lots of running scenes

Some Thoughts: Storm in the Room

With the reactions post-Storm in the Room, I feel that Steven doesn’t get enough credit. Going to Rose’s Room, searching for answers, and comfort even though he didn’t know that yet, Steven wasn’t setting out to create a perfect mother or project himself the ideal version of Rose. He starts, the moment he enters the room, by saying he knew it wasn’t real.

Everything Steven did with Cloud Rose, everything that happened between them, were reasonable assumptions we could make of Rose. And this is because the Rose we saw was from Steven’s expectations of what she would be like. And Steven was wary about idealising Rose the way the Crystal Gems did. He says this explicitly several times. Also, Steven’s view of Rose was tempered early on by Greg’s stories of her. 

So the Rose we see isn’t a sad Steven’s attempt at finding the perfect mother figure. Steven’s attempt at a reasonable and believable portrayal of Rose deserves to be acknowledged. Had it not been the case, the Rose we saw could not have evoked the feelings she did. It’s because of the depth Steven introduced to her from all his memories of her that it was made possible.

And what I want to talk about in this post, is how the images of Rose reflect which narratives he’s channeling as he tries to piece together, quite literally, the image of Rose.

The first appearance of Cloud Rose shows her with messy hair, parts of it stick up and around her. Her facial expressions are often wiggly, for lack of better word, and she shows her thighs a lot more than in the succeeding scenes, either in cross-sitting or running. 

This Rose is goofy and funny and casual. And it’s the Rose whom Greg’s stories have constructed in Steven’s memories. 

The same scenes we see Rose hitch up her dress in the same way (such as when she’s reading books with Greg on the bed) or similarly goofy, like stopping a ferris wheel with her bare hands, she’s with Greg. 

Even the line Steven takes from her video in Lion 3: Straight to Video, about “every X being unique and beautiful” is shot in Greg’s presence. Without realising it, Steven is remembering this image of Rose.

And she cares about Steven. She engages in his interests. It’s not so far a stretch because some episodes back, Bismuth was willing to do the same thing. Rose was a fun person. There’s a running joke that she would have loved cheesy and corny jokes. She probably told a few in her day. 

She probably wasn’t always as poised as presented in her portrait. Greg remembers the Rose he changed, when she was starting to understand human beings in earnest and come to terms with how they could exist with gems on the same level. 

Rose at that point still didn’t want to talk about her past, and Greg never made her. So Greg and Rose made new memories and didn’t dwell on the old. And those memories were filled with fun and laughter and love.

The moment sobers when it is Rose not Steven, who gestures the latter to sit down and stare at the expanse of clouds.

And we should know that what we’re about to see means something has changed. The first hint is that Rose’s body language changes. She sits perfectly straight, even though she’s cross-sitting the way she was earlier. And we don’t see her legs anymore. Her hair neatens and her expression calms.

What’s more, her hands assume the position Garnet did in Here Comes A Thought in Mindful Education. And that emphasises the kind of role Rose plays in this moment. Steven felt Rose taught Garnet how to manage her feelings, because it was a motherly thing to do. In a very Steven Universe fashion, the music changes from the bright xylophone to a quiet piano music, which is the mark of another Crystal Gem, Pearl. 

And when we go back to the senior Crystal Gems and their image of Rose, it is exactly the way she’s presented.

Cloud Rose is a huge presence, with Steven a small child by her side. She speaks deliberately, every word is one of wisdom. She is magnanimous and comforting at the same time. 

She tells him, “But we’ve been together the entire time.” And it brings back the idea of how our parents are always with us, and a part of us, because one way or another they’ve left a mark on us.

At the same time though, the similarities of the scenes between this moment and the one at Rose’s Fountain in An Indirect Kiss, lead to the same end.

Rose is viewed as a godly icon, very distant from Steven. She’s not sitting beside him, playing with him, kneeling on the ground anymore. He looks up to her, and he can’t reach her.

In both times, he realises she’s not really there. That he talked to the statue of Rose in the fountain, confided his deepest insecurities about how he didn’t know how to feel about her when everyone else did, parallels the empty image on his phone.

