local nationals

Legally a house can be haunted and failure to disclose that the property is haunted can constitute fraudulent misrepresentation and is grounds for recession of contract. Meaning poltergeists are legally treated the same as termites or other pests.

This sounds like a cryptid post but this is actual U.S. case law

The issue came up in a case where a family bought a house and later discovered it was on a ghost tour. The buyer had no way of knowing the house was haunted since that’s no something buyer’s usually ask, but the previous owner knew and should have disclosed it. Since the owner had reported paranormal activity in both local and national publications describing at length how  haunted the house was court decided they couldn’t very well say there’s no such thing as ghosts now.

This resulted in legal precedent that recognizes the existence of haunted houses. Also the court’s opinion is probably the most entertaining legal opinion you will ever read.

This post does not constitute legal advice 

What really happened in Charlottesville.

Disclaimer:I don’t condone nor Support neo Nazis, because they fucked up and make other nationalists look bad. They are just as worse as Antifa, so fuck them both. If you are easily offended about this post, then keep scrolling, why waste time making huge unnecessary fuss about it!! .

This is what happened in Charlottesville, since media is incapable of reporting:

-The Alt Right organized a peaceful assembly in Charlottesville called Unite the Right

-The organizers lawfully obtained a permit to host this event

-Wes Bellamy, the Vice-Mayor of Charlottesville, illegally revoked the permit for this event. Wes Bellamy is a known Leftist and is affiliated with the Black Panther Party, a Black supremacist organization

-The ACLU successfully sued Charlottesville for violating the First Amendment, and a Federal judge ruled that the permit must be reinstated and the right to assemble honored

-Unite the Right was scheduled to take place at 12:00pm today. At 11:30am, a heavily militarized police force illegally shut down the event, physically assaulting peaceful protesters with batons and tear gas. Several people were illegally arrested

-While evacuating, many protesters were illegally assaulted by counter-protesters from Antifa and Black Lives Matter as the police stood by and did nothing. Antifa and BLM members were recorded throwing bricks at people, using pepper spray, and throwing molotov cocktails and tear gas

-A terrorist drove his car straight in to a crowd of people, killing at least one. The state of Virginia declared a state of emergency with the National Guard on standby, and Charlottesville became the #1 news story in the world

-The lying media intentionally portrayed this all in a way to make it look like the peaceful protesters were the perpetrators of the violence, rather than the victims, despite heavy video evidence to the contrary

-This was an enormous breech of everyone’s First Amendment rights, and a violent police-state suppression of free speech that is now being hidden by the lying media. A LOT of lawsuits are incoming, stay tuned!

A Survival Guide To Recycling in Germany

One of the most immediate culture shocks of traveling to Germany, especially if you grew up in the United States, is Germany’s seeming obsession with recycling. Whereas in the U.S. you are lucky if you can locate a recycling bin in public areas like parks or street corners, you’ll have the opposite problem in Germany, where you’ll find a sometimes confusing plethora of multi-colored bins. If you have been in this situation, looking around desperately to strangers or waiting to see what items other drop in each bin, we feel you. YOU are not alone. Even Germans sometimes question which bin is appropriate for which items.

Due to this common culture shock and the often harsh punishment one receives for a wrong move, we thought we’d give you the lowdown on German recycling.

Step 1: Prevent creating waste in the first place

Germany has created and continues to develop a culture of minimal waste. This is true for projects big and small: here are a few examples of major reducers of waste.

Bag fee: Germany combats the environmental threat of excessive plastic bag-use by adding a small fee onto bags at stores. Even though it’s small, the fee has further motivated people to bring their own reusable bags or carts to stores. Some stores now don’t offer plastic bags at all–opting instead to offer paper bags for those who need them.

Lack of excess packaging: Say tschüss to those individually wrapped fruit packages or items wrapped individually in plastic, then wrapped collectively in plastic.

Quality over quantity: According to a 2016 report by Germany Trade and Invest, Germans are well researched and particular consumers. They are much more risk averse and likely to return items that don’t meet their expectations. This makes things like quality labels or reviews really important and generally lends towards a population that has fewer, but higher quality possessions that don’t need constant replacement.

