live in africa

hadesboyfriend  asked:

hey, ever since I was little I wanted to go and travel the world (for context I live in south africa) and ever since I discovered that I'm trans I've been heartbroken cause it seems logistically impossible to follow my dreams and transition at the same time, I want to travel europe but to get citizenship is really complaicated and I need that to travel long term and stay on testosterone, and yeah in short I'm heartbroken cause I can't follow my dream and transition at the same time

Well citizenship is tricky, no sugar coating that, but your hospital will link you to another wherever you’re going to get your prescription filled. When I came over to Sweden (packing a Ugandan passport, mind you) I got my prescriptions filled within days and had a doctor visit in the first month. I think EU countries are similar in this sense.

- Michael

10

“Through contemporary eyes, the static shots and urban milieus of Black Girl seem to solidify Sembène’s filmmaking as an aesthetic neighbor to the emotionally-walloping neorealism of the Italian De Sica. Black Girl may not evoke the immediate adoration of something as universally beloved as De Sica’s Bicycle Thieves, although the latter film’s deft interweaving of personal-is-political social commentary with the rueful, everyday messiness of the lives of the marginalized working class began a storytelling tradition that is gloriously carried on by Sembène. Black Girl has all the skillful stylistic simplicity of your typical piece of neorealism but also packs a sharper bite and it’s electrifying to watch Sembène craft a twisty drama with the piano-chord tautness of a thriller that is nonetheless coated in such a rare and wryly intimate form of humanity.”

Read more: OUSMANE SEMBÈNE’S BLACK GIRL IS ONE OF THE YEAR’S MOST IMPORTANT CINEMATIC EVENTS by Matthew Eng

ARTNOIR + Black Lives Matter: Black Futures Month || ANSWER TIME on February 14th, 10am (PST) || 1pm (EST)

Submit Your Questions Here

ARTNOIR is excited to be collaborating with Black Lives Matter on their Black Futures Month project during Black History Month. This project is designed to inspire people during this challenging social & political climate through art and the written word to dream about tomorrow today. 

Each day in February, Black Lives Matter will release an original piece of art and an accompanying written piece to reclaim Black History Month and demonstrate the importance of using art as both an inspiration and an organizing tool. Artists from around the world have been commissioned to use their genius to promulgate the conversation about systemic racism and violence against Black people.

Today we are thrilled to co-host an interactive Q&A with visual artist Delano Dunn, digital all-rounder Babusi Nyoni and organizer/writer Miski Noor for a candid and spirited conversation via Tumblr’s Answer Time series. 

Our conversation explores how visual art and writing can serve as a platform to discuss pressing issues that impact Black communities throughout the diaspora from education to immigration.

Send us your questions and join the conversation live on  February 14th, 10am (PST) || 1pm (EST) on our Tumblr site.