And it segues into the next scene perfectly.

Because Steven doesn’t know how to feel about Rose. Now, he’s more certain than ever that he doesn’t even know who she is. The Rose we see at the end has a blank face, because Steven can’t project anything on it. He’s thinking of Pink Diamond’s shattering, Bismuth, and the Rebellion, and all the people hurt by them.

When he sees Rose, he can no longer see himself, which is why her eyes, one of the facial features most like Steven’s, (next to his nose) are nowhere to be seen.

And this Rose is distant, because there’s no mitigating narrative linking him to her. In the other scenes, the room remained the same, because these stories he was told of Rose and who she was firmly rooted the first two Roses as part of the real Rose’s identity.

This Rose is foreign, because nowhere in those narratives did Steven think it possible to for her to do the things he learned she did.

And in that moment he begins to doubt. 

Because he can no longer see the image of his mother, he doesn’t know where he himself stands. A huge part of his identity is being Rose’s son. What happens when the “Rose” part becomes fuzzy, blurry, and unintelligible?

What happens to the Steven?

Notice that this Rose is silent. She offers no response to the accusations Steven hurls at her, about all the people she hurt and her act of leaving them all behind. 

At this point, we see the part of Steven that understands Rose is gone. That he’s never going to get these answers and there won’t be an explanation coming from her.

There are some things he’ll never get to hear about, some memories he’ll never know, some experiences he’ll never share with her.

And it’s sad and disheartening and lonely. In losing his idea of Rose, Steven loses a part of his identity. Such that he felt it would be better if he denounced Rose, cutting off the part of himself he didn’t want to think about: That he was created just to fix her mistakes.

It’s then that we see Rose’s face for the first time since we’ve entered the paradigm of Rose-through-Steven’s eyes. Not Greg’s, not the Crystal Gem’s. Because these new things he’s learned about Rose are things the others would never have known without him. How else would they have heard the Diamond’s song of mourning? How would they have known Bismuth was there all along?

And the things Rose said in the tape were meant for Steven, in a space only Steven could find.

The Rose speaking to Steven at the end is the Rose who’s already spoken to Steven directly before, through the tape.

A lot of negative reaction has been given to this moment, because it feels as though the tape absolves Rose of everything she’s done. It doesn’t and I don’t feel that was the point.

The point of her saying that, was to reaffirm Steven’s belief in Steven. To show that it wasn’t about Rose anymore, that Steven’s birth wasn’t about Rose but about him.

And it’s striking that’s the only time we see her face again. Because immediately after, Steven hugs her, and her face is obscured. 

That’s Steven’s recognition that he’s never going to hear any other words straight from his mother for him. He understands and he realises that nonetheless, Rose is exerting a presence in his life. He really is always with her and never alone. 

The past few episodes and everything leading up to them were about Steven’s realising his mother was still an individual, one who could made mistakes and rash, selfish decisions. 

He was afraid that upon realising his mother could be a selfish individual, could do huge selfish things that affected thousands of lives, he feared the act of his birth, the most personal thing about him, was meant to serve her self-interests alone too. He needed a concrete and tangible answer, which was what prompted him to go to the room. 

At the end of the episode, he didn’t think that anymore. He knows he has a lot of work ahead in figuring out Rose’s place in his life, but the lingering doubt of the very foundation of his existence is gone.

And because of that, he finally feels comfortable letting her go.

Driving Miss Daisy

Star Wars’s Daisy Ridley and Adam Driver dish on the epic franchise and beyond in V Magazine.

“I had no sense of what I was getting into. No sense of what was really going to happen,” confesses Daisy Ridley of her first-ever role as Rey in 2015’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Currently, Ridley is on location in a remote forest a few hours outside of Montreal for Chaos Walking, a 2019 sci-fi release costarring Tom Holland. But it’s this December’s Star Wars: The Last Jedi, the follow-up to The Force Awakens, that is shining a blinding light-saber-tinged spotlight on Ridley. The Force Awakens was the first movie since 1997’s Titanic to sell more than 100 million tickets in the U.S. 

