line officers

“I feel like all my kids grew up and married each other- it’s every parent’s dream” is a wonderful piece of writing because it sums up everything you need to know about Michael Scott in one line. Funny without meaning to be, deeply inappropriate and ridiculous on every level, delivered with sincere emotion, filled with so much love. 

5

What a nice thing to wake up to. Stay classy, Anon.

Why We Need Stories about Dark Things

One of the things I get tired of from time to time is the perspective that if something shows evil behavior then that means the story, song, game, whatever, is inherently bad. But there is a difference between illustrating evil behavior and promoting it.

Not all appearances of bad behavior invite bad behavior.

While one purpose of storytelling is to entertain, another purpose is to teach or educate–a purpose that in today’s world, most people seem to have forgotten.

A long time ago, there used to be all sorts of horrific stories told. Open Grimms’ fairy tales, and you’ll see that Cinderella really isn’t that Disney-friendly. But often some of those older stories were meant to teach a lesson or scare children into behaving (that latter point is one I personally don’t condone). Horrific things happen in the Bible (and the Book of Mormon). We can often learn from these accounts, but some of them are simply a record of what happened (if you believe in that), whether you like the content or not. It is what it is. Conspiring incest, rape, slaughter, and even cannibalism can be found in scripture stories. In today’s world, most people have been conditioned to believe that stories are only meant to entertain. Or entertain and uplift.

Those two things are valid. But what I get tired of, though, is the perspective that all stories should be full of puppies and rainbows (yeah, that’s an exaggeration, but you know what I mean), and that’s what we should be writing, and if a story is dark, it’s “bad” or lesser or … something.

The World Needs Stories about Dark Things

It’s important we write about what I call “the big and heavies”–rape, addiction, suicide, massacre, societal brainwashing, etc. And when I say “we,” I don’t mean specifically that you or I HAVE to; I mean “we” as in us, writers and creatives everywhere. The world needs creatives who delve into the big and heavies, and here’s why:

1. Stories provide a safe means to explore and discuss dark things

The big and heavies are vital to discuss for a healthy society. We shouldn’t be turning a blind eye to dark deeds. We should be turning the right eye to them. Literature offers a safe way to explore and discuss these issues. It offers some distance (because it’s usually a work of fiction) while simultaneously having the ability to offer closeness–empathy.

Also, fiction provides a type of lens to view these behaviors through. Speculative fiction might have a more exaggerated or symbolic lens, such as the fashion industry of Panem in The Hunger Games, or the discussion of pure bloods in Harry Potter. A lens lets us view the issues in a way that may emphasize certain points or give us a new perspective on them, and again, the distance can provide a bit of a “safe” buffer for readers. We aren’t talking about racism; we’re talking about magical blood–and we can have a whole discussion on it that correlates with issues seen in racism, and no one needs to feel uncomfortable because this is about wizarding blood. Even realistic fiction provides a perspective, though less exaggerated, to see these issues through.

2. Powerful, emotional ramification drives home a point or idea or lesson.

Unlike reading text books or the news, fiction writing often works off making the audience feel something. It appeals to emotional experience, even more than intellectual experience. It is one of the only mediums where we can put on the skin and thoughts of another person.

In parts of society, we try hard to divorce intellect and emotion, but powerful emotional experiences are often what cement ideas and lessons into our minds. Back in the day, fathers used to take their children out to their property line and beat them so that the child would never forget where the property line was. We’ve seen similar conditioning with training wild animals. Both are crude examples, of course, but the emotional experience drove home the lesson. While negative emotions are powerful, this same thing can happen with strong positive emotions. We remember powerful feelings of happiness and of love, and if there are any lessons or insights associated with those, we recall those too.

In fiction, emotional experiences can drive home powerful lessons. And they stick with the audience.

