live somewhere else

Yesterday was v hard, it feels like my parents are making no efforts to try n accept who i am, n I can’t talk to them abt it (especially my dad) bc they just argue w me. Kind of likr a 5 year old ahhh, n I really wish i was living somewhere else, but im not 18 yet. So im gonna try to be as strong as i can. I am NOT a girl i will NEVER be a girl, some ppl need to grow up and accept that

46 Of The Most Beautiful Sentences In YA Literature

1. “You could rattle the stars. You could do anything, if you only dared. And deep down, you know it too, and that’s what scares you the most.”
—Sarah J. Maas, Throne of Glass

2. “Because sometimes chance and circumstance can seem like the most appalling injustice, but we just have to adapt. That’s all we can do.”
—Gavin Extence, The Universe Versus Alex Woods

3. “I can’t seem to be a pessimist long enough to overlook the possibility of things being overwhelmingly good.”
—John Corey Whaley, Where Things Come Back

4. “Books are my friends, my companions. They make me laugh and cry and find meaning in life.”
―Christopher Paolini, Eragon

5. “Because Margo knows the secret of leaving, the secret I have only just now learned; leaving feels good and pure only when you leave something important, something that mattered to you. Pulling life out by the roots. But you can’t do that until your life has grown roots.”
—John Green, Paper Towns

6. “Do not pity the dead, Harry. Pity the living, and, above all those who live without love.”
―J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

7. “I’m done with those; regrets are an excuse for people who have failed.”
—Ned Vizzini, It’s Kind of a Funny Story

8. “Becoming fearless isn’t the point. That’s impossible. It’s learning how to control your fear, and how to be free from it.”
—Veronica Roth, Divergent

9. “The moon is a loyal companion. It never leaves. It’s always there, watching, steadfast, knowing us in our light and dark moments, changing forever just as we do. Every day it’s a different version of itself. Sometimes weak and wan, sometimes strong and full of light. The moon understands what it means to be human. Uncertain. Alone. Cratered by imperfections.”
—Tahereh Mafi, Shatter Me

10. “Eleanor was right. She never looked nice. She looked like art, and art wasn’t supposed to look nice; it was supposed to make you feel something.”
—Rainbow Rowell, Eleanor & Park

11. “Don’t be afraid of death; be afraid of an unlived life. You don’t have to live forever, you just have to live.”
—Natalie Babbit, Tuck Everlasting

12. “Just because we’ve been … dealt a certain hand … it doesn’t mean that we can’t choose to rise above — to conquer the boundaries of a destiny that none of us wanted.”
—Stephenie Meyer, Twilight

13. “Some walks you have to take alone.”
—Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

14. “That’s the thing about pain. It demands to be felt.”
—John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

15. “We believe in the wrong things. That’s what frustrates me the most. Not the lack of belief, but the belief in the wrong things. You want meaning? Well, the meanings are out there. We’re just so damn good at reading them wrong.”
—Rachel Cohn, Dash & Lily’s Book of Dares

16. “Why would you be given wings if you weren’t meant to fly?”
—Leslye Walton, The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender

17. “Live! Live the wonderful life that is in you! Let nothing be lost upon you. Be always searching for new sensations. Be afraid of nothing.”
—Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

18. “It’s just that…I just think that some things are meant to be broken. Imperfect. Chaotic. It’s the universe’s way of providing contrast, you know? There have to be a few holes in the road. It’s how life is.”
—Sarah Dessen, The Truth About Forever

19. “The universe is bigger than anything that can fit into your mind.”
—Ava Dellaira, Love Letters to the Dead

20. “I try to think about how it all works. At school dances, I sit in the background, and I tap my toe, and I wonder how many couples will dance to ‘their song.’ In the hallways, I see the girls wearing the guys’ jackets, and I think about the idea of property. And I wonder if anyone is really happy. I hope they are. I really hope they are.”
—Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

21. “Things were rough all over but it was better that way. That way, you could tell the other guy was human too.”
—S.E. Hinton, The Outsiders