It isn’t typical for a young actress’s breakthrough film to have the biggest domestic opening weekend in history, raking in $238 million, but Ridley isn’t all that typical herself. As the face of the nearly $10 billion franchise, Ridley has ushered in a new era of Star Wars. Following Carrie Fisher’s untimely passing last year, Ridley’s character, a fiercely independent heroine, serves as a particularly strong female voice in a galaxy far, far away. However, a far- flung galaxy isn’t Ridley’s only on-screen locale this season. 

In November, Ridley appears opposite Johnny Depp and an all-star cast in Kenneth Branagh’s Murder on the Orient Express. The suspenseful tale follows 13 passengers, played by the likes of Penélope Cruz, Judi Dench, and Willem Dafoe, stranded on an opulent passenger train with a murderer on the loose. Aside from blockbuster films, Ridley also produced and narrated the documentary The Eagle Huntress, which follows a teenage girl in the mountains of Mongolia as she becomes the first female eagle huntress in the sport’s 2,000-year history. 

Ahead of The Last Jedi’s release, Ridley catches up with her Star Wars costar (and “bestie”), Adam Driver. 


Daisy Ridley Hey Adam, it’s been so long.

Adam Driver Hey Daisy, how are you? When is the last time that I saw you?

DR Well, I don’t know because you don’t come to all the fun things that I go to. [laughs] Last July? It’s been like a year!

AD Oh, yeah, I guess. I’m much taller now.

DR How has your life changed? [laughs]

AD Oh, just in little ways. So, where are you now?

DR I’m in Canada, two hours outside of Montreal in these creepy woods. We feel like we’re going to be killed at any moment in this cabin. We’re shooting a film, Chaos Walking, with Doug Liman, Tom Holland, and Demián Bichir. It’s fucking cool.

AD Did you guys have time to meet each other before? Or did you just kind of jump right in?

DR I had met Tom Holland twice very briefly—for, like, 30 seconds—and I had met Doug Liman once and we spoke a bit, but it was very much feet first, it was super quick.

AD So, is it hard for you to meet people and just kind of go? Or do you prefer it?

DR [laughs] I mean, as we discovered, Adam, we became besties last year, but we had met some years before. It really takes me a while to relax with people. I don’t think I’m very good at meeting people: I feel awfully uncomfortable. So, I find meeting people very stressful. But it gets easier, and I think I’m getting better at being okay with that, you know?

AD Yeah, you always seemed very open, but I feel the same as you. When I meet people, I don’t know how to small talk very well, so it’s always like two back-and-forths of like, “Hey, how are you? How’s the weather?” And then five seconds later, I’m like, “So, what’s your relationship like with your mother?” It always goes really deep really quickly.

DR [laughs] I think you’re really good at it.

AD Oh, thank you. So, this is about Star Wars: If Rey was a color…I’m kidding.

DR No, oh my God. [laughs]

AD What were your initial conversations with J.J. [Abrams] about your character? Did you know the character’s name was Rey?

Keep reading

Hawkeye (2012) #11

here’s a thing: whether shippy or platonic, I LOVE the concept of Max, Neil, and Nikki being the kind of friends who are very casually physical with each other. like it might take time for Max in particular to get used to (just based on the likelihood of him having intimacy/trust issues) but once he is they’re just kind of… all over each other all the time?

(idk about you guys but this is very common in my friend group. we are all constantly sitting on each other, squishing into spaces that are too small for that many people, cuddling up in huge piles, sharing beds/sleeping space, etc.)

I was just writing a scene for RAH where the three of them are piled up on Max’s bed and Nikki has her legs in Max’s lap and her head hanging off the mattress, and Neil is kinda leaning on them both, and I just… love the idea of these kids who all come from kind of shitty homes finding closeness and comfort and easy, healthy physical affection with each other

neo-pessimist  asked:

Hello! I hope you are doing well ^υ^ My brother just sent me a snap of the "What is your name?// I am Ciel Phantomhive" scene between Sebastian and Smile and something by struck to me. In the far left corner, on the altar, we see what seems to be a figure and lots of blood running down. It hit me, remember that one scene in the circus arc where Smile has an asthma attack?( 1/2)

Hi there!

