little-men

9

Favorite Films, 2016

  1. Moonlight (dir. Barry Jenkins)
  2. Lemonade (dir. Kahlil Joseph and Beyoncé Knowles Carter)
  3. Certain Women (dir. Kelly Reichardt)
  4. Little Men (dir. Ira Sachs)
  5. Elle (dir. Paul Verhoeven)
  6. 13th (dir. Ava Duvernay)
  7. American Honey (dir. Andrea Arnold)
  8. The Fits (dir. Anna Rose Holmer)
  9. Green Room (dir. Jeremy Saulnier)
  10. 88:88 (dir. Isiah Medina)
  11. Toni Erdmann (dir. Maren Ade)
  12. 20th Century Women (dir. Mike Mills)
  13. Pete’s Dragon (dir. David Lowery)
  14. Personal Shopper (dir. Olivier Assayas)
  15. The Handmaiden (dir. Park Chan-wook)
  16. Paterson (dir. Jim Jarmusch) 
  17. Neon Bull (dir. Gabriel Mascaro)
  18. The Invitation (dir. Karyn Kusama)
  19. 10 Cloverfield Lane (dir. Dan Trachtenberg)
  20. La La Land (dir. Damien Chazelle)
  21. Mountains May Depart (dir. Jia Zhangke)
  22. Wiener-Dog (dir. Todd Solondz)
  23. The Love Witch (dir. Anna Biller)
  24. Everybody Wants Some!! (dir. Richard Linklater)
  25. The Eyes of My Mother (dir. Nicolas Pesce)

Honorable Mentions (in alphabetical order): Arrival (dir. Denis Villeneuve) | Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice (dir. Zack Snyder) | A Bigger Splash (dir. Luca Guadagnino) | Don’t Breathe (dir. Fede Alvarez) | Jackie (dir. Pablo Larraín) | Julieta (dir. Pedro Almodóvar) | Krisha (dir. Trey Edward Shults) | Kubo and the Two Strings (dir. Travis Knight) | Louder Than Bombs (dir. Joachim Trier) | Manchester by the Sea (dir. Kenneth Lonergan) | No Home Movie (dir. Chantal Akerman) Things to Come (dir. Mia Hansen-Løve) | Train to Busan (dir. Yeon Sang-ho) | The Wailing (dir. Na Hong-jin) | The Witch (dir. Robert Eggers)

Films I Missed: Aquarius | Cameraperson | Cosmos | The Edge of SeventeenEmbrace of the Serpent | Fences | Fire at Sea | Henry Gamble’s Birthday Party | Hidden Figures | I Am Not Your Negro A Monster CallsNeruda | Nocturama O.J.: Made in America | The Ornithologist | Right Now, Wrong Then | Shin Godzilla | The Woman Who Left

vimeo

after a stupid long time, i’m finally able to post my rmit grad film, for fear of little men! this thing represents 8 months of delirious work surviving off pizza shapes and academic fear alongside my friends, please enjoy

if your idea of a transgender man is a skinny, white 14 year old wearing a binder with a dyed undercut and a fucking flowercrown then you’re transphobic 

if you call trans men ‘soft boys’ ‘sweet babies’ or anything in the: ‘uwu my little boys’ ‘sweeties’ ‘kids’ ‘boys’ category then you really need to re-evaluate how you see transgender people. we aren’t all children and young teens. transgender adults exist, transgender elders exist, and besides that, don’t you think teens and kids deserve a little more respect?

trans men are a diverse group of people who dont have to conform to your weirdly specific idea of what a trans man is.

we aren’t all thin, prepubescent, white people with cutesy tumblr aesthetics.

grow up and stop with the condescending attitude towards transgender men

10

Rhodé Marshall-

“The late Karabo Mokoena’s beautiful smile has sparkled across my timeline for more than a week.

Her friends and family have been pleading for help finding her since her disappearance on April 28.

Then that smile was replaced by pictures of what’s believed to be the place where her body was burnt.

“The boyfriend confessed. He killed and burnt my daughter,” read a Facebook post by her father.

I can’t begin to imagine the rage her family and friends must be feeling.

Someone they trusted, who pretended not to know where she was, who “helped” look for her, had taken her life.