Strong emotional experiences in fiction amplify the conceptual ramifications of dark deeds, and cements into the reader the weight of such behavior, in a way that pure intellect cannot. Once we “experience” an issue, we care more about it. Fiction is a vehicle that allows us to develop and fine-tune our empathetic skills, so we can better understand and relate to those who’ve dealt with such issues.

3. Explore, cognitively, the causes, consequences, and facets of the big and heavies

In the real world, we live our own lives in our own perspectives, and that’s it. In literature, you can include several perspectives of those involved with an issue. You can often see the issue’s causes, consequences, and facets to a degree you may not in your own life. You can see far-reaching effects in a matter of hundreds of pages, rather than decades or hundreds of years. This opens up new ideas, new perspectives on the topic, which leads to more discussion.

4. To provide hope and uplift, in spite of darkness. To overcome.

I sometimes see this weird idea that an uplifting story needs to not cross some invisible line too far into the dark. In some ways, that couldn’t be further from the truth. As a Harry Potter fan, I’ve had friends come up to me and talk about how they’re disappointed that the stories got darker and darker. Maybe I’m weird (okay, there’s no “maybe” about it), but I like that. I like stories getting dark. I like when they get darker and darker. I like my evil, evil. I want the Voldemort who tries to possess Harry to get Dumbledore to kill him. I want the Voldemort who tortured animals as a small child and who murdered others to split his soul into seven pieces. The world is often an evil place. And how much more powerful is it to overcome the bowels of the most wicked, than it is to overcome a guy who shoplifted? I like my evil, evil. Not because I want to be part of the dark, but because I like seeing people overcome it.

A story that includes dark materials can be just as uplifting, if not more uplifting (because of the contrast) than a story that doesn’t. The idea that a story can’t be dark and inspiring is just unfounded.

Every Christmas season, I become a fan of The Trans-Siberian Orchestra all over again. If you’ve never heard of them, you may still recognize some of their most iconic Christmas songs, some of which have gone viral on synchronized Christmas light videos.

What many people might not realize is that each of their Christmas albums actual tells, and comes with, a written story. If you see the Trans-Siberian Orchestra live, they will read the story to you bits at a time, interspersed with music. But not all their stories are about happy sleigh rides, warm fires, Christmas hams, and decorated trees. There are parents who abandoned their disabled children, babies born addicted to crack, love that has been lost. But the stories and albums are uplifting, not because the creators avoided dark subject matter, but because they illustrated the power of overcoming–overcoming difficult times and personal mistakes. It’s hard to make it through one of their performances with a dry eye through the whole thing.

5. To render reality–others’ reality or your own

But some stories aren’t necessarily meant to be about overcoming the dark or inspiring an audience. Some stories are just about reality. Human nature. The natural man. Experiences that people actually go through. Some stories are simply meant to render, often for reasons 1-3. It’s a statement. It’s meant to create social awareness, empathy. Maybe it’s meant to start a discussion. Those stories need to exist too.

Closing Thoughts

Keep in mind that many audiences only see stories strictly as mediums for entertainment and, on a subconscious level, a reinforcement of a positive, maybe even sugary, feelings and ideas. Those audiences may (on a subconscious level) refuse anything that is otherwise, and consider any mention of the dark and heavies as something that shouldn’t be there. That is their right.

And in some cases, they are correct. Some stories do not need and should not have dark content. It doesn’t serve the purpose of the story, it messes up the tone of the story, and it can ruin what was already working. You wouldn’t, for example, put in a serious plot line in The Office about Pam being legitimately raped. It doesn’t fit.

And with all that said, you shouldn’t feel forced to write content you feel very uncomfortable writing. Your work should reflect the writerly you.

Next week, I’ll talk about how to write about dark things without promoting them.

A teenage boy is getting ready to take his girlfriend to the prom. First he goes to rent a tux, but there’s a long tux line at the shop and it takes forever.

Next, he has to get some flowers, so he heads over to the florist and there’s a huge flower line there. He waits forever but eventually gets the flowers.