Step 2: Pfand

Imagine if, for every bottle–plastic or glass, you bought, you had to pay extra for it. The deal in Germany is that you pay more initially but then receive that surcharge back when you give the bottles back for recycling. So, just like when you weekly take the garbage out in the States, in Germany it is a regular habit to return your bin of recycling to super markets where you will find a machine like this:

This machine scans the bar code of your items, and prints a receipt for you to redeem at the register. Basically, if you don’t recycle your eligible items for Pfand, you are losing money.

As a tourist, you have potentially experienced Pfand in a different way. At Christmas markets, stands will charge you extra for the mug that hot drinks are served in. You can choose to keep the mug as a memento, or to return it for Pfand.

You may have also been asked for your empty bottle in public by someone collecting them to return. This is potentially convenient for you, earns them a little money by returning them AND it is good for the earth. Triple whammy! There are even entire non-profits that fund themselves by collecting Pfand at events or concerts.

Step 3: Choose your bin

This part sounds really uncomplicated from an American perspective. Trash or recycling…right?

After giving back bottles for Pfand, Germans sort trash typically by paper, plastic, bio/organic, glass, and other. Though details are dependent on town or region, a general breakdown goes like this:

Paper= blue bins. This bin is for cardboard, newspapers, magazines, waste paper, paper bags, etc, etc.

Plastic = Yellow bins. This is for plastic such as body wash, shampoo, sunscreen, laundry detergent, and juice bottles

Glass= Glass is sorted by color. There are different slots for depositing green, brown and clear glass. In this bin you should be putting any kind of jars (mustard, jam, yogurt, etc), oil bottles, wine bottles or the like.

Bio (organic) = green bins. This is for food waste like egg shells, banana peel, or scraps of food you didn’t eat.

Other = black bins. You choose your size and you’re charged accordingly. They send you a sticker each year to show that you’ve paid for it. Residual waste is garbage that neither includes pollutants nor reusable components. For example ash, dust bag, cigarette ends, rubber, toiletries, and diapers are thrown into the black bin.

Step 4: Enjoy a cleaner earth!

Though the effect of one person caring about the environment is small, the collective effort of a nation makes a dent. Germany leads the European nations in recycling, with around 70 percent of the waste the country generates successfully recovered and reused each year.

Recycling is only one part of Germany’s environmental efforts. Find more about national and local environmental initiatives here: http://www.germany.info/Vertretung/usa/en/07-Econ-Energy-Innovation/01-Energy-Climate-Env/Energy-Climate-Env.html

So I never post on Tumblr anymore but I felt like this needed to be put here.

I’m really bad at infographics, but someone asked a question in a group I’m in that merited this one being created.

We always talk a lot about why certain organisations are bad and others are good in the autistic community, but what we don’t usually do is establish where most of those good organisations are and what the GREAT ones are doing on top of that.

Here’s a handy guide we can use when examining local and national organisations! It is in no way comprehensive, of course.

(And yes, it does have a copyright with my real name on it because I really don’t want this being shared without proper credit.)

[Image description: Infographic with title ‘A Guide for Identifying Good Autism Organizations (and how they can improve!)’.

© 2017 Samantha Perry

There is a table with two columns labelled ‘Baseline’ and 'Better’. The text from left to right in each row is transcribed below.

Does the organization have multiple autistic people in their leadership?

Is the organization founded by or run entirely by autistic people?

Does the organization use proper language (identity-first, no functioning labels)?

Does the organization actively renounce and denounce person-first language and functioning labels?

Does the organization avoid imagery such as puzzle pieces or ‘light it up blue’?

Does the organization use neurodiversity imagery such as the rainbow infinity symbol?

Does the organization support legislation that benefits autistic people and reject legislation that harms them?

Does the organization actively campaign for/ against legislation that impacts the autistic community, and encourage civic participation (calling lawmakers, protesting, etc.)?

Does the organization focus on supporting autistic people through self-advocacy?

Does the organization denounce ‘treatments’ and ‘cures’ for autistic people?

Does the organization fundraise only to support its daily operation and not for ‘research’ or ‘treatments’?

Does the organization fundraise to directly benefit autistic people and their families in the local community?

Does the organization validate self-diagnosed autistic people and communicate reasons why many autistic people may be self-diagnosed?

Does the organization actively include self-diagnosed people and work to create solutions within the medical community that reduce barriers to diagnosis?