22. “What if evil doesn’t really exist? What if evil is something dreamed up by man, and there is nothing to struggle against except our own limitations? The constant battle between our will, our desires, and our choices?”
—Libba Bray, Rebel Angels

23. “It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live.”
—J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

24. “It’s like the people who believe they’ll be happy if they go and live somewhere else, but who learn it doesn’t work that way. Wherever you go, you take yourself with you. If you see what I mean.”
—Neil Gaiman, The Graveyard Book

25. “I can tell you that the end of a life is the sum of the love that was lived in it, that whatever you think you have sworn, being here at the end of Jem’s life is not what is important. It was being here for every other moment.”
—Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Princess

26. “Life, with its rules, its obligations, and its freedoms, is like a sonnet: You’re given the form, but you have to write the sonnet yourself.”
—Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle In Time

27. “Maybe who we are isn’t so much about what we do, but rather what we’re capable of when we least expect it”
—Jodi Picoult, My Sister’s Keeper

28. “People never really died. They only went on to a better place, to wait a while for their loved ones to join them. And then once more they went back to the world, in the same way they had arrived the first time around.”
―V.C. Andrews, Flowers in the Attic

29. “Goodbye, I say, goodbye, as I disappear little by little into the middle of the middle of my own spectacular now.”
—Tim Tharp, The Spectacular Now

30. “But if I’m it, the last of my kind, the last page of human history, like hell I’m going to let the story end this way…Because if I am the last one, then I am humanity. And if this is humanity’s last war, then I am the battlefield.”
—Rick Yancey, The 5th Wave

31. “The words were on their way, and when they arrived, she would hold them in her hands like clouds, and she would ring them out like the rain.”
—Markus Zusak, The Book Thief

32. “Child, no one is ever ready for anything. I would never doom you to that. What sort of adventureless life would that be?”
—Alethea Kontis, Enchanted

33. “And now that you don’t have to be perfect, you can be good.”
—John Steinbeck, East of Eden

34. “Maybe some people are just meant to be in the same story.”
―Jandy Nelson, I’ll Give You the Sun

35. “If there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s this: We all want everything to be okay. We don’t even wish so much for fantastic or marvelous or outstanding. We will happily settle for okay, because most of the time, okay is enough.”
—David Levithan, Every Day

36. “Doubt everything at least once. What you decide to keep, you’ll be able to be confident of. And what you decide to ditch, you will replace with what your instincts tell you is true.”
―Amy Plum, After the End

37. “Just as a river by night shines with the reflected light of the moon, so too do you shine with the light of your family, your people, and your God. So you are never far from home, never alone, wherever you go.”
—Karen Cushman, Catherine Called Birdy

38. “You spend your whole life stuck in the labyrinth, thinking about how you’ll escape it one day, and how awesome it will be, and imagining that future keeps you going, but you never do it. You just use the future to escape the present.”
—John Green, Looking for Alaska

39. “There’s no shame in fear, my father told me, what matters is how we face it.”
—George R.R. Martin, A Clash of Kings

40. “I know that the whole point—the only point—is to find the things that matter, and hold on to them, and fight for them, and refuse to let them go.”
—Lauren Oliver, Delirium

41. “We feel cold, but we don’t mind it, because we will not come to harm. And if we wrapped up against the cold, we wouldn’t feel other things, like the bright tingle of the stars, or the music of the aurora, or best of all the silky feeling of moonlight on our skin. It’s worth being cold for that.”
—Philip Pullman, The Golden Compass

42. “It’s a lot easier to be lost than found. It’s the reason we’re always searching and rarely discovered—so many locks not enough keys.”
―Sarah Dessen, Lock and Key

43. “On that cold night in January it all slipped into place for me and she became my everything and my everyone. My music, my sun, my words, my logic, my confusion, my flaw.”
—Julie Murphy, Side Effects May Vary

44. “Hope? Hope can be a powerful force. Maybe there’s no actual magic in it, but when you know what you hope for most and hold it like a light within you, you can make things happen, almost like magic.”
—Laini Taylor, Daughter of Smoke and Bone

45. “[She] had always suffered from a vague restlessness, a longing for adventure that she told herself severely was the result of reading too many novels when she was a small child.”
—Robin McKinley, The Blue Sword