Then he heads out to rent a limo. Unfortunately, there’s a large limo line at the rental office, but he’s patient and gets the job done.

Finally, the day of the prom comes. The two are dancing happily and his girlfriend is having a great time. When the song is over, she asks him to get her some punch, so he heads over to the punch table and there’s no punchline.

can’t keep my hands to myself

by goldensuns (1/1 | G | 17,202)

you can’t just dare two people to not touch each other and everything for two weeks when they literally can’t keep their hands to themselves all the time.

admin s: THIS WAS JUST SO CUTE AND FLUFFY OH MY MUST READ FOR FLUFF ENTHUSIASTS LIKE MYSELF

Deepening Social and Political Conflict in your Fiction

In many speculative fiction works, war or civil unrest is common, sometimes it’s a given. And yet so often, these grand, world-shattering wars are shallow when looked at straight-on. If you think about the history of the conflict or the spark that sent the nations to war, you can come up kind of dry. A lot of readers are tired of “WAR” being the default backdrop of a story, especially when it’s used as a prop rather than handled with the care it should be.

So how do you make sure that your social and political conflicts don’t just provide a canvas to your story, but help deepen and strengthen the world and the characters therein? Simple! Just do a little thinking! 

General Questions

  • What are they fighting over/why are they fighting?
    • Land
    • Pettiness
    • Resources
    • Religion
    • Safety/Peace-of-mind
    • Debt
    • Misconceptions or misunderstanding
    • Political or social ideologies
    • Power
    • Lies
    • Something stupid
    • Freedom (revolution)
  • Who is the root of the conflict between?
    • Nation & Nation
    • Government & People
    • Two factions of people
    • Parts of the same government
    • Government & Church/Religious group
    • Church & People
    • Government & Private institution
    • Or does it span numerous groups?
    • How has it spread?
  • How long has this conflict been going on?
  • What was the origin point of this disagreement?
  • How quickly have things escalated? 
  • How has magic or technology figured into the conflict as it is and as it’s developed?
  • What has motivated the continuation of this fighting?
  • What level of devastation have the people dealt with?
  • What is the military structure of the two sides?
  • How much do your characters know and understand about the history or reasons surrounding the war? How does that influence their feelings toward it?
  • Are there outside influences that are escalating the situation by getting involved? Perhaps manipulating or aiding one side?

Long-Time War

  • What event triggered the initial conflict? The war (if they’re two separate things)?
  • Do the people remember what started the war, or has too much time passed?
  • How has the constant presence of war altered the society and culture? 
  • How much fear is present in the day-to-day life of the citizens?
  • How do parents handle the knowledge that their children will undoubtedly go off to war at X age?
  • How has the family structure changed with the constant absence of soldiers?
  • Does lineage play any part in how likely a child is to be recruited or what level they start at?
  • How hardened have people come to war and death?
  • When does soldier training start for children? Is there a gender divide on who fights and who doesn’t? How is “fitness” determined for combat?
  • Has there been any tries at peace between the warring factions? How were they handled? Why did they fail?
  • Have art, literature, music etc. survived the enduring war? How has the umbrella of unrest affected the arts?
  • What do the people believe this war is trying to accomplish? Or do they accept it as a part of life that will likely never go away?

Sudden War

  • How do people cope with the upheaval of their lives?
  • How are soldiers selected and trained?
  • How informed are the general citizens?
  • How in-danger are the non-combatant people?
  • Are emotions running rampant, or are they in check? Or is ignorance bliss for most people?
  • How quickly did the inciting incident lead to the full-on war?
  • How well- or ill-tempered are the leaders of the sides and how does that contribute to the way the delegations, exchanges, and treaties are handled?
  • Are the people of the general public on board with going to war, or are they angry about their leaders’ involvement?
  • How well-documented and reported are the goings-on at the front lines/in governmental offices?

