little method

“Hello again Lance.”

“Oh hey Lotor, came back for more?”

“Oh yes, I did.”


OMG YOU GUYS! I can’t believe my last piece has almost 900 notes! Thanks so much! And since it went so well I’m inspired to continue this little story! Lance is still captured on a Galra ship. It’s not looking very good. But hey he still has his bad ass sass! Anyway, I didn’t really want to put Lotor in this one because I kind of wanted to leave it to your guys imagination. But to me I hope he’s a little swave and methodical, basically kind of the complete opposite of how he was in the original lol I do hope he does end up with that helmet though because come on, it’s a great helmet. 

Also if anyone wants to (*cough*) write a fan fiction based on my work (*cough*) and um send it to me to read (I can’t write fan fiction for shit) that’d be great! Thanks again you guys! Enjoy! 

I’ve got a post-Inquisition scene in my head and I wish I had any artistic talent because dang, it would look good as a picture. I could probably scribble a thumbnail, but that’s as far as it would get on my end.

Pendulum practice

Guys! I just thought of a good way to practice using a pendulum on your own! Okay, so a lot of people on the internet that I’ve seen have suggested just asking the pendulum questions about yourself/questions you already know the answer to, but I’m a little iffy on this method because I think it’s super easy for it to be biased. Even if you’re not intentionally giving yourself the right answers, the fact that you already know what the answers are could influence your subconscious-thus, causing your arm muscles to move even a little bit towards the direction you’re expecting/hoping for through some kind of placebo effect.
This method, however, is one that you can do by yourself without knowing the answers while still getting instant confirmation of your results (as opposed to answering questions from anons or something else). Btw just so everyone knows, I haven’t actually tested these methods and I’m typing it now so that I can get it out while it’s still fresh in my mind. Anyway, let’s begin!

What you’ll need:
•A single sheet of paper
•Some sort of large-ish container
•A writing utensil
•Scissors (optional, but recommended)

Prep:
Divide your paper in half, and draw two equal grids on each of the halves. The number of squares you put in the grids is up to you. After doing this, write yes’s in each square of one of the grids and no’s in each square of the other. Then you cut (or rip, if you don’t have scissors) the squares apart, fold each paper scrap so that you can’t see if it says yes or no, and put them into your container and give them a good shake or two.

How to use:
•Method 1: Take 1-5 scraps of paper out from your container at a time, lay them out so that you can’t see what they say, and one by one ask your pendulum whether each scrap says yes or no, checking your accuracy as you go.

•Method 2: Take 2-10 scraps of paper out at a time, lay them out so that you can’t see what they say, and ask your pendulum how many yes’s or no’s you’ve drawn, working your way up from two to ten, checking your accuracy once you get an answer saying which number is correct.

•Alternative methods:
For method one: If you think your pendulum has a tendency to give one answer the majority of the time even if it isn’t correct, maybe instead of writing 50% yes’s and 50% no’s, make 75% of the squares the answer your pendulum gives least often so that you can practice it giving its ‘usual’ answer only when it is correct.
If you want to test more than just yes or no answers to increase accuracy, make squares for all the answers you know your pendulum to give (such as “maybe”, “I don’t know”, etc.)
For method one or two (it’d be easier for method one), instead of writing equal parts yes’s and no’s, you could write equal yes or no questions about yourself and ask instead of whether the square says yes or no, whether the answer to the question on the sheet is yes or no. Idk, just a thought.

If anyone can think of any other ideas, please feel free to add on to this! Also, please credit me if you reference this post anywhere else.

I posted this ages ago after @alluringhemlock asked for advice on studying biology and now it is back with a snazzy new header! So here’s what I came up with. I’m going to give some things which work well for me and some general tips that apply to everyone!

  • Be constantly testing yourself.

When you’re reading a textbook or going over your notes, test yourself. When you reach an important bit of terminology, test yourself to make sure you know what it means. If a process is referenced but not explained, see if you can go over it in your head without looking it up. Anything, you don’t understand either look up straight away or make a note to revise it later.

