loeb library

anonymous asked:

Hello! You said to the other anon you learned Ancient Greek, could you please tell me where did you learned? The place I live there's no such course and I'm also interested in learning. Thanks! :)

I’m glad you’re interested in learning Ancient Greek! I was fortunate enough to be able to take introductory Ancient Greek classes at the university I attended. I found it a difficult but rewarding experience. Since I took Greek classes, I unfortunately don’t have any suggestions for specific self-teaching resources. We used the textbook Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, which teaches classical Attic Greek. I know some people who have used Hanson and Quinn’s Greek: An Intensive Course, which is more challenging, I think, but I haven’t used it myself. 

A website I find particularly helpful in reading ancient texts is the Perseus Digital Library (ask any Classics major–they probably love Perseus!). It has the public-domain Loeb Classical Library editions (originally published by Harvard with the Greek or Latin on one page and the English on the facing page). You can click on each word to see a linked definition and morphology. I believe there is also a digital Loeb site. 

I also love the University of Chicago’s Logeion app. You can search for the definitions of either Greek or Latin words, and it includes the entries from various dictionaries (very useful!). I particularly like the fact that you can type in Greek characters if you have the Greek keyboard on your phone turned on. Online dictionaries often don’t allow this.  

I hope this is somewhat helpful! Happy studying! 

im so glad for

  • the online loeb classical library
  • perseus
  • database of latin dictionaries
  • packhum
  • the internet ok computers just make all my research and all my work easier to do and sometimes im so glad i live in this era

ugh, I’ve been trying to read articles on my computer instead of printing them out, since that costs money and means I have a lot of excess paper sitting around that I won’t touch after the class has ended, but it means I have to haul my computer up to campus for every class, WHICH I HATE DOING! because my computer is large and heavy and somewhat unreliable and having it with me makes me incredibly nervous.  and I prefer reading non-fiction in hardcopy because I process it better.

except my professor keeps assigning books that we can only read online.

like, I appreciate that the Loeb Classical Library is available online (if you have a subscription), but it’s not available as downloadable rented ebooks, which means that the text is fucking tiny. (and this one is actually on me, since I could have checked out Boethius and Procopius from the library, except someone already checked out The Secret History so actually I couldn’t have, I did get The Wars of Justinian in hardcopy.  also, this is ironic because I own Procopius, I just didn’t bring it with me from Washington.)

basically I am trying to convince myself to go up to campus on a day when I don’t have class so I can print, since I haven’t set up the printer my housemate acquired for me.  (seriously, she is amazing, she also acquired all my furniture since she had a friend who was moving and selling his furniture.)  I need to get books out of the library anyway, so…I should go whenever my rice cooker is done because the idea of reading this entire 43-page article on my computer is a hard no, I can’t take it anymore.

And Victor sat in a chair by the kitchen range, the only warm place in the house. He followed the news of the war in The Times every day and took the Kentish Gazette on Thursdays. He read Ovid, particularly Tristia, his poems of exile. When he read, he ran his hand over his face so that the children couldn’t see what the poet did to him.

- Edmund de Waal

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The First Cut by Jacqueline Rush Lee 2015

Transformed Harvard Loeb Library Translation of Ovid’s “Metamorphoses.”
H7.75″ x W5.5″ x D6.5.″ Photo: Paul Kodama

One of two works commissioned by Robert Bolick, curator of Books on Books.

The Metamorphoses is Ovid’s epic poem about “bodies which have been transformed into shapes of different kinds.” With motifs of violence, punishment, reward, pathos, and lost speech dwelling within this classic tale, Ovid writes about human feelings in the face of the awful and the tender, the terrifying and beautiful, the violent and loving.

Jacqueline Rush Lee has worked experimentally with the book form for over seventeen years. You can check out her tumblr here

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The First Cut.  Jacqueline Rush Lee 2015

Transformed Harvard Loeb Library Translation of Ovid’s “Metamorphoses.”

H7.75″ x W5.5″ x D6.5.″  Photo: Paul Kodama

One of two works commissioned by Robert Bolick, curator of Books on Books.

The Metamorphoses is Ovid’s epic poem about “bodies which have been transformed into shapes of different kinds.” With motifs of violence, punishment, reward, pathos, and lost speech dwelling within this classic tale, Ovid writes about human feelings in the face of the awful and the tender, the terrifying and beautiful, the violent and loving.

*Robert Bolick writes about the evolution of the book and book arts on his blog BooksOnBooks

thanks to the loeb classical library my association with greek as green and latin as red is complete and unshakeable. i want to put my greek and latin notes from undergrad into one box to free up space but i cannot because one box is green and one box is red, and to put latin notes into a green box or vice versa would be nothing short of unholy