little-nemo

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LITTLE NEMO: DREAM ANOTHER DREAM

by Bill Sienkiewicz, Jim Rugg, Box Brown, Denis Kitchen, Paul Pope, Craig Thompson, Farel Dalrymple, et al

Published by Locust Moon Press

Over 100 of today’s best cartoonists pay tribute to comics’ greatest innovator, Winsor McCay, in one giant book. In this 144-page, 16" x 21" hardcover, many of the world’s finest creators have dreamed up new Little Nemo in Slumberland strips, following their own voices down paths lit by McCay.

Taking on the same giant, broadsheet newspaper-sized canvas as McCay, artists such as Michael Allred, Paul Pope, Yuko Shimizu, J.H. Williams III, Charles Vess, David Mack, J.G. Jones, Craig Thompson, Paolo Rivera, Carla Speed McNeil, Bill Sienkiewicz, P. Craig Russell, Ronald Wimberly, Denis Kitchen, Jill Thompson, Stephen R. Bissette, Gabriel Bá & Fábio Moon, Farel Dalrymple, John Cassaday, Peter Bagge, Cliff Chiang, and over a hundred more have all done some of the very best work of their illustrious careers.

This is a love song for Winsor McCay, Little Nemo, and the infinite possibility of comics.

144 pages, color, 16” x 21” hardcover

ISBN: 978-0-9899076-9-9

Advance debut at SPX: September 13, 2014
Wide release at LMCF: October 25, 2014

$124.99

Order here

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Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland gif request by roboboners: bonbon/candy servants gifs

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SHANOWER & RODRIGUEZ ‘RETURN TO SLUMBERLAND’ IN GORGEOUS NEW ‘LITTLE NEMO’ SERIES THIS WEEK

By Chris Sims

Just in case you’re not up to speed on classic newspaper strips, Winsor McKay’s Little Nemo is one of the most innovative comics of the 20th century. Originally running in newspapers from 1905 to 1926, it was arguably one of the first real masterpieces of the form, with McKay’s surreal dreamscapes taking the form of beautiful imagery and page layouts that creators are still trying to recreate today.

Now, Nemo is returning to the comics page in Return To Slumberland. Not to be confused with the forthcoming Dream Another Dream anthology, this new series from Eric ShanowerGabriel Rodriguez and Nelson Daniel launches this week from IDW Publishing, and it is beautiful. Seriously, just hands down one of the prettiest comics I’ve seen in a long time, and even though the first few pages don’t quite get into the strangeness of walking beds and stair-step city skylines, I get the feeling that all of that stuff shows up right where the preview ends.

PREVIEW PAGES AT COMICS ALLIANCE

Little Nemo and the Princess

Windsor McKay’s Little Nemo comics have been a huge inspiration for me, and a huge influence on my work, so I was very excited to be asked to contribute a limited edition print to Locust Moon Comic’s anthology project Little Nemo: Dream Another Dream.

The book is funding on Kickstarter right now, and it’s going to be amazing - the list of contributors is mind-blowing, and the art on display is phenomenal. The book is going to be printed at the original broadsheet newspaper size, the way the original comics were meant to be viewed. If you’re a fan of Little Nemo, or a collector of art books of any kind, you definitely don’t want to miss this one!

Check out the Kickstarter page here!

Little Nemo: Dream Another Dream, part 2

Part two of my blog where I explain the writing process for my Little Nemo comic, which I produced for the Dream Another Dream Kickstarter project (which, as of my writing this, has a week left to go).

In the previous part, I detailed the four criteria I needed to adhere to if I was going to make my comic stand comfortably next to the work of Winsor McCay. 


1.) It had to feel like a dream. 

2.) The layout needed to be carefully considered. 

3.) I had to care about the characters. 

4.) I had to be authentic to the period. 


So, here’s how I did it.

1. MAKING IT FEEL LIKE A DREAM 


So one of my observations about McCay’s ‘dream’ comics- Rarebit Fiend and Little Nemo- is that they don’t feel like dreams. They’re beautiful, but they don’t seem to capture the frustration and the weird structural logic that dreams have.

While I was writing the comic I’m currently working on for Image, I started reading writer Dan Harmon’s brilliant series of essays about story structure (click here, scroll down to “essays”). He distilled the teachings of mythologist Joseph Campbell down to a very simple formula, expressed in the diagram below. All good stories, Harmon writes, take the same basic form, a form dictated by our basic evolutionary programming- 


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