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Lisa Lawrence’s Archetypes and Symbols List

Archetypes and Symbols

SITUATION ARCHETYPES

1. The Quest – This motif describes the search for someone or some talisman which, when found and brought back, will restore fertility to a wasted land, the desolation of which is mirrored by a leader’s illness and disability.

2. The Task – This refers to a possibly superhuman feat that must be accomplished in order to fulfill the ultimate goal.

3. The Journey – The journey sends the hero in search for some truth of information necessary to restore fertility, justice, and/or harmony to the kingdom. The journey includes the series of trials and tribulations the hero faces along the way. Usually the hero descends into a real or psychological hell and is forced to discover the blackest truths, quite often concerning his faults. Once the hero is at this lowest level, he must accept personal responsibility to return to the world of the living.

4. The Initiation – This situation refers to a moment, usually psychological, in which an individual comes into maturity. He or she gains a new awareness into the nature of circumstances and problems and understands his or her responsibility for trying to resolve the dilemma. Typically, a hero receives a calling, a message or signal that he or she must make sacrifices and become responsible for getting involved in the problem. Often a hero will deny and question the calling and ultimately, in the initiation, will accept responsibility.

5. The Ritual – Not to be confused with the initiation, the ritual refers to an organized ceremony that involves honored members of a given community and an Initiate. This situation officially brings the young man or woman into the realm of the community’s adult world.

6. The Fall – Not to be confused with the awareness in the initiation, this archetype describes a descent in action from a higher to a lower state of being, an experience which might involve defilement, moral imperfection, and/or loss of innocence. This fall is often accompanied by expulsion from a kind of paradise as penalty for disobedience and/or moral transgression.

7. Death and Rebirth – The most common of all situational archetypes, this motif grows out of the parallel between the cycle of nature and the cycle of life. It refers to those situations in which someone or something, concrete and/or metaphysical dies, yet is accompanied by some sign of birth or rebirth.

8. Nature vs. Mechanistic World – Expressed in its simplest form, this refers to situations which suggest that nature is good whereas the forces of technology are bad.

9. Battle Between Good and Evil – These situations pit obvious forces which represent good and evil against one another; typically, good ultimately triumphs over evil despite great odds.

10. The Unhealable Wound – This wound, physical or psychological, cannot be healed fully. This would also indicate a loss of innocence or purity. Often the wounds’ pain drives the sufferer to desperate measures of madness.

11. The Magic Weapon – Sometimes connected with the task, this refers to a skilled individual hero’s ability to use a piece of technology in order to combat evil, continue a journey, or to prove his or her identity as a chosen individual.

12. Father-Son Conflict – Tension often results from separation during childhood or from an external source when the individuals meet as men and where the mentor often has a higher place in the affections of the hero than the natural parent. Sometimes the conflict is resolved in atonement.

13. Innate Wisdom vs. Educated Stupidity – Some characters exhibit wisdom and understanding intuitively as opposed to those supposedly in charge.

SYMBOLIC ARCHETYPES

1. Light vs. Darkness – Light usually suggests hope, renewal, OR intellectual illumination; darkness implies the unknown, ignorance, or despair.

2. Water vs. Desert – Because water is necessary to life and growth, it commonly appears as a birth or rebirth symbol. Water is used in baptism services, which solemnizes spiritual births. Similarly, the appearance of rain in a work of literature can suggest a character’s spiritual birth.

3. Heaven vs. Hell – Humanity has traditionally associated parts of the universe not accessible to it with the dwelling places of the primordial forces that govern its world. The skies and mountaintops house its gods; the bowels of the earth contain the diabolic forces that inhabit its universe.

4. Haven vs. Wilderness – Places of safety contrast sharply against the dangerous wilderness. Heroes are often sheltered for a time to regain health and resources.

5. Supernatural Intervention – The gods intervene on the side of the hero or sometimes against him.

6. Fire vs. Ice – Fire represents knowledge, light, life, and rebirth while ice like desert represents ignorance, darkness, sterility, and death.