Civil Unrest

  • Why are the people unhappy or unsettled?
  • What groups are trying to resolve the issues or help the needy during the fragile times?
  • What are the opposing sides/ideas trying to accomplish and how are they balanced over discontentment rather than heading straight to war?
  • How much pressure is there to start an uprising?
  • Has the disagreement between some groups brought unity to others?
  • Is the unrest more mental and political, or are there mobs rioting in the streets?
  • Are there rumors (true or not) circulating that are adding to the tension?
  • Is there a press involved? How are their reportings affecting the people? How are they viewed by the ones in power?
  • How long has this unrest been present? Do people think that it will eventually lead to a revolution or war…or are they just resigned to the way things are?

Happy writing!

Check out the rest of the Brainstorming Series!
Magic Systems, Part One
Magic Systems, Part Two
New Species
New Worlds
New Cultures
New Civilizations
Politics and Government
Map Making
Belief Systems & Religion
Guilds, Factions & Groups
Science & Technology

One line prompt time!

Hey guys!! I’m in the mood to write but i have no inspiration yet again so send in a request with the number and character+fandom!! You can send me requests for celebrities as well!! Hope you guys are having a good and relaxing winter break!! Love you all very much! 

Originally posted by whats-your-name-man

1. “Come over here and make me”
2. “I trusted you!”
3. “Let’s go, right now, just You, and I”
4. “How can I hate someone so much, yet love them even more?”
5. “Please, just don’t leave me”
6. “I let her/him in, I don’t let people in”
7. “I almost lost you”
8. “I’d wait forever, as long as I could be with you in the end”
9. “Do not make me break my word”
10. “Have you seen this?”
11. “I always promised that I wouldn’t, but right now I can’t help myself. 
12. “I’m only going to ask you once more”
13. “Just, do one last thing. Kiss me”
14. “Hey, I’m with you okay? Always”
15. “We need to talk”
16. “Are you jealous”
17. “You did this, all for me?”
18. “You need me just as much as I need you”
19. “Promise me”
20. “I thought you loved me”
21. “You don’t have any right to say that”
22. “No matter where you are, or who you’re with, I will always truly, completely, love you”
23. “Two can play at this game”
24. “You’re the only one I trust to do this”
25. “You think you’re the only one that’s suffering here?”
26. “Just do it!”
27. “I’m pregnant”
28. “Marry me?”
29. “I thought you were dead”
30. “There was nothing between us. Just a weird friendship”
31. “Nothing has ever scared me more than being with you”
32. “I think I’m in love with you, and I’m terrified”
33. “I’m never going to leave you”
34. “If you keep looking at me like that we won’t make it to bed”
35. “I can’t enjoy this bagel while you’re crying, so you better tell me what the matter is.”
36. “The sun could burn out, and the whole world could die, but I’d still be utterly in love with you”
37. “Just say it, once more”
38. “You fainted…straight into my arms. You know, if you wanted my attention you didn’t have to go  to such extremes..
39. “Hey! I was gonna eat that!”
40. “No one has ever made me feel more special than you have”
41. “Stop complaining, you know you love it”
42. “I’m fed up of your stupid games”
43. “You don’t have to change for me”
44. “Will you just accept that I am hopelessly in love with you, and there’s nothing you can do that will change that”
45. “I’ll get you back for that”
46. “I can’t believe we’re actually doing this”
47. “There’s something I need to tell you”
48. “You think I need you? Because I don’t”
49. “I could never get sick of you.“ 
50. “If you really love me, you’ll let me go”
51. “Oh my god what happened?”
52. “Who did this to you?”
53. “Why is it always you?”
54. “You always say that, and you’re always wrong”
55. “I did not expect this”
56. “I told you this would happen”
57. “It’s not my fault!”
58. “I didn’t do it!”
59. “Why are you looking at me like that?”
60. “Give it back!”
61. “I made a mistake. A huge mistake.”
62. “Just shut up and kiss me”
63. “That’s it, I can’t do this anymore”
64. “I hate you so much”
65. “Because I love you god damn it!”
66. “We shouldn’t be doing this”
67. “What could go wrong?”
68. “Wow, you’ve…changed.”
69. “We’re getting too old for this”
70. “i never stopped loving you, i just stopped showing it “

