lillehammer olympics

deadline.com
Sabastian Stan To Play Jeff Gillooly In ‘I, Tonya’
By Patrick Hipes

EXCLUSIVE:  Sebastian Stan is going from Winter Soldier to another icy role. The Marvel Universe regular who will reprise in Avengers: Infinity War has been cast as Tonya Harding’s husband Jeff Gillooly in I, Tonya, the edgy comedy film being directed by Craig Gillespie that stars Margot Robbie as Harding. The project, penned by Steven Rogers, will expose the absurd, tragic and hilarious story-behind-the-story of one of sports’ most infamous scandals.

The project, is ramping up now after Miramax secured U.S. distribution rights yesterday to the film about former U.S. figure-skating champ Harding, who fell into disgrace after she and Gillooly plotted to attack rival Nancy Kerrigan right before the 1994 U.S. Championships in Detroit. Production gets underway in January.

Gillooly became a public figure in the subsequent investigation and trial, at which it was revealed he and Harding’s bodyguard Shawn Eckhardt hired Shane Stant to break Kerrigan’s leg so she couldn’t compete in the upcoming Winter Olympics in Lillehammer. Harding was eventually banned for life from the sport after both she and Gillooly reached plea deals; Gillooly was sentenced to two years in prison for racketeering, with the judge determining he was the “driving force” in the plot.

Kerrigan had to withdraw from the U.S. championships after the attack but she and Harding made the Olympic team. Their every move was caught on camera during the Lillehammer Games; Kerrigan won silver and Harding finished eighth.

Clubhouse Pictures’ Bryan Unkeless, LuckyChap’s Robbie and Tom Ackerly, and Rogers are producing the pic, while AI’s Len Blavatnik and Aviv Giladi are exec producers. Rosanne Korenberg is overseeing the film for Miramax, and Sierra/Affinity is selling offshore.

Stan recently shot Stephen Soderberg’s NASCAR-set heist pic Logan Lucky, We Have Always Lived In A Castle opposite Alexandra Daddario, and I’m Not There. He reprises as Winter Soldier, aka Bucky Barnes, in Avengers: Infinity War which comes out in May 2018.

He is repped by ICM Partners, Brookside Artists Management and Sloane, Offer.

Sebastian Stan To Play Jeff Gillooly In ‘I, Tonya’

EXCLUSIVE:  Sebastian Stan is going from Winter Soldier to another icy role. The Marvel Universe regular who will reprise in Avengers: Infinity War has been cast as Tonya Harding’s husband Jeff Gillooly in I, Tonya, the edgy comedy film being directed by Craig Gillespie that stars Margot Robbie as Harding. The project, penned by Steven Rogers, will expose the absurd, tragic and hilarious story-behind-the-story of one of sports’ most infamous scandals.

The project, is ramping up now after Miramax secured U.S. distribution rights yesterday to the film about former U.S. figure-skating champ Harding, who fell into disgrace after she and Gillooly plotted to attack rival Nancy Kerrigan right before the 1994 U.S. Championships in Detroit. Production gets underway in January.

Gillooly became a public figure in the subsequent investigation and trial, at which it was revealed he and Harding’s bodyguard Shawn Eckhardt hired Shane Stant to break Kerrigan’s leg so she couldn’t compete in the upcoming Winter Olympics in Lillehammer. Harding was eventually banned for life from the sport after both she and Gillooly reached plea deals; Gillooly was sentenced to two years in prison for racketeering, with the judge determining he was the “driving force” in the plot.

Kerrigan had to withdraw from the U.S. championships after the attack but she and Harding made the Olympic team. Their every move was caught on camera during the Lillehammer Games; Kerrigan won silver and Harding finished eighth.

Clubhouse Pictures’ Bryan Unkeless, LuckyChap’s Robbie and Tom Ackerly, and Rogers are producing the pic, while AI’s Len Blavatnik and Aviv Giladi are exec producers. Rosanne Korenberg is overseeing the film for Miramax, and Sierra/Affinity is selling offshore.

