like it is relevant to mine

3

Things get broken, and sometimes they get repaired, and in most cases, you realize that no matter what gets damaged, life rearranges itself to compensate for your loss, sometimes wonderfully.

A Little Life, Hanya Yanagihara.  

you ever think about how scared ten was when he moved to korea after being offered a contract with sm as a trainee cause he didn’t know a word of korean and he doubted himself and his capacity to adapt and learn another culture for the sake of his dreams and didn’t know whether he would be able to debut without knowing this language and he was so terrified? but he had one boy who helped him so much throughout the whole process, and even though they’re in two completely different units and they don’t promote together, he’s still the one person that ten trusts the most. johnny is literally THAT person for ten. because he’s been there for him, through the ups and downs, he’s been there to teach and help him with his korean, he boosts his confidence and he’s ten’s rock. that’s why even when they do nct life or promo together their chemistry is so natural. their love is magical and pure and lasts several lifetimes and they’ll never find anyone else who will grow with them like they do with each other and god i am so lucky to be living at the same time as one of the greatest friendships, soulmates and love stories in the world.

anonymous asked:

i'm just like you! i literally go day by day on my horoscope lmao, but of course we'd be compatible i'm a taurus! I wish there was personalised ones tbh

Haha yes! Taurus are literally always my one true love. And do you mean like a personalised reading?? Cos you can get one of those here! It’s one of the best i’ve found online and although you have to say you’re over 35, all the signs and information is the same so it’ll all be still relevant if you’re not 35, you just need that for the life experience! Mine was scarily accurate, let me know what yours is like as well! 🔮

When a player asks “How many hitpoints does the monster have left?”

Originally posted by yourreactiongifs

“How many hit dice does it have?”

Originally posted by justalittletumblweed

“What’s it’s Damage Reduction?”

Originally posted by yourreactiongifs

Meta-gamey questions are a pet peeve of mine.  There are ways to get the information that are built into the game mechanics and don’t break character.  

Wanna know how hurt someone is?  Roll a Heal Check.

Wanna know if your spell is likely to affect a creature of this power level?  Roll Spellcraft.

Wanna know about the monster’s defenses?  Roll the relevant Knowledge Check.

Didn’t invest points into any of those skills?  Then you’re just gonna have to make an educated guess.

i was laughing with someone recently about “tumblr user unpr*tty” and this seems like a good time to remind people that there is literally no point in censoring yourself if you wanna talk shit because i can’t vanity search, if i try it’s nothing but tlc lyrics and a k-pop competition of some kind. this is also why you have to @ me if you wanna show me something and we’re not mutuals.

They told us Eurus, Redbeard, and Sherlock were all the same person in TAB

Do you remember the part where Sherlock drags his friends to Ricoletti’s grave and we think it’s real, but it’s actually mind palace?

The grave stone says “Emelia Ricoletti, Beloved Sister”

Sherlock jumps in and starts panting like a dog. He shovels dirt with his hands, digging like a hound with paws.

Sherlock is all three people.

“My husband is three people”

The Final Problem makes sense only in subtext. Whether you think it’s John’s MP or Sherlock’s MP, that’s still up for debate. I’m officially siding with Sherlock’s because there are flashbacks to the waterfall scene from TAB in TFP, which means both of those episodes must have been experienced by the same character, and I don’t think it was John for both.

Sherlock DID have a friend named Victor Trevor, but his death happened much later in Sherlock’s life. Because of that Sherlock took to hard drugs as a young adult, not as a child. There are two separate deaths he combined together to create TFP.

Redbeard was an imaginary friend. Sherlock didn’t have friends, we know this. He wanted to be a pirate – Mycroft remembers and misses that carefree child.

So what changed Sherlock’s mind? Why did the cold, logical, calculating machine take over and get rid of Sherlock’s imaginary friend?

