lose colors

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Our Current (2/15/17) Women’s Champions

the First Japanese woman to become the NXT Women’s Champion

the First African American woman to become the Smackdown Women’s Champion

the First Latina woman to become the Raw Women’s Champion

FRIENDLY REMINDER THAT BECKENDORF IS NOT LIGHTSKINNED 

FRIENDLY REMINDER THAT HAZEL IS NOT LIGHTSKINNED

FRIENDLY REMINDER THAT NONWHITE PEOPLE DON’T NEED TO BE PALE TO BE AESTHETICALLY APPEALING

FRIENDLY REMINDER THAT USING ONLY LIGHTSKINNED PEOPLE IN ART AND EDITS DEFEATS THE PURPOSE OF THE DIVERSE CAST WE LOVE

🌿 Using Weed in Witchcraft 🌿

I’ve noticed there’s not a lot of posts on how to incorporate weed into witchcraft! I’ve had a few fellow stoner witchlings ask for a post as well and I feel comfortable making this post because I’m a certified botanist. I’m sorry if it’s a little unorganized, I got high to write it.🔥🌿 Please, only read this if you’re okay with the topic of drug use and remember to smoke responsibly, make sure you research specific strains! Also, I’m sorry this is long af.

Where Do I Even Begin?
I use cannabis as a way to induce a state of relaxation and meditation. For me, it helps me clear my head and focus my intention. Let’s start with the different strains of weed and which kind of witchcraft they support the best.

Indica tends to be sedative, and gives a body high. This type of marijuana will provide a very relaxing and strong body high that is helpful in treating general anxiety, body pain, and sleeping disorders. As a spoonie this is what I most often smoke to ease pain and nausea, just as a heads up to other people looking for relief. The most popular Indica strains currently include Kush, Northern Lights, and White Widow. My recommendation is Purple Kush or Northern Lights. This is great for self-love spells, protection, divination, healing, and stress-reducing spells or rituals.

Sativa -dominant marijuana strains tend to have a more grassy type odor to the buds providing an uplifting, energetic and “cerebral” high that is best suited for daytime smoking. A sativa high is one filled with creativity and energy as being high on sativa can spark new ideas and creations. This is great for glamour spells, love spells, hexes, curses, and other high energy spells. 

But honestly, just do whatever makes you feel good and makes you happy, your well-being and comfort should be the most important thing in your practice. Please smoke responsibly 

That’s Cool But What Else?
You can definitely mix certain herbs and flowers with your weed! Just pop a couple petals or buds in your grinder with your weed. Please, be careful that you don’t smoke something toxic and do your research. Some flowers are toxic to humans and a few are deadly. Below you’ll find a list of things you can smoke and their properties and why you cannot smoke because sometimes it’s hard to find information online. Note: Please, don’t smoke any of the below if you are nursing or pregnant. 

  • Yarrow is a mild stimulant and has anti-inflammatory properties, it’s great for soothing pain in the lungs and throat. It can cause allergic reactions.Courage, Love, Enlightenment 
  • Blue Lotus use as a sleep aid, as a natural anti-anxiety remedy, and as a stress reliever. Blue Lotus contains nuciferan (a natural anti-spasmodic) along with aporphine, which will give you feelings of calming euphoria. It is important you smoke only the petals. Lunar, Protection, Divination, Prosperity
  • Wormwood can also be used as a light anaesthetic. It is commonly used to give relief to menstrual cramps and muscle pains. It is also being used as a remedy for common cold, tapeworm, headaches, and nausea. It’s also used as an aphrodisiac, this is not for extended or frequent use. It can cause allergic reactions. Psychic Powers, Protection, Love, Calling Spirits
  • Lavender can be use as a sleep aid, as a natural anti-anxiety remedy, and a stress reliever. Sleep, Happiness, Peace, Cleansing, Protection, Love.
  • St. John’s Wart in very small portions. I’d rather you didn’t do it at all but it’s technically legal so I’m listing it St. John’s Wort may be a natural herb but it does have quite a few side effects. Before you start using it, consult your doctor first if you are taking medications that can negatively interact with St. John’s Wort. It can effect how well certain medications work including birth control, mood-stabilizers, and anti-depressants. On the other hand, St. John’s Wart is a mood-stablizier, so if you’re not on any medications and feel a little anxious smoking some could indeed help. The most common side effects are dizziness, nausea, digestive problems, tiredness, dry mouth, and sun sensitivity. Health, Protection, Strength, Love, Divination.
  • Rose petals, white sage leaves, rosemary, wormwood, mint leaves, marshmallow root, catnip, meadowsweet, and passionflower. I know there’s more I’m missing but these are the one’s I suggest!
  • Please don’t smoke(if it’s in bold it’s really bad): Yew, Sandal Wood, Mistletoe, Periwinkle, Dogbane, Orange/Lemon Peels, and Dragon’s Blood. Those are the major one’s people tend to ask about.

