line officers

Here’s the whole convo between Stiles and Deaton that leads to Deaton talking about a spark:


Dr. Deaton: This part is for you, Stiles. Only you. 
[Shows him a container of black powder
Stiles: Uh, that sounds like a lot of pressure. Can we maybe find a slightly less pressure - filled task for me? 
Dr. Deaton: It’s from the Mountain ash tree, which is believed by many cultures to protect against the supernatural. This office is lined with ashwood, making it difficult for someone like Scott to cause me any trouble. 
Stiles: Okay, so then what? I just spread this around the whole building and then either Jackson or whoever’s controlling him can’t cross it? 
Dr. Deaton: They’ll be trapped. 
Stiles: Doesn’t sound too hard. 
Dr. Deaton: Not all there is. Think of it like gunpowder. It’s just powder until a spark ignites it. You need to be that spark, Stiles. 
Stiles: You mean, like light myself on fire? I don’t think I’m up for that. 


Oh wow, that’s a lot more involved than I thought!  This came from quotes on IMDB, right?  There’s a link to the scripts, I know  nonnie has this whole section somewhere.  Nonnie, come through!

youtube

Good News: Serial Liar Sean Spicer Still Can’t Find A Job‬

This should be seen as a warning to others in the Trump White House that pushing lies on behalf of Trump isn’t going to get them a high paying job in the private sector.

👏Pushing 👏 lies 👏 for 👏 Trump 👏 has 👏 its 👏 consequences 👏

Next up to end up in line at the unemployment office…..Sarah Huckabee Sanders.

“Try not to burn the house down while I’m gone.”


Yet another Kylux Inktober drawing, a Modern Witch AU this time. 

“I feel like all my kids grew up and married each other- it’s every parent’s dream” is a wonderful piece of writing because it sums up everything you need to know about Michael Scott in one line. Funny without meaning to be, deeply inappropriate and ridiculous on every level, delivered with sincere emotion, filled with so much love. 

anonymous asked:

A teenage boy is getting ready to take his girlfriend to the prom. He goes to rent a tux, but there’s a long tux line at the shop and it takes forever. He has to get some flowers, so he heads over to the florist and there’s a huge flower line. He waits forever but gets the flowers. He heads out to rent a limo. There’s a large limo line at the rental office Finally, the day of the prom comes. She asks him to get her some punch, so he heads over to the punch table and there’s no punchline.

I am mad at myself for getting so invested in this and I am more mad at you for doing this to me

Becca is stuck in a loop of god dammits so I think she’s mad too lol

10/10 good joke

-send us your favorite jokes and we’ll rate them!

Why We Need Stories about Dark Things

One of the things I get tired of from time to time is the perspective that if something shows evil behavior then that means the story, song, game, whatever, is inherently bad. But there is a difference between illustrating evil behavior and promoting it.

Not all appearances of bad behavior invite bad behavior.

While one purpose of storytelling is to entertain, another purpose is to teach or educate–a purpose that in today’s world, most people seem to have forgotten.

A long time ago, there used to be all sorts of horrific stories told. Open Grimms’ fairy tales, and you’ll see that Cinderella really isn’t that Disney-friendly. But often some of those older stories were meant to teach a lesson or scare children into behaving (that latter point is one I personally don’t condone). Horrific things happen in the Bible (and the Book of Mormon). We can often learn from these accounts, but some of them are simply a record of what happened (if you believe in that), whether you like the content or not. It is what it is. Conspiring incest, rape, slaughter, and even cannibalism can be found in scripture stories. In today’s world, most people have been conditioned to believe that stories are only meant to entertain. Or entertain and uplift.

Those two things are valid. But what I get tired of, though, is the perspective that all stories should be full of puppies and rainbows (yeah, that’s an exaggeration, but you know what I mean), and that’s what we should be writing, and if a story is dark, it’s “bad” or lesser or … something.

The World Needs Stories about Dark Things

It’s important we write about what I call “the big and heavies”–rape, addiction, suicide, massacre, societal brainwashing, etc. And when I say “we,” I don’t mean specifically that you or I HAVE to; I mean “we” as in us, writers and creatives everywhere. The world needs creatives who delve into the big and heavies, and here’s why:

1. Stories provide a safe means to explore and discuss dark things

The big and heavies are vital to discuss for a healthy society. We shouldn’t be turning a blind eye to dark deeds. We should be turning the right eye to them. Literature offers a safe way to explore and discuss these issues. It offers some distance (because it’s usually a work of fiction) while simultaneously having the ability to offer closeness–empathy.