Does the organization acknowledge autistic adults exist?

Does the organization involve, support, and validate autistic people of all ages?

Is the organization focused on helping autistic people rather than focusing on families and caregivers?

Is the organization focused on pioneering coping strategies and self-advocacy for autistic people, regardless of age or ability?]

3

Today is the 25th anniversary of the beginning of the standoff at Ruby Ridge.

Randy Weaver, a former US Army combat engineer and factory worker moved his family to northern Idaho in the 1980s. Randy like many of us, wished to take his family off the grid to live a more natural life and to be far, far away from the rest of the country when it would inevitably collapse. They were a deeply religious and tight-knit group and his children remember their time at their mountain cabin as one of the happiest in their lives.

However, he and his wife, Vicki frequently traveled to the local Aryan Nations compound a few miles from their home for socializing and working with various residents there for mutual support and help. He attracted the attention of ATF agents, who figuring he could be a weak link and a possible informant for the government, entrapped him in an illegal arms purchase, asking him several times to sell their undercover agent some sawed-off shotguns. They figured if they could arrest him on this, they could pressure him to spy on his friends and neighbors in exchange for dropping the charges.

However, Randy refused to appear in court for these obvious fraud charges and would not come off his mountain cabin. His home was placed under heavy electronic surveillance, and eventually a team of US Marshals was sent in to arrest him. The team of four was given incredibly loose ‘shoot on sight’ Rules of Engagement that would not be seen till the war on terror post 9/11. The family dog heard/smelt their presence and took off in the woods to find them. Randy, his 14 year old son Samuel and a family friend, Kevin Harris took off after the dog believing it had found a deer.

The dog eventually came too close to the team of agents and they shot it, Samuel, being a boy and the dog one of his few companions, yelled ‘You shot my dog you son of a bitch!’ and fired three shots near the agents before turning to run and retreat. They shot him in the back and killed him. A firefight happened in which one federal marshal was killed by Kevin Harris, who was also wounded. Randy and Kevin fled back to the cabin and later returned to get the body of 14 year old Samuel.

The Siege would last 10 days, the mountain covered with snipers given a free-fire order for any adult seen carrying a weapon. It culminated when Randy and Kevin went to the garage where they had placed the Samuel Weaver to clean his body and prepare it for burial, a sniper opened fire shooting Randy in the arm, and as they fled back to the house, fired a second shoot at Kevin Harris through the front window, shooting his wife Vicki Weaver in the face as she held their 10-month old daughter and killing her.

With his wife and son dead, he and his friend wounded and with children still in the house, Randy surrendered and the siege came to an end. He was brought to trial for the charges against him, and found not guilty on all accounts.

Never forget, never forgive. Pigs deserve everything they get.

The Goiânia accident

The Goiânia accident was a radioactive contamination accident that occurred on September 13, 1987, at Goiânia, in the Brazilian state of Goiás, after an old radiotherapy source was stolen from an abandoned hospital site in the city. It was subsequently handled by many people, resulting in four deaths. About 112,000 people were examined for radioactive contamination and 249 were found to have significant levels of radioactive material in or on their bodies.

In the cleanup operation, topsoil had to be removed from several sites, and several houses were demolished. All the objects from within those houses were removed and examined. Time magazine has identified the accident as one of the world’s “worst nuclear disasters” and the International Atomic Energy Agency called it “one of the world’s worst radiological incidents”.

What follows in a incredible series of events motivated purely out of ignorance, childish wonder and greed, and the dire consequences this brought to the people involved and the city as a whole:

The accident began when two thieves, Roberto dos Santos Alves and Wagner Mota Pereira, broke into the abandoned and partially demolished Instituto Goiano de Radioterapia (IGR), where they came across a caesium-137-based teletherapy unit.

 They partially disassembled the unit, and placed the source assembly – which they thought might have some scrap value – in a wheelbarrow, taking it to Alves’s home, and once there, they began dismantling the equipment. That same evening, they both began to vomit. Nevertheless, they continued in their efforts. The following day, Pereira began to experience diarrhea and dizziness and his left hand began to swell. He soon developed a burn on this hand in the same size and shape as the aperture – he eventually had partial amputation of several fingers. 