Fun Witchy Things To Do With Pot:

  • I like to blow smoke rings and use them as casting circles for cleansing energy. When they break apart and the smoke starts to blanket the room I know it’s absorbing all the negative energy from my home!
  • If you use a bubbler you can read the bottom like tea leaves! It’s a bit of hoot.
  • Incorporate the weed strains name into your magick! When I’m working with Freyja I often smoke Northern Lights because in Norse Mythology they represented the valkyries. And who doesn’t want to be bad ass? I smoke Purple Haze to bring in positive energy. Be creative! You know your practice the best. 💜
  • Incorporate the pipe into your practice. On Samhain, I smoke out of apples because it makes me feel extra witchy and closer to Hel. Also, you can carve sigils or names into an apple! You can use color correspondences or whatever floats your little balloon. 
  • Ashes!! Don’t throw away your ashes! Use them in binding spells, protection spells, or black salt. But if you’re a gardener plants love the ashes! Mix it in with plant food or just sprinkle some on top of them once a week! ( I personally swear by this, eggshells, coffee beans, and lavender salt.)
  • Cleanse your pipe, it’s the least you can do for all it does for you. I like to leave mine out under the full moon to cleanse and just smoke an apple instead with carved intentions to cleanse my home. (I use weed for everything, I’m sorry.)
  • Charge your water if you’re using bubbler, bong, vape, etc. Moon water is totally awesome in this situation and so is rose water! I personally love using rose water but please don’t use store bought rose water. It’s often simmered water and essential oils. You can make your own rose water by putting some petals (dried or fresh) into a saucepan and let it simmer, do not let it boil, when the petals lose their color it’s done. Press the remaining amount of rose from the petals with paper towels into the water!
  • When you inhale the smoke, visualize that you’re bringing in the good energy and all the properties of your bowl, let the smoke absorb all your negative energy and release it! I like to have an incense or candle going if I’m breathing out the bad. 😅
  • Charge your weed with crystals. Every time I get a new batch of weed I put a piece of rose quartz in with it and let it cleanse my weed of any negative energies it might have collected from previous owners.
  • Blow smoke out of your face like a dragon??? 

I hope this is helpful in some way! If I’m missing anything please let me know! 💖🌿💨  

A Collection Of Books By Neurologist Oliver Sacks

If you’re interested in neuroscience or psychology, I’d highly reccomend any book by Oliver Sacks! I get asked a lot about books to read so you can also check out this video I made with my top 7 and this masterpost which includes websites where you can learn more!

1. Migrane

For centuries, physicians have been fascinated by the many manifestations of migraine, and especially by the visual hallucinations or auras- similar in some ways to those induced by hallucinogenic drugs or deliria–which often precede a migraine. Dr. Sacks describes these hallucinatory constants, and what they reveal about the working of the brain. 

2. Awakenings

Awakenings is the remarkable account of a group of patients who contracted sleeping-sickness during the great epidemic just after World War I. Frozen in a decades-long sleep, these men and women were given up as hopeless until 1969, when Dr. Sacks gave them the then-new drug L-DOPA, which had an astonishing, explosive, “awakening” effect. Dr. Sacks recounts the moving case histories of these individuals, the stories of their lives, and the extraordinary transformations they underwent with treatment.

3. The Island of The Color Blind

Oliver Sacks has always been fascinated by islands, and this book is an account of his work with an isolated community of islanders born totally colorblind.  He listens to these achromatopic islanders describe their colorless world in rich terms of pattern and tone, luminance and shadow.

4. Uncle Tungsten

A book about Sacks’ childood;  his discovery of biology, his departure from his childhood love of chemistry and, at age 14, a new understanding that he would become a doctor.

5. An Anthropologist on Mars

This book talks about 7 seemingly paradoxical neurological conditions: including a surgeon consumed by the compulsive tics of Tourette’s Syndrome except when he is operating; an artist who loses all sense of color in a car accident, but finds a new sensibility and creative power in black and white; and an autistic professor who has great difficulty deciphering the simplest social exchange between humans, but has built a career out of her intuitive understanding of animal behavior. 

6.  Seeing Voices

 A journey into the world of deaf culture, and the neurological and social underpinnings of the remarkable visual language of the congenitally deaf. Sacks writes “The existence of a visual language, Sign, and the visual intelligence that goes with its acquisition, shows us that the brain is rich in potentials we would scarcely have guessed of, shows us the almost unlimited resource of the human organism when it is faced with the new and must adapt.”