Here’s the reality: one in every four womxn in South Africa is physically abused by an intimate partner.

Every six hours a womxn is killed by a current or former intimate partner.

These numbers are shocking. These numbers aren’t dropping. South African womxn are under attack and they are afraid.

Battling to come to terms with Karabo’s story, womxn online began sharing their experiences of abuse and #MenAreTrash trended.

But of course, the louder womxn’s voices grow, the louder the challenge from men, and soon enough #WomenAreTrash was a thing.

Posts were shared where men schooled womxn on trusting too easily, on being more cautious, telling us how to live our lives.

Again, there was very little reflection by men on what womxn were saying when they uttered the words “men are trash”.

Will we ever get to the point where schooling aimed at men is as vigorous as the defence of them?

Men just aren’t being regulated the way women are.

It’s men who need the wake-up call.

It’s your sons, brothers and friends who need to be taught that they own no part of any womxn.

It’s your sons who need to be taught how to handle disappointment, jealousy, anger and manage their rage.

Is it our responsibility to make men feel more secure or masculine, to nurse their egos?

At the helm of the “not all men are trash” declarations were the most worrying of them all: the woke misogynist.

The woke misogynist is the guy who talks loudly about gender equality and whose vocabulary is made up of all the right words, he calls himself a feminist – but is the same one outed for assaulting and belittling his partner.

While we were basically being told that, as South African womxn, we should be grateful for the opportunity to see another day, there was this immense amount of shared pain for the Mokoena family, known and unknown families that have lost their daughters, the families who are still looking for their daughters and every womxn who has had their fear of being the next victim trampled on by the woke misogynists who rose up in defence of the brotherhood.

While you think that you’re one of the good guys and will never lift a hand against a womxn, there are so many ways in which you inflict pain on us.

Making us doubt ourselves, our beauty and our worth.

Take a moment and think about how you, as a man, picked at a womxn’s confidence with things you deem to be little mistakes and misunderstandings, how you violently broke her confidence down.

Guys, we don’t just fear that you’ll rape and kill us, we also fear that you’ll abuse our kindness and trample on the sparkle you once saw.

That’s why we’re saying #MenAreTrash, dear woke men.

Stop being defensive and listen… Listen carefully and hold each other accountable.

Womxn are afraid”

Neutron Stars Are Weird!

There, we came right out and said it. They can’t help it; it’s just what happens when you have a star that’s heavier than our sun but as small as a city. Neutron stars give us access to crazy conditions that we can’t study directly on Earth.

Here are five facts about neutron stars that show sometimes they are stranger than science fiction!

1. Neutron stars start their lives with a bang

When a star bigger and more massive than our sun runs out of fuel at the end of its life, its core collapses while the outer layers are blown off in a supernova explosion. What is left behind depends on the mass of the original star. If it’s roughly 7 to 19 times the mass of our sun, we are left with a neutron star. If it started with more than 20 times the mass of our sun, it becomes a black hole.

2. Neutron stars contain the densest material that we can directly observe

While neutron stars’ dark cousins, black holes, might get all the attention, neutron stars are actually the densest material that we can directly observe. Black holes are hidden by their event horizon, so we can’t see what’s going on inside. However, neutron stars don’t have such shielding. To get an idea of how dense they are, one sugar cube of neutron star material would weigh about 1 trillion kilograms (or 1 billion tons) on Earth—about as much as a mountain. That is what happens when you cram a star with up to twice the mass of our sun into a sphere the diameter of a city.

3. Neutron stars can spin as fast as blender blades

Some neutron stars, called pulsars, emit streams of light that we see as flashes because the beams of light sweep in and out of our vision as the star rotates. The fastest known pulsar, named PSR J1748-2446ad, spins 43,000 times every minute. That’s twice as fast as the typical household blender! Over weeks, months or longer, pulsars pulse with more accuracy than an atomic clock, which excites astronomers about the possible applications of measuring the timing of these pulses.

4. Neutron stars are the strongest known magnets

Like many objects in space, including Earth, neutron stars have a magnetic field. While all known neutron stars have magnetic fields billions and trillions of times stronger than Earth’s, a type of neutron star known as a magnetar can have a magnetic field another thousand times stronger. These intense magnetic forces can cause starquakes on the surface of a magnetar, rupturing the star’s crust and producing brilliant flashes of gamma rays so powerful that they have been known to travel thousands of light-years across our Milky Way galaxy, causing measurable changes to Earth’s upper atmosphere.