7. Colors

A. Black (darkness) – chaos, mystery, the unknown, before existence, death, the unconscious, evil

B. Red – blood, sacrifice; violent passion, disorder, sunrise, birth, fire, emotion, wounds, death, sentiment, mother, Mars, the note C, anger, excitement, heat, physical stimulation

C. Green – hope, growth, envy, Earth, fertility, sensation, vegetation, death, water, nature, sympathy, adaptability, growth, Jupiter and Venus, the note G, envy

D. White (light) – purity, peace, innocence, goodness, Spirit, morality, creative force, the direction East, spiritual thought

E. Orange – fire, pride, ambition, egoism, Venus, the note D

F. Blue – clear sky, the day, the sea, height, depth, heaven, religious feeling, devotion, innocence, truth, spirituality, Jupiter, the note F, physical soothing and cooling

G. Violet – water, nostalgia, memory, advanced spirituality, Neptune, the note B

H. Gold – Majesty, sun, wealth, corn (life dependency), truth

I. Silver – Moon, wealth

8. Numbers:

A. Three – the Trinity (Father, Son, Holy Ghost); Mind, Body, Spirit, Birth, Life, Death

B. Four – Mankind (four limbs), four elements, four seasons

C. Six – devil, evil

D. Seven – Divinity (3) + Mankind (4) = relationship between man and God, seven deadly sins, seven days of week, seven days to create the world, seven stages of civilization, seven colors of the rainbow, seven gifts of Holy Spirit.

9. Shapes:

A. Oval – woman, passivity

B. Triangle – communication, between heaven and earth, fire, the number 3, trinity, aspiration, movement upward, return to origins, sight, light

C. Square – pluralism, earth, firmness, stability, construction, material solidity, the number four

D. Rectangle – the most rational, most secure

E. Cross – the Tree of life, axis of the world, struggle, martyrdom, orientation in space

F. Circle – Heaven, intellect, thought, sun, the number two, unity, perfection, eternity, oneness, celestial realm, hearing, sound

G. Spiral – the evolution of the universe, orbit, growth, deepening, cosmic motion, relationship between unity and multiplicity, macrocosm, breath, spirit, water

10. Nature:

A. Air – activity, creativity, breath, light, freedom (liberty), movement

B. Ascent – height, transcendence, inward journey, increasing intensity

C. Center – thought, unity, timelessness, spacelessness, paradise, creator, infinity,

D. Descent – unconscious, potentialities of being, animal nature

E. Duality – Yin-Yang, opposites, complements, positive-negative, male-female, life-death

F. Earth – passive, feminine, receptive, solid

G. Fire – the ability to transform, love, life, health, control, sun, God, passion, spiritual energy, regeneration

H. Lake – mystery, depth, unconscious

I. Crescent moon – change, transition

J. Mountain – height, mass, loftiness, center of the world, ambition, goals

K. Valley – depression, low-points, evil, unknown

L. Sun – Hero, son of Heaven, knowledge, the Divine eye, fire, life force, creative-guiding force, brightness, splendor, active awakening, healing, resurrection, ultimate wholeness

M. Water – passive, feminine

N. Rivers/Streams – life force, life cycle

O. Stars – guidance

P. Wind – Holy Spirit, life, messenger

Q. Ice/Snow – coldness, barrenness

R. Clouds/Mist – mystery, sacred

S. Rain – life giver

T. Steam – transformation to the Holy Spirit

U. Cave – feminine

V. Lightning – intuition, inspiration

W. Tree – where we learn, tree of life, tree of knowledge

X. Forest – evil, lost, fear

11. Objects:

A. Feathers – lightness, speed

B. Shadow – our dark side, evil, devil

C. Masks – concealment

D. Boats/Rafts – safe passage

E. Bridge – change, transformation

F. Right hand – rectitude, correctness

G. Left hand – deviousness

H. Feet – stability, freedom

I. Skeleton – mortality

J. Heart – love, emotions

K. Hourglass – the passage of time

CHARACTER ARCHETYPES

1. The Hero – In its simplest form, this character is the one ultimately who may fulfill a necessary task and who will restore fertility, harmony, and/or justice to a community. The hero character is the one who typically experiences an initiation, who goes the community’s ritual (s), et cetera. Often he or she will embody characteristics of YOUNG PERSON FROM THE PROVINCES, INITIATE, INNATE WISDOM, PUPIL, and SON.