Testing out a new brush and this picture that everyone really liked became the victim lol. Happy Valentine’s day everyone!

Crystal Safety, Revisited

There’s an awesome post going around by @prettycitywitch that discusses crystal care and toxicity. I noticed a few errors in it, just due to the source that was used, so I contacted her and got permission to rewrite it to ensure the most accurate information possible is spread around in the witchy community. I’ve gone through every crystal in her list and added a few others. 

Everything in this list has been confirmed by the Gemological Institute of America Laboratory (one of the foremost in gemological research), multiple published mineralogical sources, and/or at least two online mineralogical databases. Crystals of particular concern in each category have been bolded; the other listed crystals have a bit of wiggle room.

Crystals affected by sunlight or heat
Most crystals (including nearly all in this list) are safe to expose to sunlight temporarily - you can wear them in jewelry during the day, for example, but don’t leave them in your windowsill for weeks. In general, colorless crystals may be left in the sun indefinitely, while colored (especially pink) crystals should be stored in a place that doesn’t get direct sun all day. Heat, on the other hand, can easily affect many crystals, but usually only at high temperatures (steam or a jeweler’s torch), so I’ve only included the ones that could be damaged by relatively low temperatures.

  • Amber - may crack in heat
  • Amethyst - may fade over time; safe to expose to sun temporarily
  • Apophyllite - heat can cause flaking; sunlight is fine as long as the specimen is kept cool
  • Maxixe (dark blue beryl) - fades extremely quickly to pale brown in sunlight; color can only be restored through irradiation
  • Azurite - will fade over time with exposure to sunlight; store in a dark, cool environment
  • Celestine - fades in long exposure to sunlight
  • Chrysoprase - may fade in sunlight; restoration of color sometimes possible through prolonged storage in water
  • Fluorite - occasionally can fade in sunlight
  • Hackmanite - exhibits tenebrescence, a temporary change in color due to sun exposure; will return to original color if kept in a dark area
  • Hiddenite - unstable in sunlight and heat to a lesser degree than kunzite
  • Kunzite - will fade drastically in sunlight; indoor incandescent light can also slowly affect this stone
  • Larimar - fades over time when exposed to sunlight and heat
  • Morganite - deeper colors or more lilac hues can fade in sunlight
  • Opal - fading is minimal, but sunlight, heat, and changes in air pressure can cause internal fracturing called “crazing”
  • Pearl (& mother-of-pearl) - may lose color or turn dull in sunlight or heat
  • Sulfur - extremely heat-sensitive; crystals may fracture or burst if left in the sun or held in your hand
  • Topaz - irradiated stones may fade in direct sunlight
  • Tugtupite - exhibits tenebrescence, a temporary change in color due to sun exposure; will return to original color if kept in a dark area
  • Vanadinite - may darken and lose transparency in sunlight
  • Zircon - heat-treated stones may revert to original color over time in sunlight; avoid exposure to UV lights (tanning beds, nail salons, etc)

Water-soluble crystals
Though many crystals will eventually be worn away by water mostly due to tiny particles of other substances suspended in the water, there are very few that will dissolve in water in any significant way. Contrary to what some believe, most crystals with the suffix ‘-ite’ aren’t water-soluble; ‘-ite’ simply means ‘stone’ and is part of most mineralogical names. 

  • Anhydrite - not water-soluble, but instead will absorb water and convert to gypsum; store in a dry environment and do not submerge
  • Boji stone - not water-soluble, but may rust due to iron component
  • Calcite - somewhat soluble in slightly acidic water; neutral or slightly alkaline water is usually safe; negligible dissolution in air due to gaseous carbon dioxide
  • Celestine - very slightly soluble
  • Chalcanthite - easily soluble in water, but must be stored in a humid environment
  • Chalcopyrite - not soluble, but may rust due to iron content
  • Fluorite - very slightly soluble
  • Halite - easily dissolves in water; moisture from your skin or humidity in the air can eat away at crystals
  • Hematite - not water-soluble, but exposed rough areas may rust
  • Magnesite - slightly soluble; solubility increases with presence of salt
  • Magnetite - not water-soluble, but may rust due to iron content
  • Malachite - slightly soluble in water containing carbon dioxide
  • Marcasite - water may trigger decomposition into melanterite, which contains sulfuric acid
  • Mica (muscovite, fuchsite, lepidolite, etc) - plate or sheet-like specimens may absorb water into cleavage planes and begin to break apart; aggregated crystals are safe in water
  • Pyrite - exposure to water, including high-humidity environments, can trigger breakdown
  • Rhodochrosite - slightly soluble in water containing carbon dioxide
  • Sulfur - soluble in warm water; may form sulfuric acid over time if left in a wet or humid environment
  • Ulexite - dissolves in hot water; slightly soluble in cold water

Acid-soluble crystals
A large number of crystals will dissolve in acid. Many only dissolve in strong acids, such as hydrochloric acid - I won’t list those here because it generally won’t be a concern. There is very little information on mineral solubility in weak acids, such as vinegar, so this list is incomplete. But really, why are you soaking any of your crystals in acid?