Also, fiction provides a type of lens to view these behaviors through. Speculative fiction might have a more exaggerated or symbolic lens, such as the fashion industry of Panem in The Hunger Games, or the discussion of pure bloods in Harry Potter. A lens lets us view the issues in a way that may emphasize certain points or give us a new perspective on them, and again, the distance can provide a bit of a “safe” buffer for readers. We aren’t talking about racism; we’re talking about magical blood–and we can have a whole discussion on it that correlates with issues seen in racism, and no one needs to feel uncomfortable because this is about wizarding blood. Even realistic fiction provides a perspective, though less exaggerated, to see these issues through.

2. Powerful, emotional ramification drives home a point or idea or lesson.

Unlike reading text books or the news, fiction writing often works off making the audience feel something. It appeals to emotional experience, even more than intellectual experience. It is one of the only mediums where we can put on the skin and thoughts of another person.

In parts of society, we try hard to divorce intellect and emotion, but powerful emotional experiences are often what cement ideas and lessons into our minds. Back in the day, fathers used to take their children out to their property line and beat them so that the child would never forget where the property line was. We’ve seen similar conditioning with training wild animals. Both are crude examples, of course, but the emotional experience drove home the lesson. While negative emotions are powerful, this same thing can happen with strong positive emotions. We remember powerful feelings of happiness and of love, and if there are any lessons or insights associated with those, we recall those too.

In fiction, emotional experiences can drive home powerful lessons. And they stick with the audience.

Strong emotional experiences in fiction amplify the conceptual ramifications of dark deeds, and cements into the reader the weight of such behavior, in a way that pure intellect cannot. Once we “experience” an issue, we care more about it. Fiction is a vehicle that allows us to develop and fine-tune our empathetic skills, so we can better understand and relate to those who’ve dealt with such issues.

3. Explore, cognitively, the causes, consequences, and facets of the big and heavies

In the real world, we live our own lives in our own perspectives, and that’s it. In literature, you can include several perspectives of those involved with an issue. You can often see the issue’s causes, consequences, and facets to a degree you may not in your own life. You can see far-reaching effects in a matter of hundreds of pages, rather than decades or hundreds of years. This opens up new ideas, new perspectives on the topic, which leads to more discussion.

4. To provide hope and uplift, in spite of darkness. To overcome.

I sometimes see this weird idea that an uplifting story needs to not cross some invisible line too far into the dark. In some ways, that couldn’t be further from the truth. As a Harry Potter fan, I’ve had friends come up to me and talk about how they’re disappointed that the stories got darker and darker. Maybe I’m weird (okay, there’s no “maybe” about it), but I like that. I like stories getting dark. I like when they get darker and darker. I like my evil, evil. I want the Voldemort who tries to possess Harry to get Dumbledore to kill him. I want the Voldemort who tortured animals as a small child and who murdered others to split his soul into seven pieces. The world is often an evil place. And how much more powerful is it to overcome the bowels of the most wicked, than it is to overcome a guy who shoplifted? I like my evil, evil. Not because I want to be part of the dark, but because I like seeing people overcome it.

A story that includes dark materials can be just as uplifting, if not more uplifting (because of the contrast) than a story that doesn’t. The idea that a story can’t be dark and inspiring is just unfounded.

Every Christmas season, I become a fan of The Trans-Siberian Orchestra all over again. If you’ve never heard of them, you may still recognize some of their most iconic Christmas songs, some of which have gone viral on synchronized Christmas light videos.

What many people might not realize is that each of their Christmas albums actual tells, and comes with, a written story. If you see the Trans-Siberian Orchestra live, they will read the story to you bits at a time, interspersed with music. But not all their stories are about happy sleigh rides, warm fires, Christmas hams, and decorated trees. There are parents who abandoned their disabled children, babies born addicted to crack, love that has been lost. But the stories and albums are uplifting, not because the creators avoided dark subject matter, but because they illustrated the power of overcoming–overcoming difficult times and personal mistakes. It’s hard to make it through one of their performances with a dry eye through the whole thing.

5. To render reality–others’ reality or your own

But some stories aren’t necessarily meant to be about overcoming the dark or inspiring an audience. Some stories are just about reality. Human nature. The natural man. Experiences that people actually go through. Some stories are simply meant to render, often for reasons 1-3. It’s a statement. It’s meant to create social awareness, empathy. Maybe it’s meant to start a discussion. Those stories need to exist too.