(( Mmm, I’m not really sure if I’ve understood you correctly, so I’m sorry if my answer is beside the point!^^; ))

You mean the panel on the left, right? Yep, that’s definitely real Ciel’s dead body lying in a pool of his own blood on the altar. If you look closely, you can even see his left hand.

Actually, this panel was often brought up as one of the (many) 2CT hints! xD It was a significant hint in that it contradicted the popular theory that “the other Ciel we see sometimes is just Ciel’s past self, ghost, ‘innocence’, imaginary friend etc”. This is Sebastian’s Cinematic Record, so it only shows what Sebastian “saw”, and obviously there’s a body on the altar, but our Ciel is ‘alive’ and standing in front of Sebastian which means that OC couldn’t have been the boy who was stabbed!

I’m thinking Smile witnessed the death of his brother on that altar, Ciel dying there,

This is already canon ever since ch34! xD

This is OC’s traumatic flashback in ch34. We see through OC’s eyes how RC was dragged out of the cage, pushed down on the altar, how he was reaching his hand towards OC (this is so heartbreaking…), but then got stabbed by the cultist.

We also see in ch54

and in ch90

through OC’s eyes how RC was stabbed. And soon, we’ll probably get to see this scene for the fourth time Yana it’s enough.

Snoring Tony

Just a little idea that popped into my head yesterday. Hope you all enjoy it!

Word Count: 360

Pairing: Tony x Reader

“My God, how do you put up with that?” McGee asked, sitting back in his chair at his desk linking his fingers behind his head.

You and the team had been on a case three days straight, with very little sleep and an awful lot running about, talking to witnesses, going to crime scenes, back and forth to Abby as well as visiting and processing the victim’s apartment. You knew it was all part and parcel of your job but a little nap wouldn’t go a miss.

You stop what you’re doing, fingers ceasing their movements on the keyboard and rub your eyes. You blinked several times, bringing McGee into focus, “With what?”

His eyebrows shot up to his hairline and his arm stretched out to his left, “That!” He laughed gesturing to the agent beside him, your boyfriend, Very Special Anthony DiNozzo.

Your eyes follow Tim’s hand and a dopey smile comes to your face, you blame it on the lack of sleep of course, “He’s adorable.” You murmur as you placed your chin in her hand, watching Tony. His mouth was hanging open, slight drool trail down his chin, he was reclined back in his chair with his legs upon the table snoring…loudly. You could watch him sleep anytime, anywhere.

“He snores louder than my ex-wife,” Gibbs announced his arrival as he stalked into the bullpen, rounding his desk to check his emails.

DiNozzo shot up in his chair with a loud snort, feet planting on the floor, “Yes boss.” He replied automatically trying to make himself look busy.

You and Tim chuckle quietly, “Go back to sleep Tony.” McGee starts to say and just as Tony leant back in his chair Gibbs slammed his phone down, “Grab your gear,” he barked, “another dead body. Same MO.”

The three of you scramble for your packs and as you let Gibbs, who chucked the car keys to McGee, pass and you linger back, pecking Tony on the cheek once you were somewhat alone, “You’ll be abe to sleep soon, Tony.” You whisper and watch him smile, slinging his arm around you, you both walk to and enter the elevator.

8

1.02

Okay so I’m not done with this and legitimately when I have time this summer in the season break, will probably end up writing some Savitar fic and will probably make it coldflash if I do.

I had a wonderful idea!!!

Imagine for a moment Jack is ready to come out, the PR prepares a statement and everything, but the thing gets leaked.

Later on in the emergency press conference, Jack accidentally let’s slip that he’s seeing somebody from Samwell.

Bitty panics. They had a plan!

He’s not out to his parents and they were going to wait till he went back this summer, told them, explained he was dating Jack, gave them a crash course on what to expect from the press and then be in Providence with Jack when he read the statement.