  • See what you already know

This is a little like the previous method but instead of testing yourself as you go along, do it before you revise. Choose a topic you’re going to go over and just see how much you can do before you look over it. This can be really helpful for prioritising sections of your work and can boost your confidence before you start revising! Just be careful that you don’t neglect certain areas because you knew it fairly well before - there is always room for improvement.

  • Snowball method

Start simple and build your way up. For example, when revising kidneys I might first learn to label a diagram of the nephron. Next, I learn the functions of each different part. After that, learn how each different part works to carry out these functions. I find this method really useful for when I feel like there is far too much for me to learn. Start out with the basics and move up in manageable steps. You’ll get there.

  • Go back over your notes

This is better explained here but basically; go over your notes. I like to go over my notes in the evening on the day of the lessons and then again at the end of the week. It doesn’t have to take that much time but it will really help your retention.

  • Learn the terminology

The mark schemes for exam papers, at least in the UK, are specific. If you don’t use the right words, you won’t get the marks. So learn them. Make flashcards, write out long lists, use them wherever you can just make sure you know them!

  • Past papers

Past papers, past papers, past papers. I find that one of the ways I learn best is from making mistakes. So do those papers, make those mistakes and learn from them. Past papers are also really useful for figuring out the way you should be writing, how much you should be writing, and the types of words you should be using.

  • Be in all the lessons!

I can’t stress how important this one is! For me personally I find that if I missed a history lesson for whatever reason, it wouldn’t be too difficult to catch up. This is because, at my level of study, history is mostly just learning facts. Biology, and other sciences, require a full understanding of the subject. If you don’t have that, you won’t do as well, and it’s so much harder to get a good understanding when you’re copying someone’s notes rather than listening to the teacher explain it.

Study Buddy

*a poppet used to promote concentration and motivation to get what needs to be done

Supplies

A yellow, orange, or white poppet/doll pattern, with stuffing (yellow if the buddy will be used for schooling. learning, etc. Orange if the buddy is used for creative activities such as drawing, writing, creating, etc. White if you have neither of the other colors, or plan to use the buddy for other purposes)

Celery Seed: Aids in concentration

Fern: Mental clarity

Jasmine: Promotes new and innovative ideas

Any other herbs/stones that pertain to what you want the buddy to accomplish

Needle and thread

A piece of rose quartz *optional

Steps

1. Construct your poppet. Sew it into a doll/human shape and add stuffing. Leave a small section open and make sure to leave room for your ingredients.

2. Add your herbs and whatever ingredients you decided to include. (Note: Leave out the rose quartz, save this for later).

3. Charge the little guy with the method of your choosing. After it’s fully charged, add in the rose quartz (this is what I call the ‘heart’ of the poppet, to make it come alive) and sew up the opening.

4. Leave your poppet where you study, draw, write, etc. Every now and then give it a good cleanse and recharge.

     [Headcanon!! In lieu with her ‘ contracts ’ as they deal with the mind and can warp perceptions to the extent of brainwashing, Veronica has one trick she holds in reserve. It isn’t widely used as most everyone has been easy to deal with regardless of how strict her control has had to be. However, should she choose to do so, she can actually change the way someone views her as well. In others’ eyes they might see a young princess, but to someone under the strictest contract, they could see her as someone else. A mother, father, beloved, sibling, or even child. She holds little qualms against this method. These people are the most like dolls to her under a completely brainwashed state. And it’s no concern to others who might hear these individuals refer to Veronica as how they see her. It’s simple enough to work in a new mindset that it’s perfectly normal.

     These are extremely rare conditions of her mind control and don’t happen often. It’s not done for fun or as an easy route but rather in cases where the individual(s) serve problem otherwise. However if you’d like to do a thread like this, feel free to come talk to me about it!]

flickr

Luigi Loir - Manège, Place du Delta by Gandalf
Via Flickr:
Luigi Loir (Gorriiz, December 22, 1845 - Paris, February 9, 1916) first started training formally in art in 1853 at the Beaux-Art Academy of Parma and finished his studies in 1865. He made his debut in the Salon of Paris with a view of Villiers-sur-Seine, that received very high praise. A little methodical perhaps, Loir concentrated exclusively on painting views of Paris, at the time the centre of the world. In these works, Loir caught and expressed the many faces of the city of lights, at different times of the day. His craftsmanship and attention to detail led to his election as the official painter of the Boulevards of Paris. This boosted his career and his reputation even further. In 1879 he was awarded the Bronze medal from as Exposant Fidele des Artistes Francais in Paris.