Stan recently shot Stephen Soderberg’s NASCAR-set heist pic Logan Lucky, We Have Always Lived In A Castle opposite Alexandra Daddario, and I’m Not There. He reprises as Winter Soldier, aka Bucky Barnes, in Avengers: Infinity War which comes out in May 2018.

He is repped by ICM Partners, Brookside Artists Management and Sloane, Offer.

Source: Deadline.com

10

HAPPY 79TH BIRTHDAY KING HARALD V (b. 21 February 1937)

Every person has a great power in themselves - that can carry us through what we encounter in life. - King Harald V about standing together

Prince Harald was born on 21 February 1937 as the only son of the then-Crown Prince Olav and of Princess Märtha of Sweden in Skaugum and was baptized in the Royal Chapel in the Royal Palace in Oslo on 31 March 1937 by Bishop Johan Lunde. His godparents were: King Haakon VII of Norway, Queen Maud of Norway, Prince Carl of Sweden, Princess Ingeborg of Sweden, King Leopold III of Belgium; King George VI and Queen Mary of the United Kingdom and Crown Princess Ingrid of Denmark. His parents already had two daughters, Princess Ragnhild and Princess Astrid.

During World War II he fled with sisters and mother from Norway for the United States from Petsamo, Finland, aboard the United States Army transport ship American Legion. Harald and his mother and sisters lived in Washington, D.C., during the war, while his father, Crown Prince Olav, and his grandfather, King Haakon, stayed in London with the Norwegian government-in-exile. One of the notable events he remembers from that time is standing behind Franklin D. Roosevelt when he was sworn in for his fourth term on the South Portico of the White House in 1945. In 2015, he became the world’s first reigning monarch to visit Antarctica, specifically the Norwegian dependency Queen Maud Land.

In March 1968 it was announced the engagemement between the Crown Prince and Miss Sonja Haraldsen. The couple had known each other for nine years before their marriage was approved. The wedding was held in Oslo Cathedral on 29 August 1968. They have two children, Princess Märtha Louise (b. 22 September 1971) and Crown Prince Haakon b. 20 July 1973) and through them 6 grandchildren.

An avid sailor, Harald represented Norway in the yachting events of Olympic Games in Tokyo in 1964 and in Mexico City in 1968 and the Munich 1972. The Crown Prince carried the Norwegian flag at the opening parade of the 1964 Summer Olympics. In 1994, both the King and Crown Prince Haakon played roles during the opening ceremony of the Lillehammer Olympics. The King opened the games, while the Crown Prince lit the cauldron, paying tribute to both the King and his grandfather as Olympians. The King has also represented Norway at opening ceremonies of Olympic Games, among them Torino and Beijing.

Twice since the start of the twenty-first century King Harald was unable to perform his monarchical duties due to ill-health: in December 2003 to mid-April 2004 due to urinary bladder cancer, and in April to early June 2005 due to aortic stenosis.

I live by the principle that as long as not proven otherwise, I’m healthy and will live life that way.” - King Harald when asked about if he was not afraid of relapse of cancer.

Following a lengthy period of ill-health, his mother Crown Princess Märtha died of cancer in Oslo in 1954. Her death came little more than three years before her husband ascended the throne as king. His father, King Olav V, died on 17 January 1991 and Harald V succeeded him as the King of Norway.

8

Today, on 12 February 2016, Her Royal Highness Princess Ingrid Alexandra lit the cauldron of Lillehammer 2016 Winter Youth Olympic Games during the Opening Ceremony at the Lysgardsbakkene Ski Jumping Arena in Lillehammer, Norway.

Photo: IOC/Gettty Images

youtube

People who know me at all well also know that I have had, for the last few years, a completely inexplicable obsession with figure skating.  I started following, with my mother, the season leading up to the 2010 Olympics, and somehow or other both of us got hooked.  As a child, I was morbidly uninterested in watching or participating in girlish activities (ballet, dance in general, dressing up or playing with Barbies), or anything physical–figure skating of course being the ultimate convergence of these two categories.  I started following figure skating after a cerebral and stationary childhood and adolescence, at a point when I was at perhaps the most cerebral phase in my life: working on a novel, gearing up for grad school, and thinking more about literary theory than I did about anything else.  