Closing Thoughts

Keep in mind that many audiences only see stories strictly as mediums for entertainment and, on a subconscious level, a reinforcement of a positive, maybe even sugary, feelings and ideas. Those audiences may (on a subconscious level) refuse anything that is otherwise, and consider any mention of the dark and heavies as something that shouldn’t be there. That is their right.

And in some cases, they are correct. Some stories do not need and should not have dark content. It doesn’t serve the purpose of the story, it messes up the tone of the story, and it can ruin what was already working. You wouldn’t, for example, put in a serious plot line in The Office about Pam being legitimately raped. It doesn’t fit.

And with all that said, you shouldn’t feel forced to write content you feel very uncomfortable writing. Your work should reflect the writerly you.

Next week, I’ll talk about how to write about dark things without promoting them.

One line prompt time!

Hey guys!! I’m in the mood to write but i have no inspiration yet again so send in a request with the number and character+fandom!! You can send me requests for celebrities as well!! Hope you guys are having a good and relaxing winter break!! Love you all very much! 

Originally posted by whats-your-name-man

1. “Come over here and make me”
2. “I trusted you!”
3. “Let’s go, right now, just You, and I”
4. “How can I hate someone so much, yet love them even more?”
5. “Please, just don’t leave me”
6. “I let her/him in, I don’t let people in”
7. “I almost lost you”
8. “I’d wait forever, as long as I could be with you in the end”
9. “Do not make me break my word”
10. “Have you seen this?”
11. “I always promised that I wouldn’t, but right now I can’t help myself. 
12. “I’m only going to ask you once more”
13. “Just, do one last thing. Kiss me”
14. “Hey, I’m with you okay? Always”
15. “We need to talk”
16. “Are you jealous”
17. “You did this, all for me?”
18. “You need me just as much as I need you”
19. “Promise me”
20. “I thought you loved me”
21. “You don’t have any right to say that”
22. “No matter where you are, or who you’re with, I will always truly, completely, love you”
23. “Two can play at this game”
24. “You’re the only one I trust to do this”
25. “You think you’re the only one that’s suffering here?”
26. “Just do it!”
27. “I’m pregnant”
28. “Marry me?”
29. “I thought you were dead”
30. “There was nothing between us. Just a weird friendship”
31. “Nothing has ever scared me more than being with you”
32. “I think I’m in love with you, and I’m terrified”
33. “I’m never going to leave you”
34. “If you keep looking at me like that we won’t make it to bed”
35. “I can’t enjoy this bagel while you’re crying, so you better tell me what the matter is.”
36. “The sun could burn out, and the whole world could die, but I’d still be utterly in love with you”
37. “Just say it, once more”
38. “You fainted…straight into my arms. You know, if you wanted my attention you didn’t have to go  to such extremes..
39. “Hey! I was gonna eat that!”
40. “No one has ever made me feel more special than you have”
41. “Stop complaining, you know you love it”
42. “I’m fed up of your stupid games”
43. “You don’t have to change for me”
44. “Will you just accept that I am hopelessly in love with you, and there’s nothing you can do that will change that”
45. “I’ll get you back for that”
46. “I can’t believe we’re actually doing this”
47. “There’s something I need to tell you”
48. “You think I need you? Because I don’t”
49. “I could never get sick of you.“ 
50. “If you really love me, you’ll let me go”
51. “Oh my god what happened?”
52. “Who did this to you?”
53. “Why is it always you?”
54. “You always say that, and you’re always wrong”
55. “I did not expect this”
56. “I told you this would happen”
57. “It’s not my fault!”
58. “I didn’t do it!”
59. “Why are you looking at me like that?”
60. “Give it back!”
61. “I made a mistake. A huge mistake.”
62. “Just shut up and kiss me”
63. “That’s it, I can’t do this anymore”
64. “I hate you so much”
65. “Because I love you god damn it!”
66. “We shouldn’t be doing this”
67. “What could go wrong?”
68. “Wow, you’ve…changed.”
69. “We’re getting too old for this”
70. “i never stopped loving you, i just stopped showing it “

Deepening Social and Political Conflict in your Fiction

In many speculative fiction works, war or civil unrest is common, sometimes it’s a given. And yet so often, these grand, world-shattering wars are shallow when looked at straight-on. If you think about the history of the conflict or the spark that sent the nations to war, you can come up kind of dry. A lot of readers are tired of “WAR” being the default backdrop of a story, especially when it’s used as a prop rather than handled with the care it should be.

So how do you make sure that your social and political conflicts don’t just provide a canvas to your story, but help deepen and strengthen the world and the characters therein? Simple! Just do a little thinking! 