anonymous asked:

yo i haven't seen pd2 in like YEARS but yuuri and victor in your little drabble had me weak and i don't even know what kinda factor they play in the movie or if there's anything else you can give us but i'd love to see more of them because. yes @ them being all over each other in front of everyone when people have shit to do, i.e. important ruling a kingdom stuff

well, the dynamic between the queen and joe in the movies (can’t say much about the books bc it’s been years since i read one of them lmao) is that they’ve got a will they won’t they tension going on and literally the entire damn country ships them (the friggin bishop or…. whatever religious leader officiating the wedding was like “finally” when they did get married in pd2 lolol) and yea that’s probably what i’d be going for. but with a couple tweaks since a lot of details have been shifted around in this au to make it work better with the yoi cast lol


Viktor’s never seen anyone as stoic as Mr Katsuki before in his life. He runs a tight ship, getting all the other security officers into line and smartly suited up. He obsessively goes over every possible breach or flaw at every venue, even drawing up blueprints and maps of the buildings Viktor sets foot in just so he knows the weaknesses of each wall, the locations of each ventilation shaft. He knows the precise details of Viktor’s schedule down to the minute, coordinating with Lilia, his chief advisor and assistant, until everything around the King seems to flow like clockwork, the well-oiled cogs of a machine designed to protect his every step.

“Why are you doing this?” he asks Mr Katsuki once, a couple months into his tenure as chief of security, and Mr Katsuki only smiles a tight, brittle smile that doesn’t reach his calculating yet sparkling eyes.

“I wouldn’t be able to live with myself if you were hurt, Your Majesty,” he replies.

Viktor laughs at just how earnestly serious the man looks. “My life is in your hands already, Mr Katsuki. You might as well call me Viktor.”

There’s a little chink in Mr Katsuki’s armour at that when his cheeks flush visibly pink. “I don’t know if I could, Your Majesty,” he says, his voice quiet, soft, and Viktor immediately realises he’d do anything to see this sort of expression on the man’s face again.

Mr Katsuki is a reassuring shadow at his side, watchful yet protective. Viktor values his work and dedication. Admires his bravery and honour.

But he doesn’t fall in love, though, until one fateful afternoon when he’s leaving his motorcade and a gunman opens fire, and Mr Katsuki is on him in an instant, tackling him onto the asphalt and shielding him with his body. As his heartbeat rings loudly in his ears, Viktor looks up into the wide-eyed expression on his chief of security’s face, and realises that the man is genuinely terrified of losing him.

“Yuuri,” he breathes, reaching up for him. The light haloes Mr Katsuki, making him almost angelic. The noise and commotion fade away with each blink of Mr Katsuki’s long lashes, and then the world fades to white.

When Viktor wakes up, he is in a hospital bed, and Mr Katsuki – Yuuri – has fallen asleep with his fingers inches from Viktor’s own. 

Keep reading

  • Hyerin: From time to time, Junghwa and I send Hani faxes from herself. From the future
  • Hani: [reading the fax] at 8am today someone poisons the coffee. Do not drink the coffee. More instructions will follow. Cordially, Future Hani
  • Hani: [knocks the coffee out of Solji's hand] NO!! You'll thank me later!
The Curve of Your Clavicle

by WhoNatural (AO3)

Pairing: Derek Hale x Stiles Stilinski

Oneshot

Word count: 6k

Rating: Teen and Up Audiences

Summary: Derek isn’t an uptight person - seriously, for an alpha, he’s downright laid-back - but something about Stilinski makes him want to bare his teeth and grasp him by the scruff and bite.

No, not bite. That would be incredibly inappropriate, of course - and Derek plus the legal department are aware of that. Anyway, the point is, Stilinski needs to be kept in line.