46. “Youth cannot know how age thinks and feels, but old men are guilty if they forget what it was to be young.”
—J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix 

The people who believe they’ll be happy if they go and live somewhere else … learn it doesn’t work that way. Wherever you go, you take yourself with you.
—  Neil Gaiman
... Somehow, Still Talking About This Captain America Shit (Now With Bonus Spider-Man and Agents of SHIELD)

So now Secret Empire has revealed its Shyamalan Twist and given the readers a Good Guy Steve Rogers as well as Hydra Cap, and the kinds of dickbags who, when this whole bullshit began were dismissing people’s complaints with “oh come on, don’t you know how comics works, it’s all going to be put back at the end, blah blah blah…” are crowing I-Told-You-So’s.

But here’s the thing:

Yeah, fucknuts.  We always knew this.

Keep reading

3
little spoon

To save money while attending college in NYC, Stiles and Derek decide to rent one tiny apartment together. With one bed.

*whispers* I have no idea if any of this is realistic. Don’t judge me.

You guys know by now that practically everything I write is so so fluffy, but this is just like, a whole other level. A little over 4k words of enemies-to-lovers, bed-sharing, & cuddling. ;)  

on ao3

*

The thing is, Stiles is pretty sure he can’t afford to breathe the air in New York City, let alone rent an apartment there. But it’s also been his lifelong dream to go to NYU, same as his mom, and he’s just gotten his acceptance letter in the mail along with a hefty scholarship offer. So he has a bit of a conundrum on his hands.

Enter Derek, who has a (relatively) dirt cheap apartment in Queens.

Okay, so Derek calls it an “apartment.” Stiles calls it an “attic closet.”

It’s nothing but a narrow bed, a foot or so of walking space between that and the wall, and a lone shelf by the door to hold the microwave and all of Derek’s possessions that can’t fit under the bed. There’s not even enough room to open the door all the way; the edge of the door hits the edge of the bed, and then you have to shimmy into the room.

The sad thing is that Stiles can’t even afford that.

He can, however, afford half of it.

“So you’re going to share a bed,” Scott says, looking concerned.

“Yes,” Stiles says.

“No,” Derek says at the same time.

Scott looks more concerned.

Stiles sighs. “Okay, so it’s like this. Derek’s going to be doing the whole normal person schedule, up at the buttcrack of dawn” (Derek rolls his eyes) “and out working and studying and stuff all day and back in bed asleep by 11 pm, and I’m going to be taking all evening classes and working the night shift!”

“We won’t actually ever be in the same place at the same time,” Derek clarifies. “He gets it during the day; I get it at night.”

“Because we can’t stand each other,” Stiles adds, in case Scott is thinking of getting his hopes up that this whole roommates thing is going to be some kind of bromance.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Harry Potter grew up in Middle Class England in the 1980s and didn't know the concept of racism until he was 12, so while I'm fine with race flips, Harry Potter just really has to be white. Same goes for Hermione tbh despite what JK says because she lived in upper class areas of London.

i love how this always happens whenever anyone dares suggesting that a fantasy series needs more POC - hippogriffs, dragons and dementors are fine but GOD IS THIS A BROWN PERSON THAT’S SO UNREALISTIC OMG

Every Trump diss in The Bold Type 1x09
  • “how many times does trump have to come back here? doesn’t he live somewhere else now?”
  • “on account of THAT MAN.”
  • “an evisceration of this administration’s immigration policy… the president really has things screwed up here.”
  • massive groups of protesters outside yelling “deport trump! deport trump!”
  • “because…?” [sardonically] “trump.” “so..vodka?”
  • “aces trump jacks. drink.” “you just said the no-no word. take a drink.”
  • “alex said he saw a small orange blur.” “i said i thought i saw the motorcade.” “same thing.”
  • jacqueline trying to convince the restaurant owner to kick trump out. “we all need to get on with our lives.”
  • “number 45″