  • Amber - “young amber” is soluble in a large number of chemicals
  • Aragonite - easily soluble, even in dilute acids; effervesces
  • Atacamite - readily soluble in acids
  • Azurite - may be slightly soluble
  • Calcite - easily soluble; effervesces
  • Lapis lazuli - composed of a number of minerals, including calcite, which may be acid-soluble; acetone and other substances may remove dye
  • Magnesite - slightly soluble in acids
  • Malachite - readily soluble in acids; color may also be affected
  • Pearl (& mother-of-pearl) - soluble in acids; surface will become dull and pitted
  • Rhodochrosite - slightly soluble in warm acids; effervesces
  • Smithsonite - effervesces and dissolves in acids

Crystals affected by salt
Salt is a dehydrator, so any hydrated crystal may be damaged by it. Salt has a hardness of 2 to 2.5 and may scratch any mineral softer than this. It is safe to put non-hydrated crystals of a hardness between 2.5 and 7 in salt, but very fine scratches may occur due to impurities; don’t put cabochons or faceted stones in this hardness range in salt.

  • Apophyllite - may dehydrate in salt, resulting in flaking; usually not an issue unless combined with heat
  • Cavansite - may dehydrate
  • Chalcanthite - dehydrates easily, forming potentially dangerous powder; store in a humid environment
  • Gypsum (including selenite) - hardness of 2; may be scratched by salt; may dehydrate to anhydrite
  • Opal - will dehydrate and develop internal fractures called “crazing”; store in a wet or humid environment
  • Pearl (& mother-of-pearl) - may become dull and pitted
  • Stilbite - may dehydrate

Potentially dangerous crystals

In general, crystals are pretty safe - handling them is usually okay. Many crystals do have somewhat dangerous elements, such as aluminum-bearing garnets, but they’re “locked” in the crystal structure in a way that prevents them from harming us unless the crystal is powdered or dissolved and inhaled/ingested. The occasional garnet or moonstone gem water won’t hurt you in the slightest.

Because there’s no way for this list to be ‘complete’ - I don’t know what unusual stones you might have - I advise you to never make gem waters with or otherwise ingest

  • powdery, very fine, or fibrous crystals;
  • crystals which you have not identified;
  • metal ores;
  • metals, with the exceptions of gold, platinum, tungsten, and titanium; and
  • stones composed of a variety of minerals.

Don’t use these crystals for gem water, elixir, massage oil, etc. Don’t put these crystals in your mouth or otherwise insert them into your body.

  • Adamite - contains arsenic
  • Amazonite - generally safe, but the color is usually caused by traces of lead; don’t use flaky or powdery specimens in gem waters
  • Atacamite - contains copper
  • Aurichalcite - contains copper and zinc
  • Azurite - contains copper
  • Boji stone - composition can vary, so some stones may have dangerous components
  • Brochantite - contains copper
  • Cerussite - ore of lead; wash hands after handling; do not inhale dust
  • Chalcanthite - contains copper; wash hands after handling; do not rub eyes after handling; do not inhale; do not ingest
  • Chalcopyrite - ore of copper
  • Chrysocolla - contains copper
  • Cinnabar - ore of mercury; always wash hands after handling; do not inhale dust; never ingest in any form; do not heat; massive (aggregate) cinnabar can contain elemental mercury which is very easily absorbed by the body
  • Conichalcite - contains copper and arsenic
  • Cuprite - contains copper; do not ingest
  • Dioptase - delicate, may break or crumble into powder; contains copper
  • Eilat stone - contains copper
  • Galena - ore of lead; wash hands after handling; flaky/crumbly specimens are common, be careful not to inhale dust
  • Malachite - contains copper
  • Marcasite - decomposes to melanterite, which contains sulfuric acid; do not ingest; wash hands after handling; do not inhale
  • Mohawkite - contains copper and arsenic; may contain other toxins
  • Psilomelane - contains barium
  • Pyrite - broken-down pyrite can contain sulfuric acid; do not ingest; if pyrite appears blackish or crumbly, wash hands after handling
  • Realgar - contains arsenic; wash hands after handling; never ingest
  • Serpentine (sp. chrysotile) - safe unless fibrous; do not inhale; asbestos
  • Stibnite - very soft; contains antimony
  • Sulfur - can form sulfuric acid when in contact with moisture
  • Turquoise - usually safe unless powdery; contains copper
  • Vanadinite - contains lead; may have traces of arsenic
  • Wulfenite - ore of lead and molybdenum; do not ingest or inhale

