little-adults

I haven’t like had a close friend since like 5 yrs ago and like if I put the total amount of time I actually had friends together it’d be like 2 years at the most I don’t even remember what it feels like to have a close friend or really even be close to anyone crIES

I religiously follow This American Life and a recent episode is particularly pertinent to this blog. “Birds & Bees” is about topics that are difficult to discuss with kids, and Act 3 specifically addresses death and grief for children. An excerpt:

“[The therapist] says children just grieve differently than adults, especially little children. They grieve in fits and starts. They can’t focus on it for very long. And grief is more physical for them.

They’ll act out their anger, maybe kick a door, which is the reason for the volcano room at The Sharing Place. They might also regress, suddenly using baby talk or sucking their thumbs. And if they’re potty trained, they might become untrained.

They’re also magical thinkers. I heard stories of kids who were afraid to go to sleep because grandma went to sleep and didn’t wake up. One little boy wandered away from his mom at the emergency room saying, ‘I’m looking for Dad. We left him here last time.’ Another boy said he just wanted to die for a few days so he can go to heaven and teach his little sister how to ride a tricycle.

Children also re-grieve. That is, with every new stage of development, they experience their grief anew. And with every milestone– when their braces come off, when they get their driver’s license, when they graduate– they’ll inevitably think, I wish my mom was here.”

I don’t really like the whole “I won’t commission an artist if they undercharge for their work” ideology because like your heart may be in the right place and you’re absolutely right in wanting to pay artists more but like, artists who undercharge need commissioners too??

In pricing my art I may try to give myself credit for the time and work I put into it but unfortunately I do have to take into consideration that my exposure is low and the crowd I’m appealing to is mostly made up of teens and young adults with little spending money. If I want to get any business at all I sacrifice what I have to in order to get it.

Like we definitely should continue to encourage artists to charge more for their work but telling people to just not buy from artists who don’t is really shitty tbh

10

Really happy with the May Owlcrate box. So far March has been my favorite. I wish the could have provided a signed book plate from V.E. Schawb like they have for last month and this month.

Included in this month’s box was:

  • A notebook with a quote from E.E. Cummings
  • Geektat temporary tattoos: Alice in Wonderland themed
  • Crazy Aaron’s Thinking Putty: Twilight
  • Magonia by Maria Dahvana Headley with a bookmark and signed bookplate
I HAVE A BACHELOR'S DEGREE!!!!!!!!!

I’m so sorry for being not super active lately I was finishing up school. Also if this doesn’t make sense I’m drunk hahaha! I finished my degree and as long as I pass boards I’m a nurse :) plus I have a job already in an emergency trauma center at a level 1 magnet hospital! We partied our asses off and threw our uniform scrubs in the bonfire :) I hope everyone is having as good of night as me!

I’m not a popcorn snob so I just grabbed a couple bags of off-brand regular and white cheddar, but I did make sure to buy each person’s favorite movie candy and Jarritos soda flavors, so at least there’s that if the popcorn is terrible. The 80s next generation moviefest begins soon. :)

(Previously.)

American Academy of Pediatrics Admits that Children Really are Little Adults
www.gomerblog.com

American Academy of Pediatrics Admits that Children Really are Little Adults

Washington, D.C. – A year-long undercover investigation into the American Academy of Pediatrics’ claim that pediatric patient management was distinct from that of adults has revealed widespread evidence to the contrary.

Are you ready for you fem-pop bypass?

Faced with a crushing epidemic of ovarian cancers, post-CABG MIs, and amyloidosis, the nation’s pediatric departments began steadily consulting their internal medicine colleagues for management tips. Medicine resident William Quiroga was one of the first to blow the whistle. “At first it was just a trickle, but then I was getting slammed every time I was on consults with 5-6 requests a day from the pediatrics department. I would see the patient and give recommendations, and note that they were followed to the letter. Sometimes the peds resident would make a big show about calculating drug dosages by weight or something just to contribute, but then when I would come back I would see my original dosage was re-ordered.”

Dan Cortas, an orthopedics resident, also contributed to the investigation. “I got a page to the NICU on a 6-day old. I was expecting a skeletal dysplasia, maybe some osteogenesis imperfecta—you know, the congenital stuff they make you memorize in med school. Instead it was a intratrochanteric hip fracture from a mechanical fall.”

Cortas put the patient in traction in preparation for the OR. “In the past I would have ordered conscious sedation and it would have been a big freaking deal, with pediatric anesthesia and Child Life and a professional parental hand-holder involved. Instead, I just told the patient to ‘man up’ and performed some visualization techniques and breathing exercises, which did the trick.” It was only after he completed the procedure and was writing his consult note that Cortas found the encounter to be unusual.  “I had to look it up, but I kinda remembered from my peds clerkship that they taught us neonates can’t walk. Something seemed fishy.”

Faced with these and thousands of similar incidents, pressure began mounting on the AAP to resolve the discrepancies. Eventually, the august body cracked.  “I can’t keep up the charade any longer,” said Dr Anne Gopal, Chairwoman for Public Policy at the Academy. “There’s only so many pediatric emphysema cases and cirrhotic livers that you can brush under the rug.”

As to the motivation behind the fraudulent decades-long insistence that “children aren’t just little adults,” many commentators pointed to a money trail. “Think about it,” said one anonymous source. “All those donations to children’s hospitals. Residency programs training thousands of physicians annually. An entire industry making toys to attach to the ends of stethoscopes. It was a total gravy train. But not any more.”

Read more on http://www.gomerblog.com/2014/01/children-really-are-little-adults/

#FullArticles, #Pediatrics little adults Full Articles, Pediatrics
Little Adults

The twins were very nervous when we were out on the water in our little boat. From the dock, their mother was yelling at them, “Just be brave and pose.” Finally, they realized that they would have only each other for support, and so they held hands and stuck together until the shoot was over.

(Russian Photographer Anna Skladmann describes the behind-the-scenes of this beautiful photo, from her book “Little Adults”)

Having a twin sister myself, almost nothing moves me more than seeing other sets of twins. And the sight of these plaintive, slightly panicked blonde girls holding on to each other pretty much sums up my own childhood - though, unlike this pair, we were born neither Russian nor, unfortunately, particularly wealthy.