Or, wherein Derek’s office rival might be the same person keeping him sane at night when the loneliness hits.

Read Here!

Originally posted by dylanobrienisbaeee

anonymous asked:

Hi! I'm writing a story settled in a future where after a war, people built a new society. I've noticed that my setting is extremely vague and confusionary. I don't know when i have to insert details since i'm writing in 1st person. Like, I jave characters, I have a decent plot, I have a nice world building, but when writing I'm leaving the latter out and it's a problem. Do you have any advice? Thanks!

Setting and World Description

I love this question, because I think it’s a really, really common problem, and it’s one I’ve faced on numerous occasions. We’re often told that we should know our setting really, really well, and that we should be able to describe it in great detail. But when it comes time to put that concept into practice in the story, nothing seems to work. It all feels “info-dumpy,” or like we’re trying too hard to paint the picture, and we start to fear that we might be boring our readers, who honestly just want to know what happens in the setting. 

So how do we execute setting description in such a way that it’s informative and engaging? 

First, the real reason we need all this info…

Imagine you’ve got a small town as your setting, with a major street that runs through it. Along the street, there are several small businesses. During story prep, you may have done sketches of this street, or at least made a small diagram to lay out where all the businesses are. You may have even gotten really detailed and dotted bus stops or traffic lights, to the point where you can visualize this street perfectly

So now you go to write your first chapter. Your protagonist leaves home and walks down the street towards the bus stop to go off to work. As they walk the street, you start thinking, “Man, this is the perfect opportunity to describe all the businesses they’re passing by!” So you start to do that, and it all starts to sound like you’re giving directions. “To the left of the flower shop is the post office,” and so on, and so on. 

But here’s the big revelation to this whole conundrum. Just because you know it, doesn’t mean you have to show it. 

The reason it’s encouraged to do so much setting development isn’t so you can pass it on to your reader. At least, not everything. It’s so you know where things are, and you can navigate the world better. 

Let’s say you did zero setting development, and as you were writing chapter one, you decided to have the protagonist mail a package. You throw in a brief detail about the post office being a two-minute walk from the protagonist’s house. Then, much later, your protagonist is buying some flowers, and you throw in a detail about the post office worker loading a truck outside, because the post office is right next door. And then the protagonist takes the bus home….except, didn’t you say in chapter one that they were just a couple minutes walk from the post office? Are there two post offices? Or did they just take a bus unnecessarily? 

See, the real reason it’s so important to know how things are laid out in your setting is so that you don’t make mistakes like this. If you had made a diagram of your town, you would know where all these things were.

Side note: And just to add here, this does not mean that you have to make a diagram of a fictional town before you start writing in it. If you’re not much of a planner, and this sounds awful to you, then just make one as you go. In chapter one, when your protagonist walks to the post office, make a quick little map with a couple squares that shows how close your protagonist is to the post office. And as you mention other buildings, add them to this map. Then you’re not adding extra things you don’t need.

So in conclusion on this point, don’t feel like you have to add in all the details that you’ve worked out ahead of time. There will be some that you need to share with readers, but there will also be many that you only need to help you stay consistent throughout the story.

How do I add the necessary info?

When adding setting details, they need to be relevant. And if they’re not relevant, you need to make them relevant. We’ll continue with our small town/post office/flower shop example.

For the sake of simplicity, we’ll say that the flower shop and the post office are next to each other. If your protagonist is only visiting the post office, then the location of the flower shop is irrelevant. But if the flower shop being there is a detail that you feel the readers should know, or it’s something you want to include as a stylistic choice to add depth to your setting, then we need to make it relevant. So how do we do that?

Give the protagonist a reason to either A) Think about the flower shop or B) Notice something around the flower shop.

  • A) Think about the flower shop.

