lintroller

anonymous asked:

how many boyos do you have?

If you mean cats, I have two! 

George

and F.J. / Noodle / Turtle 

they are brothers and look a lot alike, but Noodle has gray fur and a curly tail, I think because of a gene mutation or something (no other cats in the littler or even any stray cat in the area was gray and especially none of them had tails that naturally  curl upward towards their back)

they are both beautifulle sweet boyes, besides that Noodle likes to try to eat plastic and knock cups over and climb places he shouldn’t (so I have to hide a lot of things from him, seal up cabinets, ducktape trashcan lids so he cant open them, etc.) , and George likes to scream very late at night and also eats human hair and string (so i have to keep all strings and cords away, and lintroll the floors for hair weekly, etc. ) 

but other than some of their trouble causing,  these are some beauntifulle perfecte happey boyes who enjoy food and sleebping and adventuring and running around chasing each other lol ~ Goode Brotheres… ! 

lintroller72  asked:

Lesean, as an aspiring animation writer, I'm always trying to find more information on the process of script to screen. I saw your "storyboard" pic and had a question: What level of detail do you prefer in the scripts that you storyboard from? When does descriptive detail in a script become too constricting to your abilities as a storyteller via the art? I know animation scripts are more detailed vs live, but how much detail would you consider useful? Love the tumblr, thanks for the inspiration!

Lintroller!

Thanks for watching!

1) What level of detail do you prefer in the scripts that you storyboard from?

There isn’t a particular preference for me as a storyboard artist in TV animation, really. I’ve worked from scripted formats to just outlines (general breakdown of a scene with key bits of dialog beats). 

I have more experience working from finished scripts, however. Basic narrative that describes who, when, where and why are a start. Also, having the BGs, characters, props and size comparisons from character to character, to vehicle, to props that they interact with help. Basically, writing a script that has a clear breakdown of what’s happening in a scene and who is where and doing what and how/why is required to translate script to visual. Although some things written in script don’t always work visually. In my experience overall, writers are not very visual people (meaning they aren’t doing the artists’s job, so they haven’t factored in how things would be interpreted based off said artist’s strengths, skills & visually in a cost-effective way). Some things that sound cool written do not always work visually.

2)When does descriptive detail in a script become too constricting to your abilities as a storyteller via the art?

When writers aren’t mindful of the medium they are writing for. Believe it or not, all writers are just like all artists: they have their own styles, approaches, strengths and weaknesses. For example, you have writers who are very skilled with witty banter and dialog, but suck at story structure and vice versa. Some are great at plotting but are awful at describing narrative. It’s like seeing an artist who’s amazing at expressive posing, but cannot draw backgrounds. Or amazing, technical BG artists who aren’t very good at drawing people and gestures. Or that guy/gal who’s great at “that thing” but they aren’t the best at drawing hands or vehicles. There are writers who are really great at writing male characters but suck at writing convincing women. Or great at comedy, but not good at dramatic writing and vice versa, so they have other writers come in and “punch up” those weak parts and so on. This is why many films and shows have “staff writers” and multiple writers credited for a film. It also goes for artists who are not great writers.Writers don’t get as much flack for their ills in visual work because so many other stages that can pretty their bad work up. I on many occasions in the past have literally re-written a scene with storyboards alone because the writer is just awful at staging action and visual consistency. But in the end it’s the writers who get credit for “that great scene”  not the storyboard artist.  :-)

3)I know animation scripts are more detailed vs live, but how much detail would you consider useful?

I personally don’t believe live action scripts are “more detailed” than animation scripts. In my experience, it really just depends on the nature of the project and it’s writing style. I do think there’s a bad trend in live action writers entering animation with ZERO experience writing for the medium. Some just don’t know how to write for animation (or know, or care how animation production works or is made, but know in and out the process of live action film-making), and since live action writers tend to have more seniority than animation writers, they can walk into a show with absolutely no experience and ruin a show because of over-writing and production ineptitude and still move on for more gigs. I don’t really feel this is very possible from an artists POV in the visual medium in the pro industry. An artist who has no experience in animation cannot walk onto an existing production and make important decisions and stay very long. Nor would anyone who knows what they’re doing would want them to. But this is just my limited experience. I’m sure there are those who can offer a better perspective. Certainly some of the more experienced writers out there. Thanks!