2. Young Person from the Provinces – This hero is taken away as an infant or youth and raised by strangers. He or she later returns home as a stranger and able to recognize new problems and new solutions.

3. The Initiates – These are young heroes who, prior to the quest, must endure some training and ritual. They are usually innocent at this stage.

4. Mentors – These individuals serve as teachers or counselors to the initiates. Sometimes they work as role models and often serve as father or mother figure. They teach by example the skills necessary to survive the journey and quest.

5. Hunting Group of Companions – These loyal companions are willing to face any number of perils in order to be together.

6. Loyal Retainers – These individuals are like the noble sidekicks to the hero. Their duty is to protect the hero. Often the retainer reflects the hero’s nobility.

7. Friendly Beast –These animals assist the hero and reflect that nature is on the hero’s side.

8. The Devil Figure – This character represents evil incarnate. He or she may offer worldly goods, fame, or knowledge to the protagonist in exchange for possession of the soul or integrity. This figure’s main aim is to oppose the hero in his or her quest.

9. The Evil Figure with the Ultimately Good Heart – This redeemable devil figure (or servant to the devil figure) is saved by the hero’s nobility or good heart.

10. The Scapegoat – An animal or more usually a human whose death, often in a public ceremony, excuses some taint or sin that has been visited upon the community. This death often makes theme more powerful force to the hero.

11. The Outcast – This figure is banished from a community for some crime (real or imagined). The outcast is usually destined to become a wanderer.

12. The Earth Mother – This character is symbolic of fulfillment, abundance, and fertility; offers spiritual and emotional nourishment to those who she contacts; often depicted in earth colors, with large breasts and hips.

13. The Temptress – Characterized by sensuous beauty, she is one whose physical attraction may bring about the hero’s downfall.

14. The Platonic Ideal – This source of inspiration often is a physical and spiritual ideal for whom the hero has an intellectual rather than physical attraction.

15. The Unfaithful Wife – This woman, married to a man she sees as dull or distant, is attracted to a more virile or interesting man.

16. The Damsel in Distress – This vulnerable woman must be rescued by the hero. She also may be used as a trap, by an evil figure, to ensnare the hero.

17. The Star-Crossed Lovers – These two characters are engaged in a love affair that is fated to end in tragedy for one or both due to the disapproval of society, friends, family, or the gods.

18. The Creature of Nightmare – This monster, physical or abstract, is summoned from the deepest, darkest parts of the human psyche to threaten the lives of the hero/heroine. Often it is a perversion or desecration of the human body.

RECOGNIZING PATTERNS

The following list of patterns comes from the book How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster who teaches at the University of Michigan. If you are serious about literary analysis, then it is highly recommended that you buy this book. It goes into detail what is just briefly mentioned and is written in such a lively, witty voice that it does not read like a textbook at all! It will be well worth your time and effort to read it.

Ø  Trips tend to become quests to discover self.

Ø  Meals together tend to be acts of communion/community or isolation.

Ø  Ghosts, vampires, monsters, and nasty people and sometimes simply the antagonists are not about supernatural brew-ha-ha; they tend to depict some sort of exploitation.

Ø  There’s only one story. Look for allusions and archetypes.

Ø  Weather matters.

Ø  Violence and be both literal and figurative.

Ø  Symbols can be objects, images, events, and actions.

Ø  Sometimes a story is meant to change us, the readers, and through us change society.

Ø  Keep an eye out for Christ-figures.

Ø  Flying tends to represent freedom. What do you think falling represents?

Ø  Getting dunked or just sprinkled in something wet tends to be a baptism.

Ø  Geography tends to be a metaphor for the psyche.

Ø  Seasons tend to be traditional symbols.

Ø  Disabilities, Scars, and Deformities show character and theme.

Ø  Heart disease tends to represent problems with character and society.

Ø  So do illness and disease.