Mycroft. He kept calling Sherlock “a stupid little boy”, saying “you always were so stupid”. Sherlock even says Mycroft thought he was an idiot. Sherlock stopped being “stupid” and tried to emulate his big brother – the only person in his life that would tolerate him. He tried solving the Carl Powers case and boom! Sherlock Holmes the little detective was born. This is why Mycroft brought up Redbeard at the wedding – “Hey, don’t get involved, remember when you had to resort to imaginary friends like a pathetic little child?” makes a lot more sense than “Hey, don’t get involved, remember your dead friend Victor who disappeared because our secret sister killed him?”.

Eurus represents the crushing logic that destroys everything Sherlock loves.

Because it’s happened before. Twice we’ve seen Sherlock’s mind explain how Victor died, we just didn’t know it.

Keep reading

Reasons Dean and Seamus totally got married after leaving Hogwarts
  • They were minor characters but the most noted thing about them was they were best friends
  • When Dean got the new chaser spot on the Quidditch team that Seamus wanted they stayed friends and had no conflict 
  • When Dean returned to Hogwarts to fight in the war Seamus roared with joy and hugged Dean
  • They’re always seen together even after the war like just casually talking to Aberforth Dumbledore, probably holding hands but Harry is the least observant person ever 
  • They were way closer to each other than anyone else
  • Seriously did they have any other friends besides the other
  • They’re pretty relevant characters but don’t have canon on marrying women
  • Seriously, Dean even has a biography on actually being a half blood and how his dad was a wizard and left him and his mum to protect them but really nothing on him getting married to some random witch? 
  • This tweet from Seamus’ actor 
Things I keep AND recommend you keep in a travel bag (For Autistics)

-Noise blocking headphones, Awesome when you have to sit around loud people and don’t want any noise

-Earbuds/Headphones, for listening to music or watching videos

-Tablet/Phone/Ipod If you have one, perfect for playing games or listening to music or watching videos

-Tangles, I use the Tangle Jr. but overall it’s awesome for fidgeting

-Chewey necklaces, I like to use the ones that look like normal jewelry, in case I’m around people that are rude when I stim

-Fidget Cube, I love these, easy to use in your pockets so you don’t have to deal with judgemental people

-Travel pecs book if you need it, I get pretty Non-Verbal in public, so this helps me tell people what I need/want. My travel pecs book is just smaller and only has things to do with traveling, so I have stuff in there like restaurants, stores, the food I want to eat etc. I also have it so I can change out the pecs that would be relevant to that trip.

-Stress ball, I have one that is shaped like an alien, so if you can find one that relates to your special interest that makes it even better

-Plastic baggie full of textured items, mine has things like fabrics, sandpaper, feathers, and straws 

-Something to do with your special interest, it can be a book, a stuffed animal, anything really

-Small bottles of scented oils, if I’m going out to eat it helps distract me from the other smells in the restaurant

And that’s about it, I use a pretty big bag that has a lot of room in it. Sometimes if I’m going to be gone overnight I also bring my weighted blanket and weighted stuffed dinosaur.

ORGANIZING YOUR GRIMOIRE (tips from a neat freak virgo)

okay i’ve been meaning to make this post for awhile bc i’ve seen some great ideas for grimoire organization, and i want to share the way i’m keeping track of all the pages in mine without worrying about the order in which i write them down

the trick: indexing. this is a technique lifted straight from bullet journaling. in fact, my grimoire has started to take form inside my regular bullet journal, so i’ve added a separate index page specifically for my witch-relevant content. this is cool because it’s like my grimoire is kind of hidden within a mundane exterior 👍🏻

here are the two steps:

1. number your pages as you go, and
2. add each page to your index as you write it

you could go further than this and add indices specifically for each type of content, like an index just for spell pages, an index for tarot pages, etc. - my preference is just to label each entry with a category so that they’re easier to skim. you can also add other signifiers like my asterisks to mark my own original content vs. information gathered from other sources. color coding would also work well here! and when you fill it up, you can either keep a couple pages at one place reserved for indexing, OR just start a new one on the next available page and enter it as the last line of your old index.

the reason i like this system is that it allows me to work in a fixed notebook where i can’t add pages (i really love notebooks), but frees me from my perfectionist fear of having information end up disorganized. it doesn’t bother me if pages on the same topic end up in different parts of the notebook because my index keeps them organized! i’m less likely to put off adding info until i know where it ‘should go’ so ultimately i end up being more productive, too.

i’m sure there are others who have similar setups but i thought some people might find this helpful 💕

anonymous asked:

I'm having trouble because I have a number of characters that I need to introduce pretty early on and I'm not sure how to do it without just having them all introduce themselves. None of them have ever met or heard of each other before the beginning of the story. Any advice?