So why figure skating?  I still don’t know, though I do have my theories: in it I found the most compelling physical metaphor I have yet to locate for the mental rigor that I spend most of my time cultivating–in sheer difficulty, in energy and athleticism required, and finally in elegance.  Skating is not just a solo sport but also a remarkably solitary one: no matter how many coaches and handlers and choreographers and sponsors and specialists and therapists have helped you in the months and years leading up to your performance, your ability to succeed in competition is determined almost entirely but what you are able to do in six and a half minutes of total ice time.  You are responsible for both your faults and your victories.  You are responsible for the outcome of your goals.  

And, though I used to think it was unfair that skaters failed or succeeded based on a few performances–at Nationals, at Worlds, at the Olympics–now I think this aspect of the sport is one of the things that makes it so magnificent: whether or not you become a legend is not based on whether you have the capacity to skate well, is not based on whether or not you were able to skate a perfect program once or ten times or a thousand times when no one was watching you and the pressure was off.  It is based on whether you are able to skate to the center of a patch of ice 200 feet long by 85 feet wide, in front of thousands of people in the stands and millions if not billions of viewers at home, knowing that what you are able to do in the next two hundred and forty seconds will decide the course of the rest of your life, and bring yourself to a place where you are able to turn fear into concentration and desire into will.  It’s not a contest of ability, but a contest of performance, of power, of control.  And it doesn’t get much better than that.

Furthermore, like every sport, it is a sport of narratives–and perhaps never moreso than at the 1994 Olympics in Lillehammer, Norway.  I’ll confess that it was my obsession with Tonyagate that brought me to these particular Games, but Tonyagate isn’t the only interesting thing about them by a long shot.  I spent the weekend reading Christine Brennan’s The Inside Edge, a chronicle of her time following skaters on the 1995-1996 season, and she discusses at length the controversy surrounding Oksana Baiul’s Olympic victory over Nancy Kerrigan, who walked away with a silver medal after losing to Oksana by a tenth of a point.  (China’s Chen Lu rounded out the podium, taking home a bronze.)  People did and do debate this victory, and though, based on their skating alone, either woman could just as easily have won–both of their programs were, technically, almost unimpeachable–the clear winner, in terms of narrative alone, was Oksana Baiul.  And when what happens on the ice is all but identical from skater to skater, the performer with the better story will probably always win.

For a moment, let’s go back to Tonyagate.  It’s not the facts–specifically the level of involvement Tonya had in the plot against Nancy, which we may never really know–that matter here, so much as a public’s imagination of the crime, and on that level Tonya may as well have bashed Nancy on the leg herself.  The collective unconscious also managed to transform a lead pipe into a crowbar and Nancy’s bruised thigh into a broken kneecap; the upshot is that Nancy, going into the Olympics was a fragile, victimized good girl who had to prove that her brush with violence had left her talent untouched; in essence, she was an underdog we were ready to root for.  Her skating had always been artistically advanced, but she had struggled in previous competitions with consistency, athleticism, and grace under pressure; in her Olympic performances, she finally summoned the strength to skate clean, and so see through her fear to victory.