On September 15, Pereira visited a local clinic where his symptoms were diagnosed as the result of something he had eaten, and he was told to return home and rest. Alves, however, continued with his efforts to dismantle the equipment. In the course of this effort, he eventually freed the caesium capsule from its protective rotating head. His prolonged exposure to the radioactive material led to his right forearm becoming ulcerated, requiring amputation.

On September 16, Alves succeeded in puncturing the capsule’s aperture window with a screwdriver, allowing him to see a deep blue light coming from the tiny opening he had created. He inserted the screwdriver and successfully scooped out some of the glowing substance. Thinking it was perhaps a type of gunpowder, he tried to light it, but the powder would not ignite.

On September 18, Alves sold the items to a nearby scrapyard. That night, Devair Alves Ferreira, the owner of the scrapyard, noticed the blue glow from the punctured capsule. Thinking the capsule’s contents were valuable or even supernatural, he immediately brought it into his house. Over the next three days, he invited friends and family to view the strange glowing substance.

On September 21 at the scrapyard, one of Ferreira’s friends succeeded in freeing several rice-sized grains of the glowing material from the capsule using a screwdriver; Alves Ferreira began to share some of them with various friends and family members. That same day, his wife, 37-year-old Gabriela Maria Ferreira, began to fall ill. On September 25, 1987, Devair Alves Ferreira sold the scrap metal to a second scrapyard.

The day before the sale to the second scrapyard, on September 24, Ivo, Devair’s brother, successfully scraped some additional dust out of the source and took it to his house a short distance away. There he spread some of it on the cement floor. His six-year-old daughter, Leide das Neves Ferreira, later ate a sandwich while sitting on this floor. She was also fascinated by the blue glow of the powder, applying it to her body and showing it off to her mother. Dust from the powder fell on the sandwich she was consuming; she eventually absorbed 1.0 GBq, total dose 6.0 Gy, more than a fatal dose even with treatment.

Gabriela Maria Ferreira had been the first to notice that many people around her had become severely ill at the same time.

On September 28, 1987 — 15 days after the item was found — she reclaimed the materials from the rival scrapyard and transported them to a hospital. Because the remains of the source were kept in a plastic bag, the level of contamination at the hospital was low.

In the morning of September 29, 1987 a visiting medical physicist used a scintillation counter to confirm the presence of radioactivity and persuaded the authorities to take immediate action. The city, state, and national governments were all aware of the incident by the end of the day.

News of the radiation incident was broadcast on local, national, and international media. Within days, nearly 130,000 people swarmed local hospitals concerned that they might have been exposed. Of those, 250 were indeed found to be contaminated— some with radioactive residue still on their skin— through the use of Geiger counters. Eventually, 20 people showed signs of radiation sickness and required treatment.

Ages in years are given, with dosages listed in grays (Gy).

Fatalities:

  • Leide das Neves Ferreira, age 6 (6.0 Gy), was the daughter of Ivo Ferreira. When an international team arrived to treat her, she was discovered confined to an isolated room in the hospital because the hospital staff were afraid to go near her. She gradually experienced swelling in the upper body, hair loss, kidney and lung damage, and internal bleeding. She died on October 23, 1987, of “septicemia and generalized infection” at the Marcilio Dias Navy Hospital, in Rio de Janeiro. She was buried in a common cemetery in Goiânia, in a special fiberglass coffin lined with lead to prevent the spread of radiation. Despite these measures, news of her impending burial caused a riot of more than 2,000 people in the cemetery on the day of her burial, all fearing that her corpse would poison the surrounding land. Rioters tried to prevent her burial by using stones and bricks to block the cemetery roadway. She was buried despite this interference.
  • Gabriela Maria Ferreira, aged 37 (5.7 Gy), wife of junkyard owner Devair Ferreira, became sick about three days after coming into contact with the substance. Her condition worsened, and she developed internal bleeding, especially in the limbs, eyes, and digestive tract, and suffered from hair loss. She died October 23, 1987, about a month after exposure.
  • Israel Baptista dos Santos, aged 22 (4.5 Gy), was an employee of Devair Ferreira who worked on the radioactive source primarily to extract the lead. He developed serious respiratory and lymphatic complications, was eventually admitted to hospital, and died six days later on October 27, 1987.
  • Admilson Alves de Souza, aged 18 (5.3 Gy), was also an employee of Devair Ferreira who worked on the radioactive source. He developed lung damage, internal bleeding, and heart damage, and died October 18, 1987.


