lit mag

WHEN TWO ARTISTS FALL IN LOVE

i.
We go out to dinner
and we don’t look at each other.
We spend the whole night
scratching through napkins,
staining our hands dirty with ink.
I write your eyes into the stars
and you write my name into
a front-page headline:
BOY FALLS IN LOVE WITH A PAINTING.
IT DOES NOT END PRETTY.

ii.
I write you into something burning
and I am the heat of the sun,
a burning body that
you want to live in.
I turn you into poetry
until you become
the secondhand smoke
stuck in my hair
and I find myself pulling
poems from the shower drain.

iii.
We stare at each other
from across the room
and I spend the night
turning you into a metaphor.
It only takes three nights
before I realize you are
just words written
on the palm of my hand,
rubbed away every time
I hold onto something else
too tightly.

vi.
The next three weeks are spent
writing poetry about your lips
as you paint the stars
into my crooked spine.
After a while, I grow tired of the way
you look at me like I’m a masterpiece
but are too afraid to touch my body.

v.
I spend the night tracing
the tattoo on your chest
with my fingertips,
and I begin to miss the boys
with the cruel hands
and brutal bodies.
Finally, my hands rewrite
your fear into an apology:
I have to go.

—  “When Two Artists Fall in Love” by Lindsey Hobart published in The Dinner Table Review

Let me tell you some things about the literary magazine racket, as someone who has been published quite a few times and made some okay money:

1. Literary mags always publish late. Whatever date your editor tells you, add a lag period of two weeks to a month.
2. Pay always comes late. Often in the form of an oddly personal check, floated your way so long after publication you can’t even recall what it’s for.
3. Sometimes literary magazines forget to pay, mail the check to the wrong place, or send payment to an incorrect Paypal address. There is no harm in hounding the editor about it.
4. ¼ of the pieces you get accepted will never actually go live, because the magazine folds, loses an editor, becomes insolvent, or is disorganized.
5. 1/10 of the magazines you are published in will cease to exist within the same year as your acceptance
6. Sometimes you will have work accepted, but won’t be paid, won’t be given a contract, will be asked to make nonsensical edits, and will later see the piece not in the place you submitted it to, but another affiliated magazine in a different genre.
7. These things will all happen to you at once if you ever submit stories to Efiction or any of its affiliates. Seriously they accepted 3 stories of mine in 3 different mags, and only one of those mags lasted long enough to publish a subsequent issue with my work in it, and despite years of emails, I never got paid. Doug Lance what the heck

Wondering who we are exactly?
________
Persephone’s Daughters is a lit magazine founded by Meggie Royer, and staffed with Tumblr writers Lora Mathis, Caitlyn Siehl, Donna-Marie Riley, Kristina Haynes, and Azra Tabassum, and Elizabeth Roten, that is aimed at empowering abused and denigrated women. This is one of the only magazines of its kind, and we have staff members who are trans, who are former sex workers, who have been through trauma of all kinds, who have been featured in print, on TV, on the radio, and more.

If you submit to us, you’ll have the chance to be read by wonderfully talented writers, and possibly get a shot at empowering women who have suffered in a lit magazine whose audience comes from all over the world.

Submissions cap at 300, and we have 230 right now, so submit soon!

ONLY 2 WEEKS LEFT TO SUBMIT!

Hello writers and artists on Tumblr! My name is Sebastian and I am beginning this new project that has been a long time in the making.  I am beginning to curate a literary/art magazine by teenagers, for teenagers.  This work will only be by kids 13-18, because I feel like those are the people who have some of the best work to share and they are never given an outlet to share it.  That is why I am creating this magazine, because I want more adolescent voices to be heard. If you are interested in submitting writing (essays, poems, short stories, flash fiction, etc.) or visual art (photography, graphic design, drawing, painting, etc.) then feel free to head over to the Submission Guidelines. Thank you so much and have a wonderful day! 

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Read The Yeah Write Review for FREE!

Hey guys! Did you know that about a year ago, we had a literary magazine for a few seasons? Each issue contains writing advice articles by English majors, published authors, MFA students, etc., as well as short stories, nonfiction pieces, poetry, and beautiful photography.