When she joined a “swim-in” in St. Augustine, Florida on June 18, 1964, then 17-year-old Mamie Nell Ford had little idea that her picture would soon be seen around the world – and help spur the passage of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964. On that day, seven civil rights activists, including Ford, jumped into the segregated pool at the Monson Motor Lodge to protest its ‘whites-only’ policy. As journalists looked on, the motel owner’s James Brock responded by dumping acid into the pool in an effort to drive them out. Ford recalls that her immediate reaction was “I couldn’t breathe,” and a photo of her with an alarmed expression as Brock pours acid nearby appeared in newspapers around the world. When people learn about the incident today, Ford says, “I’m often asked, ‘How could you have so much courage?’ Courage for me is not ‘the absence of fear,’ but what you do in the face of fear.”

The campaign to challenge segregation in St. Augustine in 1963 and 1964, known as the St. Augustine Movement, is considered one of the bloodiest of the Civil Rights Movement. Students staging “wade-ins” to challenge segregation on the beaches were violently beaten and, after several black children were admitted into white schools due to the Supreme Court’s decision outlawing school segregation, several of the children’s homes were burnt to the ground by local segregationists. Martin Luther King, Jr. was even arrested on the steps of this same motel only a week prior to the pool “swim-in,” after being charged with trespassing when he attempted to dine at the “whites-only” Monson Restaurant.

Prior to the pool “swim-in”, Ford was already an experienced civil rights activist in her hometown of Albany, Georgia. When Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference came to Albany to recruit activists to support the movement in St. Augustine, she immediately signed up. “When they asked for volunteers to participate in the swim-in demonstration, I said, yes, because, despite segregation, I knew how to swim,” she says. While they knew it was likely they would be arrested, no one expected the owner to pour acid into the pool. “It is as fresh in my mind as the morning dew, because when the acid was poured in the pool, the water began to bubble up,” Ford recalls. Although the group was arrested shortly thereafter, their protest had the intended effect: as it made headlines worldwide, President Johnson said in a recorded phone conservation: “Our whole foreign policy will go to hell over this!” Within 24 hours, the civil rights bill that had been introduced a year before and had been stalled in the Senate won approval, leading directly to the passage of the historic Civil Rights Act of 1964.

After being released from serving jail time for the swim-in, Ford made a powerful statement urging the people of St. Augustine to keep fighting: “Don’t lose heart now because you’re the ones on whom this movement rests. People will come and go because they live somewhere else, but you live here and you make this thing happen.” She returned home and went on to join five other black girls to lead the desegregation of the formerly all-white Albany High School, where she graduated with honors in 1965. Ford, who later changed her name to Mimi Jones, then went to college in Boston where she spent her career working in the Department of Education.

Although less well known than school segregation, the long legacy of segregation in swimming pools still lives on today. After legal challenges and actions like this one in St. Augustine forced the end of segregated pools, in many towns, especially in the South, ‘white flight’ from public pools to private clubs often led to their closure. The impact of first segregation and later pool closures over generations has led to a major gap between white and black Americans in swimming ability, with whites being twice as likely to know how to swim as blacks. This difference is also reflected in the CDC finding that black children are three times more likely die from drowning than white children. For these reasons and the long legacy of racism at swimming pools, Simone Manuel’s victory at the last Olympic Games took on special meaning for many African Americans – a significance the young swimmer alluded to after she became the first African-American woman to ever win an individual Olympic gold in swimming: “The gold medal wasn’t just for me,“ she said. "It’s for a lot of people who came before me.”

Picture and text from "A Mighty Girl” on Facebook

Shout out to native wlw who are dark skinned

Shout out to native wlw who are light skinned

Shout out to native wlw who can speak their native language

Shout out to native wlw who can’t speak their native language

Shout out to native wlw who knows tons about their history

Shout out to native wlw who know very little or just learning

Shout out to native wlw who are just coming to terms with their sexuality

Shout out to native wlw who have been comfortable with their sexuality for a long time

Shout out to native wlw who aren’t comfortable with their sexuality

Shout out to native wlw who are closeted

Shout out to native wlw who are out

Shout out to native wlw who live in the Americas

Shout out to native wlw who live somewhere else in the world (because they exist too!!)