The only problem was Oksana Baiul–the sixteen-year-old Ukrainian orphan who had learned to skate in a rink so impoverished the students had cleared off the ice with their hands.  Where Nancy was a lithe, graceful ice queen, her face stoic, her movements deliberate to the last millimeter, Oksana was a hatchling, a peanut, a brave little girl who appeared to lose herself in her performances, no matter how many people were watching her.  You could see joy on her face when she completed a jump; you could see how happy she was just to be skating.  Now, this idea of Oksana being more genuine was itself performance–she was a gifted performer who courted the judges and smiled at the cameras, and had a presence Nancy was simply without–but she was, for this reason, a more attractive gold medalist.  Her story was better than Nancy’s, her life sadder, her victimhood more comprehensive, and her willingness to share her triumph with the audience more infectious.  Even her errors suggested obstacles overcome: when, in the long program, she popped a triple lutz in the opening thirty seconds, she changed her program at the last minute to accomodate another one, which she successfully landed on tired legs (recalling Midori Ito’s last-minute triple axel in Albertville in 1992, which earned her a silver medal after a disastrous short program).  After leaving the ice, Baiul burst into tears and collapsed into her coach’s arms; Nancy remained impassive as her marks were read, barely cracking a smile when she saw she had come in first.  Tonya made us love Nancy, but she didn’t make us love her enough.

3

Why would a couple of comedians build a museum in their Brooklyn apartment hallway dedicated to figure skaters Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan?

Viviana Olen and Matt Harkins were only 6 and 7 in 1994, when Harding’s ex-husband and his friend plotted to wallop Kerrigan on the knee with a baton, knocking her out of the national championship.

“We remember a very Disney version of the story,” says Olen. “You know, this crazy, trashy person beat up the beautiful ice princess.”

But then, last year, the roommates watched an ESPN documentary about the scandal, and learned how complex the main characters really were. They were riveted.

So they set up a Kickstarter fund, raised $2,036 and made a museum — in the passageway of their third-floor walk-up.

The Tonya Harding & Nancy Kerrigan 1994 Museum held its grand opening gala Saturday. Although the project in Olen and Harkin’s dark hallway is light-hearted, the exhibition is no joke.

Like ‘Dynasty’ On Ice: The Nancy Kerrigan And Tonya Harding Museum

Photo credits: Top: Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding at a practice session at the 1994 Olympics in Lillehammer, Norway. (Pascal Rondeau/Getty Images) 

Center: Visitors tour the museum. (Courtesy of Matt Harkins and Viviana Olen) 

Bottom: Contributions to the museum came from around the country, including these cross-stitched portraits of Kerrigan and Harding. (Courtesy of Matt Harkins and Viviana Olen)

Watch on docutube.tumblr.com

The Price of Gold (2013) 1h 18min.

The world couldn’t keep its eyes off two athletes at the 1994 Winter Games in Lillehammer - Nancy Kerrigan, the elegant brunette from the Northeast, and Tonya Harding, the feisty blonde engulfed in scandal. Just weeks before the Olympics on Jan. 6, 1994 at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships, Kerrigan was stunningly clubbed on the right knee by an unknown assailant and left wailing, “Why, why, why?” As the bizarre “why” mystery unraveled, it was revealed that Harding’s ex-husband, Jeff Gillooly, had plotted the attack with his misfit friends to literally eliminate Kerrigan from the competition. Now two decades later, “The Price of Gold” takes a fresh look through Harding’s turbulent career and life at the spectacle that elevated the popularity of professional figure skating and has Harding still facing questions over what she knew and when she knew it.

Meeting Meryl, Charlie, and The Moms - part I

The whole thing started when I got the tickets and tweeted Meryl that I would bring her Chocolate from Norway, and she responded all excited. So I put together a little (big) gift bag for both her and Charlie.

The gifts for Meryl. Norwegian and Austrian chocolate, Manner schnitten, an Austrian wafer cookies, paper clips formed as dogs (it was cute, so I got it), a sorgen fresser (I’ll explain later), a home made dog toy for her future puppy, and 2 door nobs. (Comments on all later)

Gifts for Charlie. Norwegian and Austrian chocolate. Manner schnitten, an Austrian wafer cookies, dried fruit and nuts, sorgen fresser and two home made toys for DJ and Finn.


So I get to Zürich, and I need to figure out how to get them the gifts. I try twitter, but no luck, so I leave a message on Meryl’s instagram, just asking where I could leave the gifts if they were too busy, just so they would get them. 