I had to put it on indefinite hiatus because it was too time consuming, but I’m still really proud of the 3 issues we created! The copies used to be paid but since it’s been a year I thought ah, what the hell, I’ll put them right on Yeah Write so people can read them for free :)

Go to yeahwriters.tumblr.com/ywreview and click on each issue to open up in a beautiful viewer (make sure you don’t just click the arrow that shows up because then it just displays really tiny in the page haha). And all of the links within the mag are live!

I hope you’ll check them out out!

kickstarter.com
Ichor - Issue One: Diversity - Young Adult lit magazine
Ichor is a print-only lit magazine for Young Adult readers and writers, featuring fiction, non-fiction, interviews, book recs, and art.

What is Ichor Magazine?

Hi there! We’re Jensine Jones and Candice Sooknarine, the co-founders of Ichor Magazine, a brand new Young Adult lit mag! Jensine is from Canada and Candice from the UK – we met while studying for our Masters degree in Publishing four years ago. We’ve since spent many late nights and early mornings (thanks, time zones!) deep in discussion about our love for YA lit, diversity, and representation. It was these conversations that first sparked the idea that would, over the next eight months, become Ichor Magazine.

We both have a deep love for YA literature – we really think it is often willing to tackle subjects that adult fiction won’t, and does so in really interesting and innovative ways. Let’s be real, there’s a reason that there’s always a ton of YA lit on the ALA’s annual list of most banned and challenged books, and it sure ain’t cause YA is afraid to challenge convention. Still, mainstream YA publishing can’t seem to quite get over the hetero white status quo, which is where the conversation about Ichor really began.

What would become Ichor started in a text chat about what we think is missing from mainstream YA, and what we would create if we had the chance (and funds… which is where you come in). We wanted more diversity and representation. We wanted a platform for authors who, for various reasons, would get rejected out of hand by large publishing houses and the white male editorial slant they represent. We wanted to do something new, something different, something beautiful.

So, in short, what is Ichor?

Ichor is a new literary magazine dedicated to Young Adult fiction, non-fiction and art, and aimed at readers 16+*.

Our main goal is to find the very best new YA works, bundle them with interesting thinkpieces and interviews, and deliver them in a high quality, print-only magazine. We’re keen on diversity – from race to gender to sexuality to physical and mental disabilities – which is why we have made it the central theme of Issue One. We believe that the Young Adult genre is probably the most diverse and inclusive, both online and in print, and we want to give that innovativeness a new way to get to readers.

This extends to our contributors, too. All submissions to Ichor are judged blind, meaning that we are selecting content for Issue One based on quality alone. Age, race, gender, education-level – none of that factors. In fact, we won’t even know any of that info about our contributors until after our final selections have been made! We also believe wholeheartedly in PAYING writers and artists, which is why every contributor will be paid. This is part of the reason why we decided to take Ichor to Kickstarter – on our own, we wouldn’t be able to pay contributors, which just doesn’t work for us. We’re not interested in a magazine that doesn’t pay the people who are so important to creating it. Reaching our funding goal will not only mean that we can go to print, but also that we’ll be able to pay each and every contributor!

Speaking of printing, we’re also really into beautiful print magazines that are not only a good read but a pleasure to hold and own, which is why we want to make sure we can get you folks the nicest quality print of the mag that we can! (think beautiful, velvety smooth cover and lovely thick pages). With gorgeous cover art and our adorable issue one exclusive sticker and badge designs, we think we’re off to a pretty good start!

Learn more and back our kickstarter here!

Guidelines for Burroughskowski-Hemingway Monthly: A Hypermasculine Lit Mag

The following was performed and recorded live at Hopleaf by Cassandra, a comedy collective that seamlessly weaves outrageous characters, storytelling, live lit, and music into one hilarious live show.

DUDE 1: Hey there my man. If you’ve wandered on over to this little web portal, you must be interested in submitting a dark, rugged piece of prose to our humble little magazine, Burroughskowski-Hemingway Monthly.

 DUDE 2: But before you start banging on that typerwriter you keep in your grandma’s kitchen, you oughta know a few things.

 DUDE 3: We have some very specific guidelines for dudes and broads who want to submit their shit to our magazine

 DUDE 2: Yeah. And before you submit, you better make sure you know how we like to party around here.

 DUDE 1: We’re not your typical namby-pamby pussy-wussy realist lit mag.

 DUDE 2: This ain’t no Ploughshares or McSweeny’s dude.

