little bookshop of horrors

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(The following excerpt is from Carl Levinger’s interviews in She-wolf Chronicles)

Behind the Scenes: Episodes You’ll Never See

WR: The one that I recall is they zap back into the Old West, and it turns out to be the result of some diabolical scientific experiment by Triax Multiproducts International, which is being run by Dr. Pretorius from “Bride of the Wolfman,” and he says, “I was contacted by Triax in their outreach program,” and Ian says, “But you’re a fictional character.”

“They have a very broad definition of an outreach program.”

LG: We had these land sharks; they had these car sales men who were shark people, sharks that had evolved into human beings.

WR: (another episode) Santa Claus disappears, and these elves come to Ian and Randi, these little short guys, and say, “We’re elves.” “Yeah, right.” “Santa’s disappeared…” It was a Christmas episode. Santa was stressed out, Santa wanted a break. It wasn’t as silly as it sounds now, talking about it. 

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(The following excerpt is from Carl Levinger’s interviews in She-wolf Chronicles)

WR: We’re very passionate about this. It’s the only time we’ve been let loose on a show. I honestly remember our third script, “Little Bookshop of Horrors,” with a second act break where our heroine turns herself into Anna Karenina and throwing herself under a train, later re-written to be a bus, and Ian morphing through various characters from literature in the end. We just sent it in and waited for the bombs to fall. When Universal liked it, I had this flash and said, “My God, we can get away with anything at this point. We have to be self-censoring,” because it’s always the executive producer who says, “No, you can’t do that.” That lasted for about half a script, and I thought, “You know, there’s no one telling us what to do. We can do whatever the hell we want to!” And we die.
LG: We still use “Little Bookshop of Horrors” as an audition scsript, just to show people how bizarre we can get. “She-Wolf of London” is still our favorite work. I could have written that show for five years.