General Questions

  • What are they fighting over/why are they fighting?
    • Land
    • Pettiness
    • Resources
    • Religion
    • Safety/Peace-of-mind
    • Debt
    • Misconceptions or misunderstanding
    • Political or social ideologies
    • Power
    • Lies
    • Something stupid
    • Freedom (revolution)
  • Who is the root of the conflict between?
    • Nation & Nation
    • Government & People
    • Two factions of people
    • Parts of the same government
    • Government & Church/Religious group
    • Church & People
    • Government & Private institution
    • Or does it span numerous groups?
    • How has it spread?
  • How long has this conflict been going on?
  • What was the origin point of this disagreement?
  • How quickly have things escalated? 
  • How has magic or technology figured into the conflict as it is and as it’s developed?
  • What has motivated the continuation of this fighting?
  • What level of devastation have the people dealt with?
  • What is the military structure of the two sides?
  • How much do your characters know and understand about the history or reasons surrounding the war? How does that influence their feelings toward it?
  • Are there outside influences that are escalating the situation by getting involved? Perhaps manipulating or aiding one side?

Long-Time War

  • What event triggered the initial conflict? The war (if they’re two separate things)?
  • Do the people remember what started the war, or has too much time passed?
  • How has the constant presence of war altered the society and culture? 
  • How much fear is present in the day-to-day life of the citizens?
  • How do parents handle the knowledge that their children will undoubtedly go off to war at X age?
  • How has the family structure changed with the constant absence of soldiers?
  • Does lineage play any part in how likely a child is to be recruited or what level they start at?
  • How hardened have people come to war and death?
  • When does soldier training start for children? Is there a gender divide on who fights and who doesn’t? How is “fitness” determined for combat?
  • Has there been any tries at peace between the warring factions? How were they handled? Why did they fail?
  • Have art, literature, music etc. survived the enduring war? How has the umbrella of unrest affected the arts?
  • What do the people believe this war is trying to accomplish? Or do they accept it as a part of life that will likely never go away?

Sudden War

  • How do people cope with the upheaval of their lives?
  • How are soldiers selected and trained?
  • How informed are the general citizens?
  • How in-danger are the non-combatant people?
  • Are emotions running rampant, or are they in check? Or is ignorance bliss for most people?
  • How quickly did the inciting incident lead to the full-on war?
  • How well- or ill-tempered are the leaders of the sides and how does that contribute to the way the delegations, exchanges, and treaties are handled?
  • Are the people of the general public on board with going to war, or are they angry about their leaders’ involvement?
  • How well-documented and reported are the goings-on at the front lines/in governmental offices?

Civil Unrest

  • Why are the people unhappy or unsettled?
  • What groups are trying to resolve the issues or help the needy during the fragile times?
  • What are the opposing sides/ideas trying to accomplish and how are they balanced over discontentment rather than heading straight to war?
  • How much pressure is there to start an uprising?
  • Has the disagreement between some groups brought unity to others?
  • Is the unrest more mental and political, or are there mobs rioting in the streets?
  • Are there rumors (true or not) circulating that are adding to the tension?
  • Is there a press involved? How are their reportings affecting the people? How are they viewed by the ones in power?
  • How long has this unrest been present? Do people think that it will eventually lead to a revolution or war…or are they just resigned to the way things are?

Happy writing!

Check out the rest of the Brainstorming Series!
Magic Systems, Part One
Magic Systems, Part Two
New Species
New Worlds
New Cultures
New Civilizations
Politics and Government
Map Making
Belief Systems & Religion
Guilds, Factions & Groups
Science & Technology
History & Lore

3

Here is Edward the dachshund puppy! He belongs to one of the professors in our department and one of my fellow TAs watches him and that lines up with my office hours so life is good.

Students end up holding him when they come to see us, it’s adorable.

A teenage boy is getting ready to take his girlfriend to the prom. First he goes to rent a tux, but there’s a long tux line at the shop and it takes forever.

Next, he has to get some flowers, so he heads over to the florist and there’s a huge flower line there. He waits forever but eventually gets the flowers.

Then he heads out to rent a limo. Unfortunately, there’s a large limo line at the rental office, but he’s patient and gets the job done.

Finally, the day of the prom comes. The two are dancing happily and his girlfriend is having a great time. When the song is over, she asks him to get her some punch, so he heads over to the punch table and there’s no punchline.

  • Nicole: “id do a lot of things to you”
  • Waverly: “you mean for me?”
  • Nicole: “yeah that too”