 DUDE 1: We are a PULP FUSION ALT WORD ZINE.

 DUDE 3: We don’t believe in labels, genres, adjectives, clauses, human motivations, or cause and effect relationships.

 DUDE 2: We want your ass to dazzle us. Tear our fucking nuts off with your narrative-shattering grimy slimy gritty roadkill trash garbage sewage art.

 DUDE 1: We don’t like Victorian lady tea and crumpets stories, okay.

 DUDE 3: we’re POST POSTMODERN OKAY WE’RE EDGY

 DUDE 2: …also if you can work in some noirish elements and have the main character bang a hooker that dies before the story is out, that would be cool too.

 DUDE 3: NO WORD LIMITS JUST WRITE FOREVER DON’T EAT AND DEFINITELY DON’T SHOWER. NO COMIC SANS. NO GRAMMAR.

 DUDE 1: Narrative arcs and multi-dimensional characters are for nerd-ass squares, okay, make all your characters fucking talking bricks with bad attitudes, alright.

 DUDE 2: No growing no learning no feelings.

 DUDE 1: Also, We’re a non-paying market, the fuck you expect.

 DUDE 3: YOUR PAYMENT IS EXPOSURE. WE WILL EXPOSE THIS AWFUL EARTH TO YOUR DAMN DIRTY PROSE. ALSO WE WILL EXPOSE OURSELVES TO YOU AND/OR YOUR GIRLFRIEND

 DUDE 2: Also, don’t write anything that will make us feel guilty about being MEN’S MEN, okay? Don’t talk about gross things like feelings or periods or historical contexts of oppression that have led to a general over-valuing of writing that is perceived to be individualistic and aggressive in an anti-social, hyper-masculinized way…

 DUDE 1: ….uh

 DUDE 3: OUR WRITERS ARE MEN. AND BROADS WHO LIKE FUCKING MEN. WITH BALLS. OKAY!

 DUDE 1: We accept all types of work and writers as long as it’s just FILTHY with grit.

 DUDE 3: HERE’S A PROCESS TIP! WRITE AT THE BAR WHILE GIVING OFF AN AIR OF BROODING MYSTERY AND NINE DOLLAR GROCERY STORE WHISKEY THAT IS NOT AT ALL DISCONCERTING TO BE SITTING NEXT TO!

 DUDE 2: OH HELL YEAH

 DUDE 1: Things we like in a story:

 DUDE 3: BITCHES WITH LEGS. BROWN BOOZE. CIGARETTES. CIGARETTE SMOKE. GUN SMOKE. GUNS. MURDER. INTRIGUE. BULL RIDING. MEN FIGHTING AS THEIR ONLY WAY OF SHOWING HUMAN AFFECTION. NOT USING QUOTATION MARKS FOR DIALOGUE

 DUDE 1: Things we fucking hate include:

 DUDE 2: Women talking to other women about something other than a man, black characters that don’t use some weird affectation of jive talk, people that don’t wear fedoras, blind characters who aren’t magical and wise, lesbian characters that don’t become straight when they meet our rugged, square jawed protagonist

 DUDE 3: AND TINY DOGS THAT DON’T MOTHERFUCKING HUNT

 DUDE 2: DON’T WRITE ABOUT THAT SHIT

 DUDE 3: Don’t you dare write about that shit.

 DUDE 1: Send us your werewolf police detective screenplays. Send us your cowboy that fucks three-pussied aliens stories. Send us your haikus about chasing beaver in Logan Square.

 DUDE 3: SEND US YOUR SHIT.

 DUDE 1: If you think your work meets these guidelines, just scrawl it on the back of a postcard with a buffalo on the front of it and drop it into the postbox

 DUDE 2: We use a PO box because we don’t want THE MAN to track us down, MAN

 DUDE 1: Also our moms got tired of piles and piles of short stories about wrestling zombie Teddy Rosevelt ending up on our doorsteps and shit.

 DUDE 2: Yeah.

 DUDE 3: OH HELL YEAH

 DUDE 1: Anyway, thanks for checkin out this dank dark corner of the web, man. And thanks for reading Burroughskowski-Hemingway Monthly. Party on…

 DUDE 3: Party the FUCK on!

End

Submissions for our Spring 2016 Issue are now open! 