Then right as I get to the show on Saturday, she answers me, asks if I know the cast hotel, and if I could be there Sunday morning at 1030. And of course I can.

I get to the hotel, early of course. Fancy. I wait, and at 1030, Cheryl walks out of the breakfast area, she sees the bags I guess and assumes I’m there to meet them as she comes over to me. She tells me that Meryl is running behind, she came in very late the night before, and that she will be down as soon as she can. She was heading up there with coffee and something to eat, but would be right back.

She comes back and then introduce herself. Very cute. She tells me to follow her into the breakfast area and that I can wait with her and Jacqui. I sit down in a booth with them, and they ask me all kinds of questions about me, what I do, where I live, and when I say Vienna, they say it’s one of their favorite places. They tell me that Meryl and Charlie were there when they were very young, and they loved it. They wer apparently there during a snow storm. They ask how I became a skating fan, and I tell them it’s all because of the Lillehammer Olympics in 94. Then we get into the presidential election, social government and health care and then we get into Art on Ice.

Jacquie tells me that Charlie feels very honored and is very excited about being on the show. He is having a great time.

We talk about Sway, that I saw it in NY. Cheryl loves Sway. She went to all of them, and wished that Jacqui had gotten a chance to see it, but that it’s over. They expanded too quickly and that it was impossible to travel with that many dancers.

Cheryl suddenly says that Meryl is here, and I look around and there she is. I can’t take my eyes off her as she is talking to someone as she is making her way over after having spotted us and said. “There you are”

When she finally gets to the table, first thing she does is apologize for being late, and I just thank her for taking the time at all. She is just gorgeous, simply stunning.

I have to do it in parts, here is the first. I should have the second ready tomorrow.

Found this gem on FanForum. Translated by Lizy (found on Tumblr at believeitsadream!)
on FF.