Character Introductions

Greetings and salutations! We’re going to talk about character introductions, but before we do, I’m going to link two posts off the top of my head where we’ve discussed this before. Check out these two posts for some additional information if you’d like it. Regardless, I’m going to go in depth here on some great strategies for mass character introductions. 

Penney on Character Introductions

Rebekah on Two Characters Meeting for the First Time

Evaluate the Necessity of Each Introduction

Our anon mentioned that they needed to introduce all these characters pretty early on, but let’s stop and analyze that need for a moment. When you’re trying to decide if a particular event or detail is needed early on in your story, ask yourself the following question:

Do these characters (or facts/details) I’m introducing play a key role in the action of the beginning scenes? 

Make a list of your first few scenes (include brief summaries of the scenes), and look at who the key players are. Imagine you have a character that is being paid to steal something, and they’re in the process of stealing it. The conflict in the first scene is their success/failure to steal said object. The person who hired them to steal it is unimportant in this first scene. Yes, mention that your character was hired by someone to do this, and maybe hint at a general consequence if your character fails (”He’ll kill me if I fail”) but avoid an in depth description of this “boss character” and the nature of their relationship until later. The only thing that matters right now is whether or not your protagonist is able to steal this object.

Regardless of what happens in the first scene, your protagonist will need to return to this boss character and either give them the object they stole or inform them that they failed. This is the point where you start to describe this boss character - what they look like, what their demeanor is like, what they’re willing to do to make their point. It may be the point where you go into the backstory of your protag’s relationship with them, but it may not be needed even now. It may be that this backstory isn’t necessary to know until 2 or 3 scenes later on when we start to wonder why the hell our protagonist is putting up with this boss person’s insane orders and methods. 

The key point when it comes to exposition - make readers wonder about it before you tell them. Giving a reader all the information in the first chapter often results in a reader learning things they don’t even care to know yet.

So the first thing to do before you start introducing all your characters, is to decide which characters are involved in the actual events of the story in these early scenes. It’s likely that some of the characters need only a brief mention at this point (not a full intro), or perhaps even a postponed intro until a chapter or two later. 

In the case of our anon, none of their characters know each other, so it’s necessary here to ask yourself why they all need to meet at this particular point. Can Character A meet B in scene one, and then meet C, D, and E in scene three? 

If you feel like they all have to meet at once, because they’re all part of a group or something, then choose one or two relationships to focus on first. For example, when I start a new job, I take in everyone’s names at once but likely only remember a few, and the few I remember are because I end up talking or working with them 1-on-1 first. So decide if you’re able to generalize some of the introductions early on and focus on one or two character interactions early. It doesn’t mean those generalized intros are insignificant characters - it simply means we’ll get to them later when they become relevant. If this point seems valid to you, definitely read Penney’s post. 

Make Each Intro Significant and Memorable

I make this point in the post of mine I linked, but in this case, there’s a little more to it than what I discussed. When a character is meeting a lot of other characters, each introduction should include more than just “Hi, I’m Rebekah.” A detail should be included that we’ll remember, or something should happen that becomes significant. 

In Big Hero 6, Hiro meets four new characters in one scene (five if you include Callaghan). And each introduction includes not only a name (a nickname actually), but also showcases the area of science they each specialize in, because they’re each fussing with their projects as he moves through the room. Because he’s meeting them while they’re in the middle of work, we also see some characteristics about how they each operate (Wasabi getting upset when his “system” is disrupted by people grabbing his stuff). And rather than one big mass introduction, (”That’s Go-Go over there, and this here is Fred, and oh that guy over there is Wasabi”), Hiro meets each person individually, though still in one scene. These are formal introductions, but they work because they reveal something memorable and significant about each person, and it’s easier to keep track of them.

