little shop of horrors*

3

Some of these cosplays were amazing!!!!
I’ve never seen a Seymour and Audrey cosplay before!!!
I didn’t take a lot of pictures but these people really stood out. There was another Bill-person I saw but this woman was my favorite!
And that Rose shield omg and Pearl was perfect and I hope you all have a wonderful Megacon!!

I think being born with a passion for musicals whilst being given no ability to execute them yourself in any creative form whatsoever is a worser fate than mouth herpes.

10

screw writing “strong” women

Getting into musicals is so weird cos you start out with something relatively normal like Wizard of Oz or something from Disney and you’re like “ok” and then you move on to ones about newspaper boy strikes or the founding fathers and you’re like “…ok” and the next thing you know you’re watching a musical about an alien man eating plant that may or may not represent Satan’s temptations and you’re like “…how the fuck did I get here”

Words/phrases you should never say to a musical theater kid (unless you want to see them get lit af)

“Hello.”

“What’s your name?” 

(Bonus: easy way to find out whether they’re a Les Mis person or a Hamilton person)

“How many minutes are there in a year?”

“Life’s a bitch.”

“Downtown.”

“I’m changing my major.”

“Rent is too damn high.”

“Satisfied.”

“All I ask.”

“Popular.”

“Sugar, butter, flour.”

“For good.”

I had a very interesting discussion about theater and film the other day. My parents and I were talking about Little Shop of Horrors and, specifically, about the ending of the musical versus the ending of the (1986) movie. In the musical, the story ends with the main characters getting eaten by the plant and everybody dying. The movie was originally going to end the same way, but audience reactions were so negative that they were forced to shoot a happy ending where the plant is destroyed and the main characters survive. Frank Oz, who directed the movie, later said something I think is very interesting:

I learned a lesson: in a stage play, you kill the leads and they come out for a bow — in a movie, they don’t come out for a bow, they’re dead. They’re gone and so the audience lost the people they loved, as opposed to the theater audience where they knew the two people who played Audrey and Seymour were still alive. They loved those people, and they hated us for it.

That’s a real gem of a thought in and of itself, a really interesting consequence of the fact that theater is alive in a way that film isn’t. A stage play always ends with a tangible reminder that it’s all just fiction, just a performance, and this serves to gently return the audience to the real world. Movies don’t have that, which really changes the way you’re affected by the story’s conclusion. Neat!

But here’s what’s really cool: I asked my dad (who is a dramaturge) what he had to say about it, and he pointed out that there is actually an equivalent technique in film: the blooper reel. When a movie plays bloopers while the credits are rolling, it’s accomplishing the exact same thing: it reminds you that the characters are actually just played by actors, who are alive and well and probably having a lot of fun, even if the fictional characters suffered. How cool is that!?

Now I’m really fascinated by the possibility of using bloopers to lessen the impact of a tragic ending in a tragicomedy…