5. Neutron stars’ pulses were originally thought to be possible alien signals

Beep. Beep. Beep. The discovery of pulsars began with a mystery in 1967 when astronomers picked up very regular radio flashes but couldn’t figure out what was causing them. The early researchers toyed briefly with the idea that it could be a signal from an alien civilization, an explanation that was discarded but lingered in their nickname for the original object—LGM-1, a nod to the “little green men” (it was later renamed PSR B1919+21). Of course, now scientists understand that pulsars are spinning neutron stars sending out light across a broad range of wavelengths that we detect as very regular pulses – but the first detections threw observers for a loop.

The Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) payload that is soon heading to the International Space Station will give astronomers more insight into neutron stars—helping us determine what is under the surface. Also, onboard NICER, the Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) experiment will test the use of pulsars as navigation beacons in space.

Want to learn even more about Neutron Stars? Watch this…

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

fandayo  asked:

Hi! I saw your small film and I was wondering if you could provide background information to it? I really loved the style and animation and the ending left me feeling so shocked bc I did not expect it to end the way it did. (It was p sad)

Hi! I hope you don’t mind if I post this publicly, I’ve had a few questions like this so I’ll give you guys some background on how it was made/my original intention. If you’re interested, I’ve put a lot of my development work in this tag.

From very early on in my development process I wanted to do some kind of fairytale. I wanted it to be kind of spooky, kind of sad, and kinda contemplative. I love the fluid nature of folk tales and myths and lore, in that they represent generations of fear and wonder being passed on and on and changed to represent the natures of the people telling them. I also love how environment-based they are. Some of my favourite stories growing up were stories those where the environment itself was a powerful narrative force. 

While looking for a fairytale to use as a baseline, I was recommended William Allingham’s ‘The Fairies’, which is where my title ended up coming from. I’d already been looking at stuff from Midsummer Night’s Dream and a favourite play of mine, ‘The Weir’, both of which alight on the topic of changelings, and it felt like a good place to start. Irish fairytales came up again and again, and it’s along those lines that I did the bulk of my research. Originally, my film was going to be majorly based on these lines:  

They stole little Bridget/For seven years long;/When she came down again/Her friends were all gone./They took her lightly back,/Between the night and morrow/They thought that she was fast asleep,/But she was dead with sorrow./They have kept her ever since/Deep within the lake,/On a bed of flag-leaves,/Watching till she wake.

The little girl in my film was referred to as Bridget throughout my production process, to my mind she is a changeling child taken long before the setting of the film. Originally the story was going to be about a traveller haunted by a ghostly girl, and who eventually discovers her body, kept preserved in the woods by fairies for years. Fairies are a chaotic, natural force, they’re a living embodiment of the environment they’re conjured out of. To my mind they’re completely amoral, they have no understanding nor interest in the consequences of their actions, which is also a trait I associate with young children. Combining those two forces to make Bridget my antagonist felt like a better way to upset my audience’s idea of right and wrong. Ultimately, Bridget is not ill intended, she’s not trying to trick the mother, she’s not trying to kill the baby. What she wants is a friend, and she just happens to have supernatural forces at her disposal to make that happen. 

I wanted the film to feel like a fairytale, but not disney. My style and mood references were Ivan Bilibin’s illustrations, Ghibli films like Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away, Frederick McCubbin’s paintings, and Over the Garden Wall. I wanted it to address the pervasive nature of storytelling, and how it can alter our choices and perspective (the innkeeper turning the mother away at the beginning is both foreshadowing and a comment on those who turn away the weak out of exaggerated, ignorant fear), and the inalienable power of natural forces over human beings. The mother is distraught and grief-stricken, but Bridget, and the fairies, and the forest, don’t care. She is nothing to these greater forces; her loss is completely senseless and awful and yet there is no greater evil to rail against. I don’t know if I achieved it, but I wanted the only malicious choice made in the whole film to be the innkeeper’s. The mother is a victim of natural forces, but she is first and foremost the victim of human indifference to her suffering. You cannot hold the fairies responsible for the death of her child any more than you could hold a drought responsible for the deaths of environmental refugees. Those to blame are those who saw people in need and did nothing, or worse; turned them away. 