Ø  Read with your imagination.

Ø  Irony trumps everything!

Ø  Remember the difference between public and private symbols.

MLA Citation (7th Edition)

Lawrence, Lisa. “Archetypes and Symbols.” West Morris Central High School. West Morris Regional High School District, n.d. Web. 23 Jan. 2013. <http://central.wmrhsd.org/FACULTY…/Archetypesandsymbols.pdf>.

For subjects like history, geography, business and even the sciences like biology and chemistry, a lot of content needs to be memorised! These are just a few of my tips on how to memorise all of the information you need before your exam.

Repeating over time- In the best scenario, studying for a test three weeks ahead is the most optimal way to study. Usually, the process is memorising chunks two weeks before and doing past papers the week of. However, more often than not, this doesn’t end up happening because the weeks get hectic/busy so the max time before a test is probably 1.5-2 weeks. The next few points are more catered to that time period!

Palm cards- This I feel is the most common way of memorising things, by putting information on palm cards and taking them around with you to study on the train, bus, or wherever you go. The cons of this is to make sure that you don’t copy the information onto them in a passive way. You learn it over again when you write it out so make that opportunity count!

Teach content to others- I have learnt over the past few years that this is one of my favourite ways to memorise- give a family member, friend or anyone (even your pets) the notes and teach them the topic, point by point. If you can’t explain a topic in a simple way where the other person can understand, it indicates that you haven’t learnt the information properly or enough to explain it in a test situation.

Film yourself- Another of my personal favourites, read over your information one palm card/paragraph/page at a time, turn on your phone camera or photobooth (on Mac) and film yourself talking like you’re in a Youtube video. If you do this a lot, it really helps because it’s almost as if you’re talking to someone else, and speaking it out loud helps you memorise.

Writing out notes- It’s best to actually type out/write out notes as you go in class, but before tests I usually handwrite them out again. This emphasises this in your mind and you can also ensure that you have learnt everything that is on the syllabus. Making them pretty is a plus!

Watch videos and Podcasts- Youtube has so many great videos on any topic. My favourites are Khan Academy (most subjects) , Crashcourse (science and history), Lisa Study Guides (English), Stated Clearly (Biology) and Eddie Woo (Maths). If you’re a visual/auditory learner, these really help because it feels like you are learning the lesson again.

Active textbook reading- Read over the text books and annotate/highlight. However, you need to ensure that you are actually reading the text, not just highlighting the words. 

I hope this helped anyone who has trouble memorising, good luck with all of your exams!

Jade

xx

The Coach and The English Teacher

Characters/Pairing: Dean Winchester x Reader, Sam Winchester, Lisa Braeden (mentioned), Ben (Mentioned), Jessica Moore (Mentioned), OCs Sophie, Maggie, Julie (Mentioned)

Word count: 2471

Warnings: Smut, slight Dom!Sub!, Cheating. 

A/N: There’s no second part to this, and I’m not planning on doing one any time soon. Sorry! Betad by my amazing friend @whywhydoyouwantmetosaymyname

Originally posted by pablo-and-the-diamonds



What does Antonym mean?

I don’t know what he means, but you’ve spelt his name wrong.

“What the fuck!?” You lift your gaze from the answer sheet and breathe out, rolling your eyes. This fucking kid is getting in your nerves.

You sigh. Uncap the sharpie and draw a large red cross next to answer 10 and add. ‘This stopped being funny 3 months ago Louis!’ And proceed to write a big ‘D’ on the top of the sheet.

The already corrected exam goes on the growing pile by your right and shaking your head you move to get a new one from you left pile. Having the free period between classes this year really came in hand; you didn’t have to wait till you came home to correct exams; and the days you have nothing to do you could just relax and rest for 90 minutes.

And to top it all teacher’s lounge room is deserted today, so you settle on the round table with a big mug of chamomile tea and a granola bar. Tilting your mug up you drink the last drops and quickly look down when you feel your phone buzz.

The sharpie forgotten as you grab your - too big for your hand - phone, unlock it and see his name on the new incoming text.

I have 45’ free till my next class.