Shout out to native wlw who live on reserves

Shout out to native wlw who don’t

Shout out to all the native wlw because you guys are important and loved! I’m proud of you all!!

Telescope

by Louise Glück

There is a moment after you move your eye away
when you forget where you are
because you’ve been living, it seems,
somewhere else, in the silence of the night sky.

You’ve stopped being here in the world.
You’re in a different place,
a place where human life has no meaning.

You’re not a creature in a body.
You exist as the stars exist,
participating in their stillness, their immensity.

Then you’re in the world again.
At night, on a cold hill,
taking the telescope apart.

You realize afterward
not that the image is false
but the relation is false.

You see again how far away
each thing is from every other thing.

anonymous asked:

I'm having some problems to get a character from a place to other. Basically, her parents died a while ago and she's living somewhere else. She lived in their parents' manor, now she lives at a relative's, and has just discovered a (magic) artifact that may belong to her mother, but she doesn't give it much importance. I want her to go to the manor but don't know how to set up the necessity. A young naughty girl may activate the artifact and raise questions, but don't know if it's good enough.

Unmovable Plot Facts (or what I like to call Very Important Facts - V.I.F.)

This sounds like a case of: “I need event B to happen, but it can’t happen unless event A happens, but event A has no logical reason to happen.”

It’s rare that we ever plot stories in a linear way, that is, we hardly ever plot our stories out in order. We often get ideas for much later in the story, and then we have to backtrack to figure out how we make those ideas happen. And this can be really difficult to do when our ideas don’t seem to fit together. So how do we fix it?

  • Assume NOTHING about your plot.

When we’ve been working with a story for a long time, there are certain facts and details that have been part of the story since the beginning. These facts are so cemented in our minds that we don’t even question them anymore. Things like: So-and-so’s the villain, the story takes place in a forest, my character is new to all this crazy phenomena. 

But what if so-and-so wasn’t the villain? What if the story took place in a desert? What if your character is a seasoned pro to the extra-terrestrial or paranormal? 

Whenever a story fact is proving to be inflexible and immovable, to the point where your story can’t operate around it, it’s time to make a change.

And it can be scary to make that change, especially when we’ve been plotting the story for so long with these facts in mind. But if we need event B to happen, and the event supposedly causing event B to happen (event A) is a longshot, then maybe we need another event to cause event B. 

TO MY ANON: What that means is, rather than coming up with a reason to get her to the manor, why can’t she already be there? Isn’t it possible that after her parents died, they willed her the home, and she moved back in? Could she have found the artifact while cleaning out an area of the house as she was moving back in? Or even years later when she suddenly needs the extra storage space/living space?

When changing one fact, you might argue that you can’t change said fact, because then you’ll have to change another fact, and what if you end up changing the whole story? Maybe you will, I don’t know. The goal is figuring out what facts of your story are most important, and if you can’t work out how to make other facts work with those Very Important Facts (V.I.F.), then those less important ones will have to change. 

  • Examine the V.I.F. itself and decide if it truly is a V.I.F.

So in my last point, I talked about changing event A entirely to work with event B (our V.I.F.), and in the case of the anon, event A is our character returning home, and event B is the character finding the magical artifact. She cannot find the artifact unless she goes home. If you can’t come up with ideas for how to get her to the manor, and you can’t really change the fact that she no longer lives there, then you have to examine what event B is actually doing for your plot, and decide if perhaps there is another V.I.F. that events B/A are getting in the way of.

In this step, ask yourself: what is my story’s conflict? And once you’ve defined that in one sentence, determine how many different paths there are available to getting there. Is event B directly tied to your conflict? Or is it merely one option of jumpstarting the real V.I.F.? 

For example, if the conflict of our anon’s story had to do with our protagonist inadvertently activating this artifact and then becoming involved in some epic quest to stop a great evil, there are actually numerous ways of getting there. Some questions we might ask:

  • Does the artifact have to be a family heirloom?
  • Does she have to discover it after her parents are deceased?
  • Could the artifact have been passed down to her years ago, got lost in a box, and resurfaced at the onset of our story?
  • Could she find it in an antiques store?
  • Could a friend find it and give it to her as a gift?