Now, you know that saying that the best place to hide a book it’s in a library? Because the Samwell team does.

Ransom, Holster, Shitty and the frogs give different and ‘exclusive’ interviews with different news channels about how they are dating Jack Zimmermann.

The rest of the team, the ones we never see but are about 20 people, also give interviews or make tweets, Facebook posts and statements staying they are dating Jack Zimmermann.

And since Jack never said the person was still going to Samwell, alumni players catch up on what’s going on and start making statements of their own.

There are reporters around of course, and they are all annoyed and frustrated by this, but doing their best to ‘report’ the news.

Bitty gets caught up on the way to class and asked if he’s Jack Zimmermann’s boyfriend. Before he can freeze, Lardo elbows him and then he smiles his polite southern smile.

“Of course, I’m dating Jack.”

“How did it began?” Reporter asks skeptically because she already asked 3 other people and they all gave ridiculous stories.

“Well, the day he graduated I was feeling a bit emotional because he was leaving Samwell and we said our goodbyes, I came to the haus and was waiting for the shuttle to come pick me up to the airport, when Jack suddenly showed up after running across campus and kissed me! We didn’t talk much because then he had to leave to meet his parents for dinner but that’s how it started.”

Reporter, even more skeptical. “That sounds a lot like a movie scene. With you know, the running before you go to the airport part.”

“It was very special.”

“Uh-huh” says reporter convinced that the story it’s 100% bullshit and that Canadian-robot Jack Zimmermann would never do something like that.

And basically for a month you have all of Samwell claiming to be dating Jack, giving ridiculous stories and trying to be the most convincing choice.

Shitty posts pictures that frankly are hard to disputed of him kissing Jack’s cheek while naked.

Ransom posts photos of his own where they are golfing and have matching outfits.

Holster has a photo that kind of looks like he has his arms around Jack’s neck, which is kind of true only he was trying to strangle him after a very heated monopoly game.

Bitty posts one of them baking and throwing flour at each other.

There’s online polls about who is the real boyfriend and like imagine people being super invested in this, bachelor style.

Bitty it’s like in the 4th place because people think his stories are super cute but totally made up, like 'Jack bought me an oven for my birthday’ seriously dude, put some effort into this.

They do a hockey themed puck ceremony when they are ready to come out, it’s ridiculous and super dramatic and Jack looks pained to be involved in this but it’s awesome and the Internet loves it.

‘Civil War’ Audio Commentary By directors and screenwriters

It is for the record and all about RDJ thing or related.


MARKUS: It’s also Robert’s last shot, right? ‘Cause he had to shave the beard in order to shoot it.


JOE: I think we have to really, um, give a shout-out to Alfre Woodard here for doing a, you know, very small part in this movie, but a very integral part. It was so important that the audience feel the emotional impact of this and to have an actress of her calibre performing this for us was an incredible gift and a real favour.

ANTHONY: It was Robert’s idea, actually, to cast her. He brought her up for that role ‘cause I think he knew how important this scene would be for the character.

McFEELY: And even on set it was pretty clear. “Oh, wow! Wow!”

JOE: Exactly.

JOE: Robert is an incredibly big personality on-screen and you have to have an incredible actor or actress opposite him to hold the screen.

McFEELY: That’s right. He does not talk much in that scene.



JOE: We did a lot of work early on with Robert about the character and our big pitch to him, because he was not contracted to do this movie… We had to go to him and pitch him the film and get him creatively vested in the film, was that we were gonna take a very different approach with Tony Stark. That we were gonna make the character off-balance and emotionally vulnerable and, uh, insensitive and that, you know, he’s going to be in a real place of confusion. He’s dealing with emotions that he hasn’t had to deal with before. And that his moral centre and his narcissism are coming into conflict with each other. And he has to make a choice to submit his ego to the government.

McFEELY: And I think that’s being responsible to the movies that have come before. I mean, you know, you can’t blow off things like Ultron. If you do, then you are just spinning your wheels.

JOE: Right. You’re just making movies…

McFEELY: If he doesn’t learn from his mistakes, we will eventually get sick of him.