If this were a novel rather than a movie, this would also be a good place for Hiro to relate specific details about each person to his own life. If one of them reminded him of someone (whether it’s someone he knows, or a cross between two famous characters/celebrities), or if he’s initially intrigued or put-off by the character. For instance, Hiro later has an overflowing wastebasket full of discarded ideas, and this kind of mess might be something a super organized person like Wasabi might be driven insane by. So when they meet, Hiro might think something like, “Wow, if he’s frazzled by this kind of chaos, he better not set foot into my workshop.” I’ve exaggerated a bit, but I want to show an example of your opportunity as a novel writer versus a script writer. Pick on little details and show how the details affect the character that’s meeting them. 

Use Distinguishable Names and Create Associations

If at all possible, choose names for your characters that are easy to keep straight. Try to avoid having too many character names that start with the same letter, or have similar sounds to them. That’s no need to have a Danny D. and Danny C. situation here, or even an Ashley/Amber situation. You have control over your characters’ names, so pick names that are easily distinguished from the other characters’ names. 

Also, with a large cast, let readers form associations with a particular name that they won’t forget: 

  • “Noah was a ‘no-nonsense’ kind of guy.” 
  • “Shelley had a shrill laugh, and she was easily amused (and easily startled) so you heard it quite frequently, even across the room.”
  • “Ricky was the risk taker of the group. Not because he was brave or anything, but because he never thought things through.”

Let’s review:

  • Noah = no nonsense
  • Shelley = shrill
  • Ricky risky

These adjectives serve as subtle mnemonics that help to build associations between names and descriptors, and it’s the type of thing that a reader will remember without realizing that they’re remembering it. 

Mix and Match for Variety in Interactions

Depending on the type of point of view you are using, you may also have the opportunity to create smaller conversations within the larger group. You start the story with Ashley meeting Noah and Shelley, and you take the time to really show enough of who each character is that we’ll remember, and then you jump to a new scene where Danny is meeting Ricky. Once we’ve gotten used to this second group of characters, you bring all five together. Instead of being overwhelmed with all five characters at once, we’re spoon fed a little at a time so it’s less of an overload. 

And this example of 3 characters, then 2 characters isn’t an absolute. You can work with as many characters as you feel you can balance. If you’ve got a cast of, let’s say 12 characters, you might start the scene with a group of 5, and then a group of 3, and then a group of 4. The number of characters you’ll introduce at a time is in proportion to the cast as a whole. A bigger cast might mean bigger groups, or perhaps several smaller groups. This is where you play around with your specific setup to see what works. 

These are just some tips for introducing a large number of characters. Hopefully something in here will help you!

-Rebekah

HOW TO WRITE A STRONG ESSAY

I recently got an ask about how to write an introductory paragraph for an essay so I thought I’d do a post about how to write a good essay.

** Important Points ** For essays in high school, use third person unless the teacher specifically tells you not too. It’s more academic and professional while first person sounds really informal. I’ve heard that in college it’s different but again, it depends on the class. Stay on the safe side and use third person unless otherwise specified. Also, try to be as sophisticated and mature as you can. This makes the essay sound smarter and makes it easier to read.

1) INTRODUCTION

Try to think of an upside down pyramid here. You start off broad and end off tapered to a point (specific). The formula for writing a good intro is this: hook, background info, introduce topic of discussion, and thesis. In the pyramid example, the hook is the broad and the thesis is the narrow. The intro is usually around 8 sentences long.