The important part of this story may not be how she comes by the artifact; instead, it could be what happens as a result. In which case, you could explore other options for getting it in her hands and activating it. 

  • For a rough draft, skip A entirely. Focus on B, because B gets you to C.

My last option for solving this problem is basically to ignore it. If you’re working on a first draft, or even a second draft of the story, and you can’t get over this one problem, then solve it by ignoring it. For our anon, if you can’t come up with a reason for her to go to the manor, then simply say: “She decided to go to the manor,” and let that be the end to it…for now. 

Because allowing yourself to skip event A enables you to focus on fleshing out event B - something you seem much clearer on- so you can move forward with the story. When we’re working with drafts, it’s best to work on the parts that exist most vividly in our minds, and then work on stringing them together in whatever haphazard way we need to. Cohesion and structuring will come later on, once we know a little more about what we’ve created. 

One last note to my anon: Try not to get too stuck on this detail. Change the setup if you need to, in order to make it work, or gloss over it until you’ve got more of the meat of the story written. As you’re writing the middle, you might come up with some amazing backstory detail that helps explain how everything started, and it may have nothing to do with her going to the manor. 

I hope this wasn’t a confusing post! I tried my best, but I think what it comes down to is accepting that your plot should be flexible, and you should be willing to change details to work with other details, rather than trying to force them to work together when they don’t. 

-Rebekah

MBTI types and Neil Gaiman (also books) Quotes

INTJ: I want people to imagine. I think that your imagination is the most important tool that you possess

INTP: All your questions can be answered, if that is what you want. But once you learn your answer, you can never unlearn them

ENTJ: You get what anybody gets - you get a lifetime

ENTP: Break the rules. Leave the world more interesting for your being here

INFJ: Things need not have happened to be true. Tales and dreams are the shadow-truths that will endure when mere facts are dust and ashes, and forgot

INFP: Sometimes you wake up. Sometimes the fall kills you. Sometimes, when you fall, you fly

ENFJ: There are so many fragile things, after all. People break so easily, and so do dreams and hearts

ENFP: Because - she said - When you’re scared but you do it anyway, that’s brave

ISFJ: People believe they’ll go and live somewhere else, but it doesn’t work that way. Wherever you go, you take yourself with you.

ISFP: You’re always you, and that don’t change, and you’re always changing, and there’s nothing you can do about it

ESFJ: You’ve a good heart. Sometimes that’s enough to see you safe wherever you go. But mostly, it’s not

ESFP: Face your life, its pain, its pleasure. Leave no path untaken

ISTJ: Hearts may break, but hearts are the toughest of muscles, able to pump for a lifetime, 70 times a minute, and scarcely falter along the way

ISTP: The truth is it’s not the idea. It’s never the idea. It’s always what you do with it

ESTJ: Finish things whatever it takes to finish things. Finish, you will learn more from glorious failure than you ever will from something you never finish

ESTP: I think hell is something you carry around with you, not somewhere you go

Twilight conversations - Jughead Jones Imagine (Riverdale)

Originally posted by diltons

Warnings: none

Request: Anon: 7, 3, 25 with Jughead Jones please

3. “Oh, love,” I don’t think you know the meaning of sarcasm.“

7. “Honestly, if you wanted sex this bad you could’ve just told me!”

25. “That lip biting’s getting a little out of hand,”

Summary: Jughead and the reader have their weekly movie night.

You love Saturday Nights. Its your movie with Jughead. You guys have been having a movie night ever since you were old enough to sit still through a movie. Eventually, due to time, age and circumstance, you guys starting holding them at the Twilight. When you guys started dating, movie night became date night. Although you hardly ever did something other than watch movies, you always loved spending one-on-one time with your raven haired lover. Tonight was your pick for the twilight. You guys take turns on who picks the first movie at the twilight and then you guys both pick the rest of them. Rocking on the balls of your feet, you search the crowd of adolescents for his iconic grey beanie. A grin breaks out on your face you spot him and eagerly await him so you can both make your way to his “residence”. You were the only one aside from his family to know about his living situation and you constantly kept trying to get him to live somewhere else. He ignores you now when you try to bring it up so you leave him be but you never let it go.