As she’s waiting in line at the post office, she may have a clear view of the flower shop through the window. But don’t just have her observe it. Have it trigger some kind of thought. Maybe she has a sick friend or relative, and it reminds her that she should buy them some flowers. Or she’s done something wrong, and flowers might be a nice peace offering. Or maybe it reminds her that her garden is overgrown and it needs tending. Any of these thoughts actually trigger deeper plot development, which makes them a double whammy.  Who is sick? What did she do wrong? Why is her garden overgrown? Is it always overgrown or is there something in her life that’s causing her to slack on this?

Whatever route you decide to go with, you’ve now made that flower shop relevant to the protagonist’s inner conflict, even if all it’s doing is triggering something.

  • B) Notice something around the flower shop.

This “something” could be something about the exterior of the building, or an employee they can see through the window or who is out on the street, or it could even be a couple of people standing outside the flower shop talking or doing something. The significance here isn’t so much the flower shop, but rather what’s happening around the flower shop.

In describing whatever is happening, you would say something like, “In front of the flower shop next door…” and then write the situation. In this method, you’re not giving special meaning or significance to the flower shop; you’re simply adding more color to your setting by mentioning that there is one, and a reader can visualize the scene even better if they picture a window of flowers behind whatever is happening. It ends up serving a huge purpose in just a few innocuous words.

The Bigger Picture 

Okay, all flower shops and post offices aside, good setting description is integrated when a character “bumps into it,” either literally or figuratively. Describe settings when a character enters them, or when they’re thinking about them. If you feel like the description is necessary, then you need to find a reason to get the character to either go there, or else think about going there, or remember going there. It needs to have context with other story information.

When it comes to complex world-building details, you follow the same principle. If there are unique circumstances that your character has to face in the world you’ve created, explain them in moments when the character is either facing those circumstances, or when they’re thinking about facing them or remembering facing them. 

I suppose you could argue that I’m making this more complicated than it needs to be, because there are readers that love description for description’s sake, but for many readers, we need context. We need to know that what we’re reading is telling a story and moving events forward, rather than just informing us or educating us on a story world. 

Plan minor story events around exposition. Make things happen in your story that help to reveal the important details of your world and setting. It might seem clunky when you first start doing this, but if you’re patient with yourself, eventually you’ll be integrating description and world backstory like a pro. 

Keep going!

-Rebekah

anonymous asked:

hey, do you have any tips for writing a personal essay?

Hi! I’ve just finished transfer applications, so I have a few tips that I picked up during the process. 

  • Start early! I’m talking a month at least
  • Your rough draft should be rough. Don’t be afraid that it will suck, because it will – just start writing.
  • I probably wrote 15 different versions of each essay I turned in. Don’t be afraid to change directions if one just isn’t working out!
  • Make a list of values that are most important to you, and then show them those values. Do you love to help others? Tell them about a time that you reached out to someone and made a difference. 
  • Write a different essay for each school, or at least tweak the same essay a little for each school.
  • Read the school’s website. What do they talk a lot about? What seems to be important qualities in students? Show them that you’d be a good fit.
  • Why should they let you into their school? What will you do to bring them some recognition in the future?
  • Why do you want to attend that school? How will it help you achieve your goals? Be specific.
  • Show them that you’ve done your research,
  • Don’t be afraid to talk yourself up! Brag a bit, just don’t sound like a jerk. 
  • Don’t try to sound too intellectual. There’s this episode of Friends where Joey is writing and uses a thesaurus for every word and ends up signing it “baby kangaroo tribiani”. Bottom line? Admissions officers can tell when you’re sucking up. Use strong words, but not words you would never use in real life. 
  • Make your essay stand out. Add in a good hook, and some interesting stories if you can. 
  • Proofread and have multiple other people proofread. It’s worth it.
  • Free writing is a lifesaver for brainstorming

Good luck!

3

You held Sam’s eyes just a moment before ducking your head with a quick, bursting laugh.

“Wow. That’s a pretty good line,” you said, challenging him, waiting for him to laugh too, to make it all one of your inside jokes that Dean would roll his eyes at later. 