McFEELY: Uh, l kind of copped to the idea that Robert brought the pens in.

JOE: Yes. That was actually… So, our process with Robert… We could talk about the process with Robert a little bit. Robert is a very, um… I know the term is thrown around too much, but he’s an organic actor. He likes the mercurial part of the process, inspirational part of the process. And he really has to get under the skin of a scene in order to understand it on an emotional level for his interpretation of the character. So, what all of us would do, is every week before Robert would shoot. And I think he was on the movie for about eight weeks… We would all go over to his house on a Sunday, have a very lovely lunch, and then we would sit for a few hours and talk through the scene with him and Robert would do some improvisation in character. And, you know, the guys would write some of the lines down and then we’d talk through the structure of the scene and then, you know, without compromising the story in any way. Which, really… You know, Robert is incredibly additive, um, certainly in terms of character ‘cause he knows Tony Stark better than anybody on the planet. Um, and extremely inventive in his choices. And the pens were an idea that he brought to the scene as a way to represent what was going on between Cap and Tony in the scene. And it adds for a very lovely…

McFEELY: Oh, it’s great. They basically… It gives you a beginning and an end to that scene.



MARKUS: So, the nerves of Tom Holland being in a room with Robert Downey Jr. are 50% of the scene, and the rest of it is acting like you’re nervous Peter Parker being with, uh, Tony Stark. So, it’s just jazzed up by the fact that…

McFEELY: The dynamic is the same in life.

MARKUS: This kid is in the room with this huge actor.

ANTHONY: Also, this scene is so interesting, too, because it is… We used a version… You guys wrote a version of this scene to audition the actor. And we did screen tests with several actors with Robert Downey Jr. of this scene. A different version of it. But the thing is, we got to really work the hell out of this scene, both with the actors and you guys in terms of what the structure of the scene would be. And I think, this scene is one of my favorite in the film. But it’s interesting that it was a product of a lot of… We had several runs at the scene, so to speak, before we actually had to commit to it.

ANTHONY: Well, also, for a young actor, it’s like… One of the things I was always struck by in this scene is, to be able to act with Robert Downey Jr. when he’s giving… Like, Downey gave this scene his all. He knew how important this scene was. He knew how important Tom’s performance in this scene would be, as well as his own. And he gave this scene so much and he helped… You know, it’s like, you're never gonna be a better actor than when you’re acting across from Robert Downey Jr. It’s an amazing thing.


ANTHONY: He does something here, this line right here about the leg. So, Tom, you know, forgot the blocking of the scene. And of course, that’s Robert staying in character, telling him you’re supposed to move now, so I can sit on the bed.

McFEELY: Fabulous.

ANTHONY: But he’s Not only does he use it, but he uses it in a way that’s really entertaining and fun.

JOE: And becomes one of the better moments in this.

McFEELY: He really is great.

ANTHONY: With him totally in character. I mean, that’s such a dexterous and inventive move on an actor’s part.

JOE: I will say that…

ANTHONY: You don’t see that very often.

JOE: To pick up what you were talking about, Anth, this… There’s been many, many, many a moment where I went, “That’s why Robert Downey is Robert Downey. ” But no moment more so than when we blocked this scene with him and with Tom Holland. You know, we knew how important the scene was. And we showed up to start blocking the scene. And, you know, we knew we had about an hour and a half, two hours to do it because we were gonna take the time to get it right. It was a very small space, so there’s not a lot you can do in this scene. But if you notice, they move quite a bit in the scene. And after about 15 minutes of blocking, I saw Downey and I… And this was where I went, “This guy is an absolute genius. “He really understands movement and spatial relationship to camera.” He started moving around the space and Anth and I just kinda stepped back, and we watched as he encouraged Tom’s blocking throughout the whole sequence and… And, you know, making suggestions. “What would… If you went over to the bed at this point.” Or, “What if you… ” And the whole scene developed between he and Tom. Uh, and it is… We’ve seen the movie with a lot of audiences now, at the premieres. It’s always regarded as one of the favorite scenes in the film.