You think a bit, re-read the short sentence a few times before you answer.

Good for you! What you gonna do?

You’re not gonna jump off your seat and run to him just like that! Yes, you’ve done it before, but lately you have been doubting this whole thing, It’s starting get too intense…

Not one second later the screen lights again and you see a response

YOU. Come to my office, NOW!

Keep reading

How To: Take Notes for What You’re Reading in English Class

When your teacher gives you a text to read for class and they want you to be prepared to discuss the novel, play, short story etc. it can be difficult to know what notes to take on it. It might seem impossible to read a text and gather significant information on it at the same time. Through the example of The Simpsons, I’ll show you a few easy ways to recognize what aspects of a text you should “sticky note” without feeling like you’re highlighting the whole thing.   

Originally posted by such-vodka

1. To Start, consider what perspective the story is told from, not just what type of narrator the story uses. Your text might be told by an omniscient third person narrator, but which character’s thoughts are being focused on and what biases do they have? In The Simpsons episode where Lisa worries she’ll become stupid because of her genes, she sees her fate as doomed and horrifying. The perspective of this episode is from Lisa, an eight year old girl, who is highly intelligent and looks down on her brother and dad’s couch potato lifestyle. Therefore, take notes on your narrator’s judgement, reliability and their sense of identity, (if told from the third person perspective,how does the narrator portray the main character’s sense of identity?). 

Originally posted by dukefocalor

2. Next, write down or sticky note each conflict and look at how they are resolved. Consider how minor issues are solved and compare them to the climax. If you are unsure what the climax is, always remember it’s the major problem that happens before the story’s action plateaus. There might still be an overarching problem that’s not resolved if the text is part of a series, but the story still has a specific problem that gets resolved. For example, in the early seasons of The Simpsons Homer is homophobic. In one episode he worries Bart is gay because they meet a gay man, John, and after this encounter Bart shows what Homer thinks is homosexual tendencies. In each of Homer’s attempts to stop Bart from “becoming gay” he fails at instilling this sense of hyper masculinity in his son. The climax of this story is that Homer’s final attempt almost gets him, his friends and Bart killed, but John saves them. Consequently, Homer recognizes that his ignorance is dangerous and his prejudices about homosexuality being negative and contagious are wrong. The main issue of Homer fearing homosexuality is resolved, however there is still the overarching issue of Homer not fully understanding the LGTB community.  

Originally posted by amykathleendownes

3. After you analyze narration and conflict, take notes on the hierarchy of relationships between the main characters. Compare, how certain characters are below and above others in the story. See if any characters challenge their power position, do they achieve more authority or are they content with the position they’re in? It’s also important to note characters that lose power and how they lose it. Although Lisa is a child, she often holds more authority over Homer, but she obey’s Marge’s parental guidance. Consequently, Lisa respects her mother and sees Homer as inferior to her.

Originally posted by instalaugh

You don’t have to make lengthy notes while reading, but knowing what to sticky note and make point form notes on is important. Before you know it you’ll find reading and analyzing is an easy thing to multitask! 

Originally posted by simpsons-latino

Go check out the blogs I used gifs from! :)

anonymous asked:

could i please have a list of indian actors and actresses? thank you!!

I’m not sure in what the age range you want is but here are some I know of!

Males

  • Avan Jogia (24) (Gujarati Indian, English, Welsh, German)
  • Aramis Knight (16) (Indian, Pakistani, German)
  • Karan Brar (17) (Indian)
  • Dev Patel (25) (Gujarati Indian)
  • Aziz Ansari (33) (Tamil Indian)
  • Shahid Kapoor (35) (Indian)
  • Sidharth Malhotra (31) (Punjabi Indian)
  • Manish Dayal (32) (Gujarati Indian)  
  • Suraj Sharma (22) (Indian)
  • Aditya Roy Kapur (30) (Indian)
  • Ranveer Singh (30) (Sindhi Indian) 
  • Jesse Rath (27) (Goan Indian and Ashkenazi Jewish) 
  • Ranbir Kapoor (33) (Punjabi Indian) 
  • Hrithik Roshan (42) (Punjabi Indian) 
  • Kunal Nayyar (34) (Punjabi Indian)
  • Varun Dhawan (28) (Punjabi Indian) 
  • Naveen Andrews (47) (Indian) 
  • Danny Pudi (36) (Indian and Polish) 
  • Maulik Pancholy (42) (Gujarati Indian) 
  • Raymond Ablack (26) (Indo-Guyanese) 
  • Rahul Kohli (30) (Indian)
  • Sendhil Ramamurthy (41) (Kannadiga Indian and Tamil Indian) 
  • Arjun Kapoor (30) (Indian) 
  • Aamir Khan (50) (Indian)
  • Aasif Mandvi (49) (Indian)
  • John Abraham (43) (Indian)
  • Waris Ahluwalia (~41) (Punjabi Indian)