A few final safety reminders

⚠️ Never swallow any crystals, because some otherwise safe crystals can interact with your stomach acids and produce dangerous chemicals.

⚠️ Never crush, powder, or dissolve crystals with the intention of inhaling or ingesting them - fine powders and solutions make elements more accessible to the body.

⚠️ Wash your crystals in water and gentle soap before making any gem waters, elixirs, etc. with them. Even if the crystal itself is safe, it may have been in contact with other dangerous crystals or chemicals.

⚠️ Never make gem water, elixirs, etc. with crystals that are on/in matrix (the base rock the crystals grew from). You don’t know what the matrix is composed of, and it may contain dangerous minerals or elements.

⚠️ Never burn, hold in a candle flame, or intentionally heat your crystals. Intentional heating should only be performed by a jewelry or gemstone professional in a controlled environment.
The sole exception to this is anhydrite without matrix, which may be carefully raised to 200°C (~400°F), dry heat, to dehydrate it and change any gypsum components back to anhydrite. Be aware that this process can occasionally result in fractures, breakage, or internal damage to the stone.

Keep yourself and your crystals safe, everyone! There’s no way for this list to be complete, because there are thousands of minerals out there, so please feel free to contact me if you have questions about any particular stones!

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- “I will always come find you.”
- “You are the one who I always come back to.”

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Herbal candle DIY These are good for rituals, scent or the aesthetic of it. Perfect custom altar additions, made just the way you like it. What you will need: -candles or candle wax -herbs/flowers of your choice -a spoon -a heavy book -a clothing iron -parchment paper Optional; -essential oils -food colouring 1. The first thing you want to do is gather herbs and flowers to put in your candle, whether it be for a spell, or ritual or for the scent or aesthetic of it. 2. The herbs must be dry herbs, you can dry them yourself if you like. Pick the flowers of your choice (make sure to dry out any excess moisture) 3. To press/dry the flowers (or leaves), you must press them between two pieces of parchment paper in a heavy book for 15-20 minutes, and then to dry them, run a clothing iron over the paper, keep checking on the flowers to make sure they are not burning so that they do not lose color. Once they are stiff and dry, they’re ready to go. 4. You can use wax chips/blocks or you can melt up an old candle. (BONUS: match the color of the wax to your intent (or add food colouring)). 5. Optional: add essential oils, match the scent to your intent if you wish. 6. Then pour the wax into a glass or mould of your choice, holding the wick in place manually or with a clip until the wax is COMPLETELY DRY. 7. Once the wax is dry, remove it from the mould . 8. Hold an old metal spoon over a flame to heat it. Using this spoon press the flowers into the wax, pressing as deep or as shallow as you like and you can move wax over bits of herb/flower to create your desired effect. VIOLA! You have a goregeous looking and wonderful smelling candle, full of herbs with magickal attributes, which can be activated through lighting the wick. Happy witching ~ @indigo-amethyst

One half of my recent collaboration with @lucidiux: HicCsTRIDDD

She did the lineart and I did the coloring. I hope you enjoy it!

How to Make Rose Water

Hi everyone! Since the roses are in full bloom now, I’d thought I would make this simple tutorial on how to make rose water. Roses are great for many different kinds of magic, but since they’re either expensive or unavailable during certain times of the year, their water is great substitute, and can be used for many things on its own!

What you’ll need:

3 rose heads (the flower part, not the stem)

Approximately 6-8 cups of water

A big pot (with a lid)

Step 1:

Fill your pot with the water and strip all of your rose heads of petals. If you want your water to be more potent, throw in the petal-less head in, too.

Step 2:

Simmer (not boil) your water with the roses in it and the lid on. Keep a close eye on it; you’ll want to remove the pot from the heat when the rose petals lose their color. This can take 10-20 minutes depending on your stove. You don’t want to let the petals heat for too long, or they’ll disintegrate.

Step 3:

Strain your water thoroughly, making sure to press the petals of any excess water. After this, you can bottle your newly made rose water! It can keep indefinitely, so I recommend making big batches that’ll last you until the next rose harvest.