When Sam said nothing though, you looked up again. He had a soft smile on his face but those eyes of his, intently fixed on you, were nothing but sincere. You blushed deeply.

“Wait. Was that a line?” you demanded in a half-whisper, leaning forward. 

“A pretty good one, according to you,” Sam said.

“But…what? You’re flirting with me?”

Now Sam laughed, deep and rich, giving a small shake of his head and pulling his teeth to graze over his bottom lip. You watched all of this with your heart in your throat, waiting for his answer. 

“Have been for the past year,” he said. “But thanks for noticing.”

x

More imagines!

iamdeltas  asked:

Maggie is a librarian and Alex is a bioengineering professor with an overdue book. Do with this what you will.

Maggie Sawyer did not spend the time getting her first master’s (or her second!) just so that she could chase down wayward professors with overdue books. She should be curating, cataloging, or researching new breakthroughs so she could better help the panicking med students and doctors find what they need as efficiently as possible.

She should be.

But no, she’s trying to track down Dr. Alexandra Danvers, holder of multiple degrees, professor that makes grown men and women cry (according to RateMyProfessor), and brilliant academic. Maggie had ordered half a dozen new journals just to make sure her publications were on the shelves and available to the kids trying to earn brownie points with the hardass.

This particular book was brand new, ordered on her request, actually. Maggie had handled the acquisition herself, and Danvers had checked it out the moment it came in.

Three years ago.

Professors can check a book out for an entire semester. Which, fine, she did. What she didn’t do, was renew the damn thing, and Maggie now had a waiting list twenty professors deep.

She tried e-mail reminders for about three months.

Left messages on Danvers’ office line. With the department head and secretary.

Snail mail? Yeah, she tried that too.

Maggie even tried using Danvers’ own students against her, sending them to ask for the stupid book.

One kid came back in tears, very apologetic that they could only get Danvers to respond to questions directly about the course, and an advanced textbook on biomedical techniques wasn’t one of them.

Maggie had, in an act of desperation, stopped in during the professor’s posted office hours. Twice. And somehow managed to miss her every time.

Her hot grad student seemed really, really amused every time she came by.

Maggie was about to give up and finally just charge it to Dr. Danvers as missing when it finally showed up. Not in the drop box or at the circulation desk, like a normal return, no. She came in to work on a Tuesday to find a giant box on her desk.

Inside the box, was another, smaller box.

The third box was marked “This box belongs to Pandora, OPEN AT YOUR OWN RISK.”

The fourth box had seen better days, beaten up with air holes cut in.

Inside that box?

Well, according to the sticky note on it, was Schrodinger’s book.

Pristine. Spine uncracked. Three years later, and it had never been opened.

Maggie flipped it around to check for the library’s label and barcode, and yes, it was the book.

The first thing Maggie did with it was take it straight to the circulation desk to be checked back in so that the stupid thing could return to public use.

The second thing she did was print out the bill for the massive fine for the book. Their school’s library capped late fees at the cost of the book, but it was a biomedical textbook, the thing cost almost $400. If Maggie were feeling nicer, she’d waive some of it.

She’s not.

The third thing she does is look up the class schedule for the summer semester and make a point to attend Danvers’ next class so she could ream the good doctor out and deliver the bill personally.

The last thing she expects when she gets there is to see the grad student up and teaching. Maggie hangs around the back of the small lecture hall, trying not to draw attention to herself. That one kid who’d returned to her crying was here. He saw her enter, and his eyes got wide. Maggie couldn’t help but laugh a little at that.

Which turned into a bit of choking when the hot grad student, today in a zipped leather jacket, jeans, and motorcycle boots, answered to “Dr. Danvers.”

That. Little. Asshole.

The bill crumpled in her hand.

Maggie Sawyer caught the eyes of Doctor Alexandra Danvers, whose lips twisted into a proud smirk. Oh, Dr. Danvers, Maggie thought, you have no idea what you’ve just started.