TESSA VIRTUE AND SCOTT MOIR: “WE’RE GOING TO BE OLYMPIC CHAMPIONS!”They’re beautiful. They’re talented. Their programs are thought out to the most miniscule detail. Ideal style, unique choice and combination of music, costumes, and movements. This is true art and the highest mastery of the sport. They’re ideal in everything. They’re Olympic champions.—–At the Olympics in Vancouver, Canadian pair Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir were undoubtedly much higher than any of the other dance pairs, that thoughts did not even arise in people that their victory was not deserved. Behind this victory is the training team of Marina Zueva and Igor Shpilband. They were the ones in Vancouver who gave a new direction for the sport of ice dance. Guest for the day – Marina Zueva – talks about her “golden” students.Marina, what were you feeling at the moment when your figure skaters won in Vancouver? You know, it wasn’t unexpected. They won the original dance, and then it was clear that Tessa and Scott are very close to victory. And then, it was pretty natural and we were ready for it. First of all, Tessa and Scott were one hundred percent ready. I believe that we planned their season correctly, because it was long, difficult and we had to calculate everything correctly. The free dance to Mahler’s 5th Symphony was planned by me two years ago. In the pre-Olympic season, Tessa and Scott performed to Pink Floyd, and that was a special program, put together by me so that in the next season they would shine with their performance to Mahler. So then you started relaying the message even then to the pair, the judges, and the audience? The Olympics can’t be won easily. Especially as concretely as Scott and Tessa did. How did you prepare them for the Olympics? Told them something, somehow preped them?… I was telling them: “You’ll win the Olympics and, maybe, not one, if the main idea of all of your creation will be to make people happy.” Before the start I told them: “You have to gift your performances to your compatriots.” Tessa and Scott are big patriots of their country. Canadians generally act differently with this than Americans, they’re deep patriots of their nation. That’s why winning the Olympics wasn’t the goal in the end. The most important thing was to allow the audience to have fun, to force a million people to feel happiness in their souls. But there was readiness for victory: in one interview Tessa said: “I was dreaming (as in sleep dreaming, not like goal dreaming) for a long time that I won the Olympics.” Were you worried that they were overconfident? No, I wasn’t worried. We tried to establish a normal atmosphere for them. We weren’t constantly training on the Olympic arena. And at training, we didn’t allow them to do more than needed. Were there generally any boundaries with journalists? No, but for a long time prior we were discussing this with Skate Canada: how many interviews are there supposed to be, how much time are they supposed to devote to this. In the end, everything was very well planned. Why did you choose Mahler for the Olympic free dance?This is one of my favorite pieces. Apparently, most of Mahler’s pieces relate to death, but this piece sounds very bright to me. I read a lot about this composer. When Mahler wrote “Adagietto” and showed it to his bride, Alma, she felt that it was a proposal for marriage. When I found out this story, I thought: how can a proposal to marriage be thought of by someone as having to do with death? This can’t be. Reversely, it is a hope for a bright future. I chose the performance by a German orchestra, which plays the composition in a more high/happy key, because all other orchestras of the world play it with a shade of darkness. I wanted for many people to come to know Mahler. In America, there are very few who know of him. Everyone knows Tchaikovsky, Rahmanin, Stravinsky. Beethoven….thanks to the performance of my skaters, many more people now love him, and I’m glad, that I could change the acceptance of this composer just a little bit. Marina, in what moment did you see them as future champions? No, I didn’t see them as future champions. I just saw that this was a diamond in dance. That this was a boundless chance to show harmony of movements, feelings, harmony of the merging with music. And I was always telling them this. And always added that “there will be a result, if you’ll be able to do this and if you’ll be able to convey this to the audience.” Ok, when did you realize that they can fight for Olympic gold? You know when? At their first senior world championships, which took place in Tokyo, Japan. The day before worlds, I spoke to the president of Skate Canada, and he asked, “What place can they get?” I said, “Sixth.” Nothing like this every happened in ice dance – that yesterday’s juniors at their first senior world championships take sixth place. But I felt that they can do it. That’s what happened. On the other hand, when I, myself, skated in 1977 and went to my first world championship (that was also held in Japan), my partner and I took fifth place. Though, that wasn’t the first year that we were skating on the senior level. But we were the third pair from our nation. I told this to Tessa and Scott: “Compete with me.” As a joke, I distracted them from the seriousness of the moment.I saw that technically, they were the best, because they’ve been skating together since they were children. And you can’t argue with that. They have the same body rhythm. But there was a problem with lifts. And I said, “Guys, if you don’t learn lifts, then you won’t be able to fight for the highest titles.” They were bright from the beginning, but in order to portray the true image, everything