Road Maps & Life Rafts is looking for poetry, short fiction, creative non-fiction, photography, and other visual art that is representative of travel and journeying, whether that journey is from physical place to place, or of emotional and social growth. 

If you don’t want to submit but would love to subscribe, you can do so here!

We look forward to reviewing your work!

huffingtonpost.com
Writing Deadline Dos and Don'ts

It happens to every writer sooner or later. You’re planning on submitting work to a literary journal, entering a contest, or completing edits for your publisher; and of course, there’s a deadline. You sincerely intended to complete your writing on time, but things got in the way: work, running errands, catching up on all six seasons of that show everyone’s talking about. Before you know it, the due date you had plenty of time to meet is now pressing down on you; it’s crunch time.

Don’t panic! Here’s what you should – and shouldn’t – do to meet your deadline without losing your mind.

Read The Yeah Write Review for FREE!

Hey guys! Did you know that about a year ago, we had a literary magazine for a few seasons? I had to  put it on indefinite hiatus because it was too time consuming, but I’m still really proud of the 3 issues we created!

It used to be a paid magazine, but I was paying more for the monthly hosting on the ecommerce site than we were earning from sales, so I thought aw, what the hell, I’ll just put them right up on Yeah Write for free!

The image above shows you how to read them right on Yeah Write–click “Pages” in our menu, then click the last topic, The Yeah Write Review (or just go here). When you click on each issue they open up in a beautiful viewer (make sure you don’t just click the arrow that shows up because then it just displays really tiny in the page haha). And all of the links within the mag are live!

I hope you’ll check them out out!

Introducing ASH TREE: an alt lit literary journal

Greetings, tumblr!

To introduce ourselves: we are a brand new online literary journal called Ash Tree, and we want your submissions! Our focuses are alt lit and internet poetry, and we are interested in incorporating spoken word, glitch art, image macros, and anything else new and exciting and alternative that you can think of! Submissions for our first issue open TONIGHT (OCTOBER 15) and close NOVEMBER 30. Guidelines for submission can be found here

If you have any questions, feel free to hit up our ask box or our twitter.

We’re very excited to see what kind of amazing writing the tumblr community has to offer! 

Lana


says her pussy tastes like Pepsi-Cola.

Years of salt and strain have feathered mine

into a canyon bearing blood.

Once a week, he feeds me through the door,

porterhouse steak sliced sideways,

glass of milk sweating beads of ice.

I sleep wound in an American flag,

mountains outside the crack of window

being embalmed in moonlight.

If I was not born to die,

I was born for this.

To give whatever he demands,

be it a little toe or my whole body,

until the bedsprings break

and my final spells have been cast.



About: Meggie Royer is a writer and photographer from the Midwest who is currently majoring in Psychology at Macalester College. Her poems have previously appeared in Words Dance Magazine, Winter Tangerine Review, Electric Cereal, and more. In March 2013 she won a National Gold Medal for her poetry collection and a National Silver Medal for her writing portfolio in the 2013 National Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. Her work can be found at writingsforwinter.tumblr.com.


Artwork

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SMILE BABY: A zine about how we make space for ourselves when we are given none to begin with.

NOW ACCEPTING SUBMISSIONS FOR PUBLICATION!

WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FOR 

SMILE BABY is an internet zine open to submissions for our first publication. 

We are currently accepting all work of or relating to how gender affects the ways in which young people navigate and reclaim public spaces. 

This expression can come in the form of visual or written work, including but not limited to: collage// poetry// photo projects// essays,

Our first theme is: OUR VOICES. We want to hear about the ways you understand your own experiences in public. 

WHO WE’LL PUBLISH

SMILE BABY is currently only accepting submissions from those who can speak from the “I” perspective when discussion the experiences of young women and gender nonconforming youth. 

If you self identify as any of the above and would like to submit- please, be our guest! 

HOW TO SUBMIT 

Submission is easy. Simply email SMILEBABYMAG@GMAIL.COM with an attachment to the piece you wish to publish and a small summary of the work you are submitting. 

The subject of the email should read: “SMILE BABY Zine Submission- Title of Work*” 

*please replace “title of work” with the working title of the piece you have submitted. 

Include: your name as you wish it to appear in the zine, the best way to contact you, and any other information you think we may need about the piece. 

Thank you!- Jones