  • Hook: Unlike what you’ve probably been told through out high school, the hook is not necessarily a wow statement. It’s typically a broad idea that relates to the topic of discussion. I usually use historical facts or common wisdom and go from there. I then follow it up with a sentence that elaborates on my hook and a sentence that connects my hook with the background info.
  • Background Info: Here you give the reader some context as to what you will be discussing in your essay. It sets the scene for the topic you’re discussing. Try to be concise.
  • Introduce the Topic of Discussion: Here you give a brief summary of the points you’re arguing/discussing. It should be one sentence per body paragraph and again, be clear and concise and avoid merely summarizing the plot. This part should cover the gist of your ideas.
  • Thesis: This should be a longer complex sentence that summarizes your point of view and ideas. This is one of the most important parts of the essay so crafting a good thesis is crucial.

I did a more detailed post about the introduction with an example introduction paragraph HERE.

2) BODY PARAGRAPHS

The meat of your essay. Here is where you state your arguments and defend them with supporting evidence from literature, articles, or even your personal experience. I would generally limit one argument per body paragraph. Which reminds me, most likely you have been taught the canned five paragraph essay. Some people write all their essays in five paragraph format because they thing that is the only way to go. Really, you can do four+ body paragraphs with the common numbers being four and six. It depends on the essay. When writing your body paragraph you need this structure: topic sentence, three points, three examples of supporting evidence, conclusion. Body paragraphs typically fall between 8 -15 sentences.

  • Topic Sentence: This is similar to a thesis. Here you’re stating the argument that you are proving in a clear and concise sentence.
  • Three Points: There’s a rule of thumb that you generally want to have three points about each argument and have a piece of supporting evidence for each point. I’m going to start with the three points first. Basically, you want three ideas about your argument that show why it’s valid. For example if you’re trying to argue that cheese is dairy, your three points are it’s made of milk, it’s featured in the dairy section of the grocery store, and the FDA labels it as dairy.
  • Three Examples of Supporting Evidence: These are usually quotes from other sources or the piece of literature you’re analyzing that support the three points of your argument. To use the really bad cheese example from above, for the milk point you’d use an ingredients label from a package of cheese, for the grocery store point you’d get a sheet with the department labels and the produce in those departments, and for the FDA point you’d find a quote from their website.
  • Conclusion: This is a sentence or two that wraps up your body paragraph. It should briefly summarize the points you discussed or the topic sentence and help transition into the next paragraph.

2) a. COUNTER ARGUMENT PARAGRAPHS 

This paragraph is NOT necessary for most essays. However, some do require them so it’s important to know how to approach them. Depending on whom you ask, they’ll either tell you that the counter argument paragraph goes in the middle of your body paragraphs, or at the end. Personally I prefer the end but the middle is more correct. Placing it in the middle allows you to end on a strong note but I think it’s a matter of personal preference. The counter argument is used to present an opposing view point and say why it’s wrong. This can strengthen your argument if it’s done properly but ruin it if it’s done wrong so tread carefully. The only thing different from the body paragraph structure is the topic sentence.

Topic Sentence: Here you need a specific template to start the paragraph properly. I usually use: It may be argued that _______________ but there is sufficient evidence to show that _______________. The first blank is filled with the opposing argument and the last blank is your argument. There are different ways to structure this sentence but this is the one I use.

The rest of the paragraph is the same as the body paragraph: you get three points as to why the counter argument is wrong and three points to support it. Then you end with a typical concluding sentence.

3) CONCLUSION

This is where you wrap up your arguments and finish strong. It has three components: a restatement of your thesis, summary of your arguments, and general statement to wrap it up. Think of the right side up pyramid this time. The pointy end is the thesis and the bottom is the general statement that closes your essay. A conclusion is typically 5 sentences long.

  • Restatement of Thesis: This is pretty self explanatory; you restate the thesis using different language than you used in your intro.
  • Summary of Arguments: Here you briefly touch upon the arguments you covered in your essay. Again, clear and concise, and whatever you do, DO NOT introduce new information. It can ruin the amazing essay you worked so hard on.
  • General Statement: A general statement is a broad idea that you use to tie your entire essay together. It’s kind of like the hook but should be more relevant to your essay.

And that is how you write a killer essay. I use this technique whenever I write and it has never failed me. Hopefully if will help you improve your writing! If you have any questions, feel free to hit up my ask box.