needs to be irresistible. And I started to lead them in that direction. I looked over a ton of material on lifts, I turned to Skate Canada with a favor for them to find me good coaches. They helped, they found specialists. Tessa and Scott began working with gymnasts, then with acrobats, then we turned to Cirque du Soleil. And here’s the result. Can you remember the first time you saw them? It was in 2002. Tessa and Scott came to us to work on Russian dance. We gave them one lesson. Igor worked on technique and I worked on choreography. At the time, they were little kids, but you know what shocked me most, how quickly they absorb the material! And I think that it was in that moment that they felt that we were their coaches. You know, each person has their own coach, but the talent is always there and it knows what it needs. And in 2004 they came to us for good and we started to work. Who turned to you and asked to put them in your group?
Their parents. Do you remember that first conversation? Honestly, no. I just know that a Canadian coach, Mary Jane Stong (spelling?); she was the coach of the Wilson/Makkoll pairing. She knows me from when my partner and I were competing against her skaters in the world championships. Then I was working under contract in Canada. That’s where Katia Gordeeva and Sergei Grinkov were preparing for the Lillehammer Olympics. Tell us about Scott and Tessa’s families. Who are their parents? There are many Moirs in London, they’re all relatives and they all have a relation to figure skating. Scott’s mom and aunt are twins and they both work as coaches for figure skating. Scott’s brother also competed in ice dance with his cousin – there was a pairing Moir/Moir.Tessa’s mother and father are lawyers. No one has any relation to figure skating, but the family is into sports. Her dad regularly goes to the gym while her mother does ballet. Her mom generally played a great role in Tessa’s fate. She saw Tessa’s talent and had her start figure skating and ballet, which Tessa trained in for fourteen years. Her mom always helps with the design of the costumes. And I want to tell her a huge thank you for this because her help is just priceless. Of course everyone makes mistakes, and there are arguments, but the outfits always seem to accentuate Tessa’s features. Scott’s costumes are sewed in Toronto, at a special place for men’s clothing. What were they like when they first came to you? Tessa – a small and skinny girl with thin braids. Everyday for practice she’d wear a different sports outfit. She had overalls from ballet, and everyday she’d come in new ones. This is the way in which she was different from the other girls. And it’d seem that this was a tiny detail that wouldn’t really be paid any attention by me, but I was always interested in what she’d wear the next time. And I was waiting for every lesson. That’s Tessa. Generally she’s an introvert, she keeps everything inside. This is a person who doesn’t go with openness, she protects herself. She has many feelings, emotions, wishes, but they’re not for show.Scott’s the complete opposite of Tessa – he’s an open guy, the soul of company. He has a mass amount of friends, he’s always happy, and he’s always energized.  Is it hard working with two people who are so different?What does that have to do with anything? Every person is absolutely different…and I think that I work more with talent than with a particular person. That’s why my relationship with the skaters isn’t really affected by their characters off the ice. I think that this helps me immensely. I see talent and I work with it. I have a feeling that it is my duty before God to develop this talent, show everyone and inspire them with the good.After the Olympics, many people were talking about Tessa and Scott’s programs; we were receiving many letters. But the strongest one for me was one letter. A Canadian couple sent this to Tessa and Scott’s email. They were watching the Olympic Games. And when Tessa and Scott were performing their free dance, the woman said to the main, “Look at how a man should treat a woman!” And while they were skating, she would periodically focus his attention on this. And at the moment when Tessa and Scott were receiving their gold medals, the man proposed to the woman. Of course this touched me. For me this was the strongest, in the area of feelings, because feelings – that’s what I raised Tessa and Scott on. I forbid them to skate without feelings. I said, “Anybody, only not you. You even have to skate in practice with feelings.” What kind of relationship do they have off the ice?They’re friends. In some interview they said, “We’re like brother and sister.” When I heard this, I thought, this is new. (NOTE: THERE’S A RUSSIAN SAYING AT THAT PART, AND THERE’S NO LITERAL TRANSLATION, SHE WAS JUST KIND OF LIKE YEAH, SURE) I’m working here with feelings, and they’re apparently like brother and sister. They already have a certain image, an image on the ice. I created it and I’m not shy saying it, because it was systematically planned. Because I saw that this was the better part of them. You told them that they were wrong? Of course! Figure skating – it’s fifty percent sport, fifty percent art. And what’s art? It’s image. So that’s why you have to think before saying anything. What do they do for fun? Tessa like music, ballet, design. Scott reads books. For Americans this is rare. Generally, they’re like kids cause they are kids. Twenty and twenty-two years – for America that’s very young. They play video games. Tessa goes to university. For what? To become a lawyer and she’s taking art history. Charlie White is also studying to be a lawyer. We’ll see …two such great artists, we’ll