Anyway this has gotten too long. Ultimately: I love horror stories, and I love nature as a narrative force, and I love examining storytelling as a moral tool, and to me, old fairytales encompass all of that. I wanted to make a spooky film with spooky woods and a spooky ghost child and that’s what I DID.

The Mysterious Little People of Alaska

The most common name for them is Inukin and they’re generally small in stature but big in strength and supernatural powers. They dress like Natives and have Native habits like smoking, but pull off their hats and hoods and you see their pointed little heads and ears.

In 1993, the Arctic Sounder ran accounts, republished in the Anchorage Daily News, from people who had seen or heard stories of Inukin. Flora Penn described seeing a little man sitting on the root of a driftwood tree smoking a pipe while she was out berry picking with a friend on a trip up the Noatak River in Northwest Alaska. 

“He had a pointed head, a big nose and pointed ears. We tried to hide and watch him for about an hour. He just smoked and looked around. Suddenly he jumped up and began to run toward the high mountains,” Penn told the Arctic Sounder.  Old stories say that the little people used to stay with the big people long ago. Until one time a little person’s child was playing with the big people’s kids. Just playing and a dog gobbled up the baby of the little person. Ever since then the little people could never stay among the people. 

Joe Sun a villager recalls a story her heard “I hear from my parents in the Maniilaq area that there was this man hunting. He had a real rifle. (Not the old kind that you had to load through the barrel with a rod.) He saw a caribou he wanted to get close to, to have a shot at it. He saw another person trying to hunt this caribou too. When this man, a big man, got close to shoot the caribou it changed into a little man. The big man jumped at the little man who escaped and began running and climbing up the mountain.”

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Little Men (2016) dir. Ira Sachs
“Hey. I’m not talking to my mother anymore. Why not? She said you can’t come over. Why doesn’t she want me over? I don’t know. I don’t think your dad wants me around anymore, either. I won’t talk to my parents, then, either. Really? Really. Not unless they apologize. It’s not gonna be easy, you sure you can handle it? I can handle it.
You’re a great friend, Jake.
You too.

NHL!Bitty, Part IX - ‘Loose Lips Sink Ships’

(Alright, you guys voted for #2, so enjoy!)

Eric gets hit on in a hotel bar during All-Star weekend. For the first time in a long time, it’s not because he’s a famous hockey player.

It would be very flattering, except the man trying to seduce him works for Jack’s PR firm, and bro is playing fast and loose with some seriously confidential information. 

NHL!Bitty Masterpost!


It’s been a long, exhausting day. Between the flight, check-in, the press junket, the photo ops, all Eric wants is to get a little bit drunk with the guys, grab some dinner, and fool around in Jack’s hotel room. Hopefully in that order, but he’s open to fooling around whenever.

He must have a dopey smile on his face thinking about the debauchery he’s been looking forward to all week when he realizes someone is watching him from across the bar. 

Tall, nice hair, professional, and he’s looking at Eric, no, at the empty chair next to him. And he’s walking over. 

“Is this seat taken?”

Keep reading

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List of alleged extraterrestrial beings that have been reported in close encounters, claimed or speculated to be associated with “Unidentified flying objects.” (left to right)

1-Flatwoods Monster:  Tall humanoid with a spade-shaped head 


2-Hopkinsville goblin:  Small, greenish-silver humanoids.


3-Greys:  Grey-skinned humanoids, usually 3–4 feet tall, bald, with black almond-shaped eyes, nostrils without a nose, slits for mouths, no ears and 3-4 fingers including thumb. They have been the centre of quite a few cases of alleged alien contact over the years 


4-Little green men:  Diminutive green humanoids. Even though a few abduction or contact cases have referred to green skin no report has ever involved anything that would fit the classic cultural stereotype of “Little Green Men”. They are included here only for cultural reference.

5-Reptilians:  Tall, scaly humanoids.

6-Nordic aliens: Humanoids with stereotypical “Nordic features” (tall, blond hair, blue eyes) and have featured in several cases of contact

SOURCE