[Trinity House Art, London - Oil on canvas, 33.02 x 46.36 cm]

I am now going to be forever and ever a hundred times more the advocate of “have you seen a doctor / professional first?” when people ask about any sort of medical issues in conjunction with witchcraft.

@the44th dear lORD I hope you’re joking ajdjajjdjdj

I only read a little bit of the methods of rationality and it was? Pretty good I guess? Very odd. But it was SUPER fucking pretentious from what I remember like dear lord

anonymous asked:

So, you gonna draw anymore of the Danny Gomez Demons/Physical Hallucinations/Physical Manifestations of Corporeal entities derived from Hallucinatory substances? At the least, I want to know what "99" looks like. Is it a pill? A blunt? A needle? Some sort of... scented bath salt candle thing?

It’s a mysterious man-made substance of which it’s origin is not completely known. No one knows if it was made by some lone kook in a Breaking Bad-style meth lab or by a team of 50 scientists in a government bunker.

It comes in the form of semi-firm organic chunks/slivers that are white/pale lavender in color. If enough pressure is applied by your finger, they kinda crumble and splinter into smaller little bits. The preferred method of intake is to roll them up like weed and smoke UP.  Though one can crush them and mix them into food (however the taste in this manner is said to be heavily worsened). 

Only one small batch was ever produced (before the presumed source was killed or died), meaning there is only a tiny and finite amount of 99 in existence, making it nearly priceless. 

Studying biology!

A couple of weeks ago @alluringhemlock asked for advice on studying biology so here’s what I came up with! I’m going to give some things which work well for me and some general tips that apply to everyone! 

  •  Be constantly testing yourself.

When you’re reading a textbook or going over your notes, test yourself. When you reach an important bit of terminology, test yourself to make sure you know what it means. If a process is referenced but not explained, see if you can go over it in your head without looking it up. Anything, you don’t understand either look up straight away or make a note to revise it later. 

  • See what you already know

This is a little like the previous method but instead of testing yourself as you go along, do it before you revise. Choose a topic you’re going to go over and just see how much you can do before you look over it. This can be really helpful for prioritising sections of your work and can boost your confidence before you start revising! Just be careful that you don’t neglect certain areas because you knew it fairly well before - there is always room for improvement.

  • Snowball method

Start simple and build your way up. For example, when revising kidneys I might first learn to label a diagram of the nephron. Next, I learn the functions of each different part. After that, learn how each different part works to carry out these functions. I find this method really useful for when I feel like there is far too much for me to learn. Start out with the basics and move up in manageable steps. You’ll get there.

  • Go back over your notes

This is better explained here but basically; go over your notes. I like to go over my notes in the evening on the day of the lessons and then again at the end of the week. It doesn’t have to take that much time but it will really help your retention.

  • Learn the terminology

The mark schemes for exam papers, at least in the UK, are specific. If you don’t use the right words, you won’t get the marks. So learn them. Make flashcards, write out long lists, use them wherever you can just make sure you know them!

  • Past papers 

Past papers, past papers, past papers. I find that one of the ways I learn best is from making mistakes. So do those papers, make those mistakes and learn from them. Past papers are also really useful for figuring out the way you should be writing, how much you should be writing, and the types of words you should be using.

  • Be in all the lessons!

I can’t stress how important this one is! For me personally I find that if I missed a history lesson for whatever reason, it wouldn’t be too difficult to catch up. This is because, at my level of study, history is mostly just learning facts. Biology, and other sciences, require a full understanding of the subject. If you don’t have that, you won’t do as well, and it’s so much harder to get a good understanding when you’re copying someone’s notes rather than listening to the teacher explain it.