Females

  • Alia Bhatt (22) (Gujarati Indian, Kashmiri Indian, German)
  • Naomi Scott (22) (Gujarati Indian, Scottish) 
  • Ileana D’Cruz (28) (Indian)
  • Karen David (Indian, Jewish, Chinese) 
  • Priyanka Chopra (33) (Punjabi Indian)
  • Lilly Singh aka IIsuperwomanII on YouTube (27) (Punjabi Indian)
  • Katrina Kaif (32) (Kahmiri Indian and British)
  • Freida Pinto (31) (Konkani Indian)
  • Bipasha Basu (37) (Bengali Indian) 
  • Summer Bishil (27) (Indian, English, Scottish, French, German, Mexican, Cherokee)
  • Meaghan Rath (29) (Goan Indian and Ashkenazi Jewish)
  • Anushka Sharma (27) (Garhwali Indian)
  • Mindy Kaling (36) (Bengali Indian and Tamil Indian) 
  • Kareena Kapoor (35) (Punjabi Indian, Sindhi, British) 
  • Anjli Mohindra (26) (Indian)
  • Janina Gavankar (35) (Dutch and Indian)
  • Parineeti Chopra (27) (Punjabi Indian) 
  • Diana Penty (30) (Indian) 
  • Archie Panjabi (43) (Sindhi Indian) 
  • Padma Lakshmi (45) (Tamil Indian) 
  • Sonakshi Sinha (28) (Indian)
  • Tasie Lawrence (Guyanese Indian and English)
  • Lisa Haydon (29) (Indian and Australian) 
  • Hannah Simone (35) (Indian, Italian, Greek, German) 
  • Dilshad Vadsaria (35) (Indian, Portuguese, Pakistani) 
  • Sonam Kapoor (35) (Punjabi Indian) 
  • Huma Qureshi (29) (Kashmiri Indian) 
  • Asin (30) (Malayali Indian)
  • Shraddha Kapoor (26) (Marathi Indian and Punjabi Indian) 
  • Kangana Ranaut (28) (Rajput Indian) 
  • Tina Desai (29) (Indian) 
  • Shriya Saran (33) (indian) 
  • Mandeep Dhillon (25) (Indian) 
  • Aishwarya Rai (42) (Indian) 
  • Indira Varma (42) (Indian, Genoese Italian, Swiss)
  • Deepika Padukone (30) (Konkaki Indian) 
  • Melinda Shankar (24) (Indo-Guyanese) 
  • Sheetal Sheth (29) (Gujarati Indian) 
  • Neelam Gill (20) (Sikh Indian) 
  • Shruti Haasan (30) (Rajput Indian, Marathi Indian, Iyengar Indian) 
  • Tamannaah Bhatia (26) (Sindhi Indian) 
  • Kriti Sanon (26) (Indian) 

uncle-cheffington  asked:

Yooo! Man! You played Lisa? Wanna share your thought?

hellll yeah man! it’s actually one of my favorite games!╭( ・ㅂ・)و

smart writing, memorable characters, great soundtrack, plenty of feelios, also a very unique approach towards heavy themes such as love, pain, abuse and loneliness, i consider it an excellent satire on human nature and its fixation with searching (and finding) happiness; i don’t think there’s a game quite like it! 

in conclusion: 10/10 would cry over these characters again