McFEELY: It is charming.

JOE: Uh, and it’s really… A lot of credit goes to Robert for helping Tom craft a star-making performance in the scene.



ANTHONY: This is the kind of scene where, as directors, you have to be very sensitive with actors, ‘cause what Downey was doing in this performance while he was watching the tape is so complicated. It’s sensitive and raw. You have to be very, uh, specific about your shots. You know, you can’t ask an actor to shred themselves emotionally like that.

McFEELY: So, literally, you planned on only doing this a few times?

ANTHONY: Exactly. ‘Cause you know, you can’t dial something up like that over and over.

JOE: And he wasn’t watching anything. We hadn’t shot this yet. I was literally standing off camera with the script just reading what he was saying.

McFEELY: Well, yes, and I remember you gilding the lily at times. You know…

JOE: Yes. I was trying to…

McFEELY: And now they’re pleading! 

JOE: Yes.

McFEELY: They’re screaming!

JOE: She’s begging for her life!

JOE: I did try to goose him emotionally, yes.

McFEELY: No. It worked great.

12.18 and editing (examples)

Ok, so I was going to do 12.10 because it had the most requests, but it wasn’t available on the CW site anymore, so I’m doing 12.18. It actually turned out really interesting. Thanks to everyone who put in your suggestions. hopefully I’ll be able to look at the others soon. 12.18 was requested by @a-little-nerdy-dude-with-wings.

As you can probably imagine, watching for all the editing takes a while and would take forever to write out all the scenes entirely(at least until there’s a transcript out), but I did it for the first 2 major scenes of the episode. Later, when I have more time, I’ll post what I think the editing in the full ep means, but have some examples of what I’ve been looking at, and looking for until then. Feel free to use the information however you wish.

Quick info on editing for tv shows:

Dramas have multiple types of cameras oftentimes, but only one is used during each setup, so they’re called “single camera shows”. A multi-camera show is like a lot of sitcoms, where things are filmed in order and more or less live like a play.

Shows like SPN are not filmed in order in the slightest and have lots of footage with different angles. They’ll often run the whole scene from each setup several times so there’s footage from different angles.

Split into roughly 7 days, each episode for most dramas generally undergoes the following editing passes. Some at the same time:

3 Days- Editor’s cut. This is the initial cut from the primary editor. They have to have a knowledge of the current arcs and where the arcs are going. They really have to know the show extremely well and be familiar with the character and story arcs. They have to understand how the show is edited because it can have a multitude of directors.

2 Days- Director’s cut. Directors may only direct for one episode and they tend to try and leave something of themselves in the work for their own needs so they can continue their careers. This is a difference between film and tv in that the director can try and keep scenes that specifically make them look good. The footage doesn’t always stay though, depending on whether it gels with the producer’s vision.

2 Days- Producer’s cut. This is where the showrunner comes in and makes sure that whatever is presented works with the entire arc, their vision, what’s planned for the future, etc. This is the last pair of story eyes essentially. This is where any arc long interference would be corrected, theoretically. This is where minor tweaking would occur to sell the showrunner’s vision.

2 Days- Network and S&P cut. This is like.. Censor stuff/legal stuff/timing stuff.. Let’s say there’s a song in there that can’t be used so they ask for a different one… stuff like that.

SPN has never really liked fancy cuts. Most cuts in the show are just straight cuts. The fanciest they usually go are J and L cuts. (audio from the previous shot carries over to the next, audio from the next shot starts in the previous). They’ll use other cuts in special circumstances like smash cuts (tense to calm, or calm to tense) or crossfades(montages use these a lot), but J, L, intercut(back and forth between scenes) and straight cuts are generally how the show goes. In general, if SPN can achieve whatever it wants to achieve without cutting, it won’t. Shot density plays into that a lot. But if it wants to achieve something that can’t be shown with only one shot, it will cut wherever is necessary to get what it wants. Usually in the form of reaction shots.

More, and the examples below.

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My fave canon souyo moment. There was no sunset in game, i know, but hey, it’s more romantic this way