“That lip biting’s getting a little out of hand,” your boyfriend smirks in front of you. Your attention snaps back to him and you smile and kiss him.

“Hello to you too,” you remark grabbing his hand, “can we go yet?”

“Someone’s eager,”

“Yea, well, its my pick tonight,” you grin at him.

“Oh god, with a grin like that, what fresh hell are you going to unleash at the drive in tonight?”

“Its not that bad…” he just quirks an eyebrow in response.

“Its (Y/F/M)!” You giggle looking at him to see his response. His reaction was almost a deadpan.

“Really? (Y/F/M) again?”

“Yes…its been a month since the last time we watched it,”

“(Y/N)… you do realise that we’ve watched that every 2nd time you choose for the last 2 months,”

“So we can’t watch it?” You pout. He just rolls his eyes at your childish behaviour before a smile graces his lips.

“I didn’t say that,” he says turning to you.

“Yay!!” You giggle again, and your boyfriend just watches your childish behaviour in a movement.

“You’re such a child,” his comment is met with you poking your tongue out. You both face where you’re walking and the conversation remains as a comfortable silence until you get to the Twilight.

“Omg Juggy, do you ever clean up?” You remark as you see his shirts strewn across the floor, “like the space isn’t that big!”

“I’ve been busy really lately,”

“Your novel doesn’t count,”

“Who said it was my novel?”

“Well the only thing you do is go to Pop’s, write your novel, shove in a movie every 2 hours three times a night and hang out with me whenever you get writer’s block,”

“I don’t hang out with you just when I’ve got writer’s block,”

“Oh excuse me Casanova, our movie nights are more than enough,” you tease. Again, he just responds with rolling his eyes. You sit down on his “bed” and look around before approaching his desk and picking up the picture of him and Jellybean.

“Hey Juggie,”

“Yes?” He looks up from shoving his clothes into his bag.

“Do you ever miss having a family?” He just sighs before standing up.

“Yes,”

“How do you deal with it?”

“Well I found someone who means the world to me and who is both my family and my home,” he answers walking towards you and cradling your face, never losing eye contact. You clear your throat before you make a reply not trusting your words to not betray how much that statement actually meant to you.

“I love you too,” he gains a twinkle in his eye before he briefly kisses you.

“Never said that someone was you,” he sasses with a look you’ve seen many a time.

“Such a romantic! Just take me now,” you sarcastically reply, grabbing his head and passionately kissing him.

“Honestly, if you wanted sex this bad you could’ve just told me”

“Oh, love, I don’t think you know the meaning of sarcasm.”

“Sweetheart,” he tutts, “I am the embodiment of sarcasm.” He grins before kissing you again. Hearing commotion outside you see that it was almost time for Jughead to put in the movie.

“So the Godfather?” You push him away as he chuckles, putting your favourite movie on.

Yea, movie night with Jughead are always the best.

A/N: I hope you all like it :)

Y/N = your name

Y/F/M = your favourite movie

bookwyrmling  asked:

“No, like…. It’s just, I can’t believe you’re actually wearing my clothes.” Nurseydex b/c I know you love them.

Here’s something I should have answered uhhhhhh months ago. Sorry, lol. 

NurseyDex, 1.9k. Unbeta’d and barely read over, so sorry bout that lol. Technically fills @nurseydexweek Day 2! More under cut.


“And that’s the last bit of your integral chart. Don’t forget, quiz on Monday, test on Wednesday!” Before his professor could even finish reminding them about the upcoming assessments, Dex had packed up his stuff and bolted for the door. He had approximately three hours before his Python midterm, and six hours of studying to do.

And then, of course, right as he reached the front door of Founder’s, some guy coming out slammed into him, spilling hot coffee down his front. The guy huffed, and dropped his cup in the trash can. “Watch where you’re going, dude.”

Dex cursed, pulling his shirt away from his body. He wanted to cuss the guy out, do something, but he was already walking away by the time Dex got up the courage to tell him to go fuck himself.

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