liljenquist

Confederate Pvt. Simeon J. Crews of Company F, 7th Texas Cavalry Regiment

Poses with his cut down saber and a revolver. After the news of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s surrender, his unit disbanded on May 27, 1865, at Wild Cat Bluff in Texas. - Purchased from: B.G. “Chip” Newman, Broker of Fine Antiquities, Madison, Mississippi, 2012. 

Forms part of: Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress)

Lieutenant Colonel Warren Adams of Co. H, 1st South Carolina Infantry Regiment In Uniform

Lt. Colonel Warren Adams commanded of the 1st South Carolina Infantry Regiment in defense of Battery Wagner at Charleston. He fended off the attacks of the African American 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry led by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. Attacked twice on July 11 and July 18, 1863, he repelled the Union forces with modest losses. Colonel Robert Gould Shaw was killed in the second assault on the fort. It eventually succumbed to siege when the Confederates abandoned it on the evening of September 6-7, 1863. The Battles of Battery Wagner are the source of the 1989 movie Glory. Adams went on to serve the 2nd South Carolina Cavalry and was shot from his saddle at the Battle of Bentonville in 1865.- He was the son of South Carolina Governor James Hopkins Adams and Jane Margaret Scott Adams.

  • Purchased from: Cowan’s Auctions, Cincinnati, Ohio, June 2015.
  • Forms part of: Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress).

Three unidentified soldiers in Union 1st Lieutenant, 1st Sergeant, and Master sergeant uniforms

[Three unidentified soldiers in Union 1st Lieutenant, 1st Sergeant, and Master sergeant uniforms]

[between 1861 and 1865] Ambrotype/Tintype filing series (Library of Congress) (DLC) 2010650518

Liljenquist Family collection (Library of Congress) (DLC) 2010650519

1 photograph : quarter-plate tintype, hand-colored ; 11.9 x 9.3 cm (case)

Private Albert H. Davis of Company K, 6th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment

In uniform, shoulder scales, and Hardee hat with Model 1841 Mississippi rifle, sword bayonet, knapsack with bedroll, canteen, and haversack. Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress).

Unidentified African American soldier in Union sergeant uniform holding a rifle.

“Once let the black man get upon his person the brass letters, U.S., let him get an eagle on his button, and a musket on his shoulder and bullets in his pockets, and there is no power on earth which can deny that he has earned the right to citizenship in the United States.” 
~Frederick Douglass 

These words spoken by Frederick Douglass moved many African-Americans to enlist in the Union Army and fight for their freedom. With President Abraham Lincoln’s issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1862, the Civil War became a war to save the union and to abolish slavery.

Approximately 180,000 African-Americans comprising 163 units served in the Union Army during the Civil War, and many more African-Americans served in the Union Navy. 

Twins Bartlett and John Ellsworth pictured with their brother Samuel. All three fought with Company A of the 12th New Hampshire Infantry. Three months after enlisting, Bartlett died from disease while serving in Potomac Creek, Virginia.

Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, Library of Congress