see what kinds of lawyers we’ll get out of them?! And Meryl Davis is studying anthropology. And how she got to this by studying figure skating her entire life I’ll never know! What do they do in their free time? They are all very good friends. It’s hard to believe, but it’s true. Tessa kind of stay apart sometimes, but everyone else goes out to eat and they talk. Two seasons in a row in the summer with some other friends they organized a baseball team. Can you imagine, after training on the ice they go to practice for baseball, then they have games and competitions. This is how much energy, strength, and enthusiasm is needed! How did you live through Tessa’s operation? We lived through it like anyone else. What, is she the first person to become injured? Of course we try to do everything to keep the body stable, but this is a human’s body. When the doctors said that surgery is needed, we decided that the faster they do it, the better. And the more we listen during recovery, the more we’ll be listening to the suggestions of the doctors, the faster she’ll recover. Every week we met with a leading doctor, with physiotherapist. I was talking to them about what kinds of practices Tessa can have.  Who’s the leader in their pair? On the ice, probably Scott, he’s more intense in work. But in regards to some questions off the ice, probably Tessa. Who gives in more often? When they’re working, I don’t really notice any conflicts. They have a common goal, they both like to skate, and everything else doesn’t bother them when they’re working. The only time there are arguments is when we need to pick music. This especially happened at the beginning when we first started working together. In that season they had to skate the waltz. We had about seven or eight choices, but we couldn’t come to a unanimous decision. What did I do? On two pieces of paper, I wrote all the names of the programs and gave one to Tessa and one to Scott, and I asked them to write them in order of preference. And then when I put it all together, it showed what pieces were closer to them. Generally, in reference to picking music, with them it’s difficult. They both need to love the music, and they need to feel it. After the choice of “Umbrellas of Cherbourg” there were no more issues. Same with Pink Floyd and of course with Mahler’s 5th Symphony. In the pre-Olympic season, I was long awaiting their suggestions for a free dance program, and Igor’s suggestions. In our group, it’s never happened that I brought the music and said, “This is what you’ll be skating to.” It just doesn’t happen. Oppositely, we always compete to see who’ll suggest the better music, maybe one of them has something better, maybe I wasn’t entirely correct. But, happily, I was correct with this. I understood that this would be genius. And when Tessa and Scott heard this music, they immediately agreed to dance to it. Additionally, they said, “Marina, we’re going to be Olympic champions.” Really? Yes. It went like this. We were at the rink, but, so that we wouldn’t listen to the music in the rink itself, we went out to my car – so that the atmosphere was more intimate, so that nothing would bother us. And the three of us went outside in our skates, sat in my car, and I put on Mahler. And after the music ended, the first thing they both said, “Marina. We’re going to be Olympic champions.” Funny, I only thought of that now. Tell us, have they changed after becoming Olympic champions? Several weeks after the Olympics we went to the World Championships, and after that I haven’t seen them yet. So I just don’t know whether they changed or not. They’re still on tour. They had a tour in Japan, then the Canadian tour of Stars on Ice. I don’t think that right after the Olympic Games they understood their position. Hopefully they still don’t completely understand their position. We’re starting practice again at the end of June, so we’ll see then. Did you give them some kind of assignment before the tour – to think about the music or just about the new season? No. I believe that they just need to relax, get away from the stressful situations. These two years were very pressured in terms of preparations. And then the operation. I told you that the surgery was ordinary. Of course it was ordinary. But ordinary from the coach’s position. But for them it’s life, it’s a whole tragedy. Tessa was constantly worrying, hoping her legs wouldn’t betray her. Her legs didn’t betray her. I just tried to make it so that the situation would go calmly and smoothly. Marina, what’s most extraordinary for you about this pair? Harmony. Harmony in everything. If you look at them separately or individually, then yes, Scott is an interesting young boy, Tessa is a charming girl. But when they’re together – it’s completely unique harmony between a man and a woman. At least for me. I saw that in them, and for me they’re Katia and Sergei in ice dance. What separated Gordeeva and Grinkov from everyone else? Harmony. They revolutionized pairs skating, and Tessa and Scott revolutionized ice dance.  By: Elena Semikova

The Rink At Rockefeller Center

600 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10020

If you haven’t cried in the Rockefeller ice rink while pretending you’re Nancy Kerrigan in the 1994 Lillehammer olympics now is a great time to take a long look in the mirror and ask yourself, “WHERE DID I GO WRONG????????????” After you do that for a few hours, don’t worry there’s still time to make a change!! Throw on your scrunchie and glitter leotard and then get to this cry IMMEDIATELY!!!!!!!!!! People may look at you weird, but they already always do because you’re always crying all of the time so it’s nothing new!!!!! A++++++++++++