming but not entitled about it. He learned quickly what Diana was capable of and respected her for it, always moving to the sideline during the fight scenes (the shield moment with the bell tower comes to mind - who needs a sniper when you can fuckin launch a god at the shooter??), knowing that these were her fights and never trying to mansplain her out of them. He wanted to protect her, but didn’t underestimate her - all the things that a typical female romantic interest does in these kind of movies. It was amazingly well balanced, so much so that I didn’t even mind the romantic sub plot. Plus he was almost entirely naked there, way to play to the audience my dudes!!!!
  • The historical context did the movie such a great service. The outward displays of sexism became so ridiculous when faced with Diana, who genuinely had never had to deal with the patriarchy’s bullshit before. It didn’t just make the men in London look pathetic and mean, it cast a large shadow over the way that women are treated today. 
  • The Dark DC Gradient™ on all the shots isn’t my favorite but it did Chris Pine’s fuckin bright blue eyes a huge favor
  • Gal Gadot was so fuckin good??? Not only was she beautiful, like really really distractingly beautiful, like I kept having to force myself to pay attention to the dialogue cause I, like Steve Trevor, could not stop looking at her (and she’s standing next to Genuine Stud Chris Pine and still?? SHE’S SO BEAUTIFUL). But she was way more then that, her performance was spot on. Diana was naive, commanding, strong, compassionate - while never being reduced down to just a one note version of these things. She felt so real to me, in a genre that spends very little time on character development. Even in the sappiest parts of the script, she sold it. She absolutely sparkled. 
  • Some of the best dialogue was the back and forth between Diana and Steve when she’s asking questions about mankind/London - it was cute and funny without being too overdone or obvious, which it easily could have been
  • The villains weren’t much to write home about, but they didn’t need to be. The movie was so laser focused on Diana and Steve that they really didn’t matter, you could self insert whatever you wanted to there
  • Themyscira is the ideal for I too want to hang out on the beach and never see a man again
  • Also that lesbian line, and how stupid male reviewers blindly did not understand it!!! Fuckin drag em
  • But also the fight scenes on Themyscira were INCREDIBLE. I wish that first section had been a bit longer just because I was enjoying it so much, but it was so refreshing to see all women on screen - women who fought and loved and supported each other. Incredible. 

I haven’t enjoyed, really enjoyed, to the point of not having to think about the message or the structure or how much fuckin time I’ve wasted listening to some male superhero talk about honor or some equally boring garbage, since The Avengers came out in 2012. Even then, Wonder Woman felt like something else entirely. It leaned on many of the same tropes and sequences, but there was enough reinvention in between (particularly the characters, who I felt were much more fleshed out then any superhero movie I’ve seen before) to make it feel fresh and exciting. This so easily could have been a throw away movie, a chance for movie execs to point and say, hey we tried with women that one time!! But Patty Jenkins, and Gal Gadot, and all the other women who worked on this incredible production, knew what was at stake, and weren’t going to let that happen. Every time I see a little girl dressed up as Diana Prince, on her way to the theater, my heart fills more and more. During the film, I found myself on the verge of tears five or six times - sometimes because it was so beautiful, to see a woman who felt so real being strong and vulnerable and saving the damn world, but other times because the plot itself genuinely moved me. Wonder Woman is revolutionary for the industry, sure, but more importantly, it’s just a damn good movie. 

3

Happy early Valentine’s Day everybody! 

Somehow I managed to do a fluffy ship piece that ends in Teru crying…

At any rate, my personal headcanon is that Teru, without any actual adult role models in his life, has instead modeled himself off of the movies that he watches. Hence why he assigns everybody (himself included) a role: main character, rival, etc… However, with that comes the fact that he doesn’t have the greatest concept of love, which, let’s be honest, films generally suck at. 

As a result, he keeps saying he’s not in love with Mob, but it’s less of a denial so much as he doesn’t have a word for the way that Mob makes him feel. 

(I’m not really sure I have a word for it either. But I hope that I managed to convey it anyways.)

BLOG || ART || COMMISSIONS

Hello, survivor here who grew up with illness and disability and who loves to explore life through fictional characters because it’s a good way to think outside of your own experiences and learn and grow and also to have fun.

Can we stop pretending that unsavory fan content made by survivors is more powerful than big bucks goreporn movies coming out every year? There’s so much discourse about how someone’s geeky indulgent fanfic can cause a whole generation of sickos to feel validated by it and go commit horrible crimes but if an obscure fic is that powerful and influential because to you fiction = reality, why isn’t a musical where we root for the characters making people pies treated the same?

If fans shouldn’t be allowed to write weird or dark or gross things for coping, speculation, learning, healing, empathy, creative exercise, or just for fun just because there might be people who cannot separate fiction from reality, then why isn’t media seen by literal millions your target as well? Because individuals are easy targets and this is all performative and you don’t actually care about us, you hurt us because that’s how weak and powerless you are, you have to harass some 20 year old survivor just trying to explore things safely in the realm of fiction and act like their weird crackship fic with 800 hits is responsible for every new trauma victim created that month.

I’ve got a secret for you: telling survivors they should be ashamed of what they create and they should kill themselves because you personally are grossed out or uncomfortable with their OTP doesn’t protect them or anyone else from harm. The one doing harm is you. Stop harming real people in the name of hypotheticals. I have seen this go on for far too long. You hurt people who are already hurting. Who does that save?

Fellow survivors and even people who just like writing dark things and know that what they write isn’t reality: asking “what if?” and exploring that creatively is not a sin.

Maladaptive Daydreaming.

“Everybody does it!”

Oh. Does everybody pace back and forth for hours; index finger automatically clicking the volume up, louder, until they feel the music leak into every possible corner of their brain?

Do they see their characters dance, fight, make love or sing along with the songs they so carefully chose?

Can they watch a movie without imagining their own movie in their heads?

Does it take them hours longer to complete chores? (Dirty laundry is much less interesting than playing pretend).

Are their universes as complex as a novel? Do their character’s emotions ebb and flow like verses of poetry?

Do their daydreams terrify them?

Do they feel what their characters feel? Do they feel the slightest bit insulted that they call their teammates, their creations, their friends and family simply…characters…?

Do they think that their daydreams tease them with images of lives far more grand and exciting than the mundane grey word they’re forced by physics to live in?

Oh, dear.

Everybody daydreams.

But not all dreams are adaptive.

IMPORTANT P S A FOR ROGUE ONE FANS

chirrut imwe is a blind chinese main character in one of the biggest movie franchises in history!! he is disabled but is never seen as a burden, or at a disadvantage, or even given special treatment!!!!!!!! hes a kickass blind man who more than pulls his weight (HE SAVES EVERYONE LIKE WE LITERALLY WOULDNT HAVE ANY STAR WARS MOVIE WITHOUT HIM) and is an essential part to the rogue one crew, rebellion, temple, star wars galaxy, movie, world, galaxy, universe, etc. he deserves all ur love and appreciation!!!!!!