Fiona Goode: I have been to St. Louis No. 1, and I have seen the tomb of Laveau, seen the fat tourists from Little Rock to Hackensack drawing crosses on the bricks–making wishes to the bones of Marie Laveau. Little do they know, all they have to do to get their wishes granted was come down here to the Ninth Ward and get their hair braided.

Marie Laveau: And what is your wish, Witch?

-”AHS: Coven”


Louisiana is experiencing the worst flooding in the history of the state.

Over 7,000 people have been rescued and over 5,000 people are in shelters unable to return to their homes. In addition, over 1,000 drivers are stranded on Interstate 12 between Baton Rouge and Slidell, who today received supplies flown in via helicopter. AT&T service has been down throughout the Baton Rouge metro area. One of my former professors told me he’s been living in Louisiana for 44 years, and has never witnessed flooding this severe.

In Denham Springs (about 10 miles from Baton Rouge), the Amite river is currently at 46′ and rising. Flood stage for the river starts at 29′. 

This is bad, really bad. Places that only flood once every 500 years are flooding. Unfortunately, these are also places where people don’t have flood insurance because they don’t live in a flood plain.

There was no warning for this, at least with hurricanes we can see them coming and have time to prepare or evacuate.

Please, if you can, donate to the victims through the Red Cross. Or, if you are interested in helping with post-flood disaster assistance, please sign up with Volunteer Louisiana.

If you live in the effected area and are in need of a shelter, This Link has a list of shelters in Ascension, East Baton Rouge, Iberia, Lafayette, Livingston, St. Helena, Tangipahoa, Vermillion, West Feliciana, and Washington Parishes.

If you are in need of rescue please call:

Baker: (225) 778-0300

Baton Rouge: (225) 389-5000

Central: (225) 367-1254

Livingston Parish: (225) 686-3996

St. Helena Parish: 222-4413 - press 0

Patients in need of kidney dialysis: (225) 772-1428

The flood.

Saturday, August 13th 2016
Denham Springs, Louisiana

Me and my friends were frantically texting each other, trying to get a hold of one another. We had no idea if they had gone under or if they were okay. One of my friends texted me saying “There is no water here, I am safe.” The same friend twenty minutes later texted me saying “My house is under water.” I have never been so scared in my entire life, I had no idea if my house was going to go under or not, or if some of my friends were even still alive. Many of my friends houses were full of water, them stranded on their roofs. I watched on the news as I saw the only town I have ever lived in be destroyed by water. My high school started filling up with water. Everyone was terrified. The most sickening feeling was getting text messages saying “Kayla, I am scared. I don’t know if I am going to be okay.”

Sunday, August 14th 2016
Denham Springs, Louisiana

I woke up and looked out my window. I screamed when I saw the water had risen three feet. I ran outside to see the water was four inches from coming into my house. I checked on my friends, everyone I knew had lost everything or was stranded in their houses. There was no way to get out of my house, the water was chest deep and the currents were strong. Even if we wanted to leave, we couldn’t. We were stranded. The water started to rise, and then the rain came. The water started leaking into my house. I was scared. I was so scared. Soon after the water started coming up through the floors, the water stood at a stand-still. It stayed like that for what seemed like an eternity. I had no idea if it would rise suddenly, taking all of my belongings and memories with it, just like it did to my friend’s. The water then fell a foot. The water was no longer in my house, but stayed very high throughout the day. The threat was still there. We then began to realize that we had little food and water. We scavenged whatever we could from my house to make a small dinner for my family. I looked on the news, only to see that my school had been flooded over the roof. The school that only a few days prior I was laughing and learning at. I saw everything. I saw the neighborhoods and shops flooded up to the rooftops. I saw the children and babies being rescued by helicopters from a deadly situation. I saw the amazing Coast Guard and National Guard rescuing people by boat and helicopter. I saw residents going out, risking their own lives to save the lives of others. I saw thousands of people homeless with nothing to their name except the clothes on their backs and the children in their arms. I saw heartbreak, all across my city. All across my state. 

Monday, August 15th 2016
Denham Springs, Louisiana

Today I wake up and the water has dropped two feet. I am one of the lucky ones, and I am eternally grateful. Many of my friends remain in shelters, unable to leave. There is no way to get out of the city. The roads are flooded and broken. I am so thankful that my friends are now safe, and out of harms way. I am stranded in my home, still unable to leave. Still unable to get food. I am so saddened by this destruction and this terrible situation we are all in. The places we made these memories at may be gone, but the memories will never be washed away. My heart is broken, but my spirits are not. I know we will come out of this strong. It will take a long time to rebuild my city, but the community is stronger than ever. We must rejoice that our family and friends have come out of this alive, not be mournful of the items we have lost.

Items and buildings are replaceable but our lives are not.

A wild Pikachu appeared! People in New Orleans were surprised one day when someone had illegally installed this Pikachu statue overnight, covered it in patina to make it look like it had been there for years, and inscribed it with the hashtag #pokemonument. Nobody knows where it came from, but Pokemon GO players really enjoy visiting. Source Source 2 Source 3

Please be safe
  • Stay out of flood waters as much as you can, there are creatures lurking. Alligators, snakes, and fire-ant balls are everywhere.

  • If you are stranded or need rescue call the National Guard number at (225) 664-2397. They can get to you in a boat or helicopter.

  • Boil your water before you drink it from the tap. We are under a Boil Water Advisory.

  • Click here for a list of shelters and supply distributors. You can go to these places as a “safe-haven”. 

  • To contact the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) use this website or call 1 (800) 621-3362. 

  • If you need 911, keep calling until you get through to a person. They are overflowed with calls and it may take a few times for them to get to you.

Remember that your belongings can be replaced, but your life cannot be.


“In the aftermath to come, Americans should remain vigilant of the mainstream media’s tendency to blame-both-sides equally, regardless of the lopsided casualties of police violence. And whether or not Americans will agree or disagree with Johnson’s actions should not be the question we explore most. Focusing on his actions alone is a convenient diversionary tactic which enables America’s white supremacist power structure to delegitimize his anger and sweep the issue of state terror back under the rug. Instead, we should ask how are we going to communicate to police officers that if they wish ever again to be secure from the consequences of their violence, their top priority must be to stop terrorizing black and brown communities. That if they truly desire their own safety, they will first have to stop murdering people  —  or else more chickens, inevitably, will come home to roost.”

– Dallas Shooting: Where Peaceful Existence is Impossible, Violence is Inevitable

First of its kind "Blue Lives Matter" bill passes in Louisiana.

Louisana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) signed the “Blue Lives Matter” bill into law Thursday, making the state the first in the nation where public safety workers are considered a protected class under hate-crime law.

In many states, hate crime laws call for additional penalties for those convicted of crimes who targeted victims on the basis of race, ethnicity or religion. Targeting police officers, firefighters and emergency medical service personnel now fall under Louisiana’s hate crime law.

No other state includes police officers as a protected class under hate-crime laws, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. But at least 37 states — including Louisiana — have enhanced penalties for assaulting police officers.


It’s almost summer so it could just be a pop-up thundershower, but if I was in Louisiana I’d swear the legislature was spitting in my face.  This is rude and unnecessary on so many levels and it’s just another example of lawmakers pandering to their constituents to come up with a solution to a problem that does not exist.  (See: voter ID laws, drug testing for government benefits, etc.)

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