Devair Ferreira himself survived despite receiving 7 Gy of radiation. He died in 1994 of cirrhosis aggravated by depression and binge drinking.

Source 

anonymous asked:

my gf and I are makin a list of date ideas for the summer do u have any suggestions?? 💓

this is adorable and i would love to see your completed list!

my first suggestion: make a summer scrapbook to document all your adventures! have a page for each bucket list item with photos, funny things that happened, ticket stubs, etc.  

  • try (and fail) several pinterest DIY crafts
  • bring a blanket and attend to a local outdoor concert
  • start a book club between yourselves (i.e. read independently, or out loud to each other, with discussion questions)
  • hide and seek in ikea
  • start a mini herb garden or terrarium
  • beach bonfire with volleyball competition
  • host a dinner party
  • twister with paint (wear white shirts for keepsake)
  • hangout with animals at local shelter
  • make homemade ice cream (i know the salt+shaking method) or popsicles! get creative
  • couples massages
  • build/paint a bird house
  • stay up all night and attend a dawn yoga class
  • kayaking/canoeing/paddleboarding
  • spin art?
  • complete a coloring book together
  • stargaze - download an app or find an online guide
  • draw with sidewalk chalk
  • drive in movie theater!
  • make smores!
  • fly kites
  • hike and picnic at a local national park
  • trip to the beach or lake! bonus: skinny dipping?
  • fruit/berry picking!
  • if you have young siblings/family members: help set up a lemonade stand
  • win each other something at a fair or carnival
  • kiss on top of a ferris wheel
  • scavenger hunt in mall/zoo (could potentially be a group date idea, with couples as teams)
  • water gun or water balloon fight
  • sleep outdoors (real camping, backyard camping, rv camping, trampoline camping)
  • body paint each other
  • buy local produce at farmers market, then bake/cook together
  • tie dye!
Scrooge’s Grief for Della Duck (An Essay):

A.K.A. Scrooge McDuck grieves and misses his niece Della, but has tried to bury that pain for the past ten years. 

DuckTales handled Scrooge’s grief for Della wonderfully for me.

His grief isn’t apparent like Donald’s, or the consequences of her disappearance aren’t obviously shown as it is with Donald. His overprotectiveness comes from losing his sister.

Scrooge’s a man constantly on guard with his feelings. It’s like pulling  teeth out when it concerns him opening emotionally. He doesn’t want to appear vulnerable, and this is a feature from the comics. Pride and fear keeps his emotions close and under his heart. His hidden grief for Della, or rather her absence, and the subsequent rift it caused in his family, is in-character.

But this could be guilt as well. I have the opinion he may believe he’s responsible for TSPoS incident despite what he tells Donald.

This essay is currently over 2,000 words long, so I understand if you’re not interested in reading. These are my personal observations after rewatching the pilot movie on Youtube (it’s DisneyXD’s official channel), and from my personal readings of Don Rosa and Carl Barks’ comics, which have been a while. I plan to reread Carl Barks as soon as I can as well as catch up with the European comics.

Disney isn’t holding any punches for this show. It was a 23 hour marathon for the pilot movie. Thanks, Disney.

Keep reading

huffingtonpost.com
Doctors want to learn about trans healthcare but lack the training, study shows
Transgender patients, meanwhile, have serious complaints with the care they receive.

A groundbreaking survey was released last week. Developed by the Mayo Clinic and Endocrine Society, it’s the first-ever report measuring American doctors’ “confidence levels and willingness to treat transgender patients.”

It’s a well-known fact that transgender people face huge disparities in healthcare access, from being mistreated or misgendered to not having access to any health services at all. Not surprisingly, the survey of more than 400 clinicians and program directors found that most hormone doctors – 81% – had never received any kind of training on treating trans patients. 

Among program directors, 72 percent said they provide some kind of education on transgender health topics, and 94 percent said this training is important. However, the program directors said they struggled to educate their fellows on these issues because they don’t have enough experienced faculty to teach the subject. […]

Of the minority of doctors who said they did receive training, only 4 percent said they got it during medical school, while only 7 percent said they were trained during their residency. The majority of teachers who received specialization got it during their endocrinology fellowship (58 percent), while 53 percent learned more at local, national or international meetings.

Obviously, a lack of training is no excuse for treating a transgender patient with disrespect (or worse). As more and more trans people come out and seek medically necessary, sometimes life-saving healthcare, it is a doctor’s responsibility to know what steps to take to help, and to take those steps with compassion. It’s time for med schools, residency programs, and doctors who don’t think before they speak to get with the picture. 

  • Supreme Court of Canada: "Rules that obtaining consent is part of the consultation spectrum the Crown faces when dealing with First Nations on issues that impact rights, title and territory."
  • Justin Trudeau: (2015): "While governments had the right to grant permits, only local communities — including First Nations — are able to “grant permission.”.
  • Justin Trudeau: (early 2016): Adopts the UN Declaration of Rights of Indigenous People (which states the right of Aboriginal groups to “free, prior and informed consent” on economic projects in their territories.
  • Justin Trudeau: (late 2016): “No [First Nations], they don’t have a veto (on industrial projects in their territories).”
  • Justin Trudeau: \_(ツ)_/¯
calling gentile allies

I’ve seen multiple posts on my dash just today about the JCC bomb threats and how they’re affecting the Jewish community, and I thought of an idea that gentile allies can help to alleviate some of the heightened anxiety and isolation that a lot of people are feeling right now. Raising awareness is great, but you know what’s also great? Getting to know your neighbors.

So here’s an idea: if you aren’t Jewish, look up whether there is a JCC or synagogue near you. Then keep an eye out for it in local and national news. If you see that it has received threats recently, take a few minutes out of your day and fill out a postcard or a card, and send it to the main office.

I want to emphasize that it’s best if you focus on local institutions rather than ones that are in another state, because it makes it much more personal. The anonymity of the recent threats is one of the reasons they cause so much fear; no one knows if it’s from someone across the street or across the country. Know that there’s someone nearby who is on your side can help balance out that anxiety. I also think cards are better than, say, phone calls, because it strikes me as potentially nerve-wracking if synagogues and JCCs end up with a rash of unexpected calls after getting a phoned-in bomb threat. And cards are very tangible; you can keep them in the office, put them on a bulletin board, point to them when people are having doubts about whether their community cares.

As for what to include in your message, you can really say anything you want in support and solidarity, but here are some things that might be especially nice for them to hear:

  • “Shabbat Shalom!” (if you think the letter will arrive on a Thursday or Friday; this is the Hebrew for “a peaceful Sabbath,” the traditional greeting in many communities)
  • “Happy Purim” or “Chag sameach!” (Purim is a holiday, happening Saturday March 11 and Sunday March 12 this year–in general, look up a Hebrew calendar and see if there’s a holiday around the time you’re sending the letter. Tisha B’Av and Yom Kippur are “the ones you can’t say Happy [holiday] on.”)
  • some communities are holding rallies after receiving threats–I know there was one in Springfield, MA–so if your community did, and you attended, definitely mention that!
  • “I am a member of [faith organization], and I think it is important for us to stand with you in these times. My organization has participated/hopes to participate in multifaith activities with the Jewish community.”
  • “I have a friend who went to school at her JCC and she always spoke about how much it meant to her, so I want to show my support.”/“My child has a classmate who attends your programs, and they were very concerned about making sure their friend felt safe.”
  • “I read an article your president wrote in the paper, or I heard about a community-wide event that you lead recently. It sounded great and in the future I hope to engage more with my Jewish friends and neighbors.”
  • ***nothing proselytize-y and nothing political beyond the immediate issue. there’s no need to bring Jesus or Israel into this conversation.***

Obviously there’s more to do beyond this. Educate yourself about antisemitism. Combat it in YOUR OWN SPACES, not just when it comes from your enemies. Show up to events organized by Jewish activists. Show up to multifaith events even if they’re not activist spaces–if your local synagogue is pairing up with a church or a mosque/masjid to run a toy drive, watch a movie, eat pancakes, whatever, grab a friend, find someone new, and introduce yourself.

But still, these things can be difficult. They can require spoons, time, transportation, etc. Writing a postcard only requires a writing surface, a writing utensil, a stamp, and two minutes of your time,  and it, too, helps build your community. Even if you don’t have a local Jewish org to support, please reblog and share the ahavah.