like crazy really

i may or may not have totally tweaked her face lol shh

Halloween 2016

4

He gave me 19 caps and then ascended to heaven. 

Jack at his panel:
  • jack: sorry i can't get off the stage, its against the rules
  • a person apart of the community: *cries*
  • a person apart of the community: *is really nervous*
  • a person apart of the community: *really wants a hug*
  • a person apart of the community: *and/or just really loves him for all he's done for us and is really overwhelmed*
  • a person apart of the community: *exists*
  • jack:
  • jack:
  • jack:
  • jack: ...
  • jack: FUCK THAT
  • jack: *jumps down to hug the person*
3

It seems that way, doesn’t it?

I can’t help but think that Jason is ridiculously strong. The kid was eleven and jacking tires. Not only that, but when he swung the tire jack at Bruce, Bruce doubled over. All the while, Jay is severely malnourished. 

This boy has the strength of a lion while living on the streets. Makes me wonder what he was like when he was healthy. He could probably push down pillars like a regular Samson.

tinkdw  asked:

I headcanon Ketch is all over 'alternative substances' ....

You know what, I think you’re right. But I don’t think his idea of a good time on drugs and DEAN’S idea of a good time on drugs is the same.

Dean is the “let’s split this joint and watch movies under some warm blankets and eat nachos” kind of dude

Ketch is the “let’s do cocaine off a stripper’s ass in the casino VIP lounge on a Tuesday afternoon” kind of dude

(Ketch is a thrill-seeking adrenaline junkie - motorcycle, tattoos, reckless awol missions/problem with authority, indiscriminate killing. Dean is not. Often they are poised as the same in canon, but their reasons for doing similar things are different, which I think would translate here as well.)

3

Satine Kryze in 3.05

Second character design for Dancing Knight Fever (The current name for the dancing rhythm rpg idea I’m conceptualizing). He’s the leader of a desert gang of dancing skeleton baddies that specialize in tango. Still want to refine his design but I’m enjoying his first pass. 

An anonymous asker wanted me to comment on a certain analysis of Dipper and Mabel’s relationship, encountered elsewhere on the Internet, which interpreted their bond as a destructive and unhealthy one. Anon shared the original analysis with me in full, but was kind enough to provide me with a point-by-point summation of the poster’s arguments, each of which I will address herein.

A) Mabel may learn lessons, but she easily forgets them later on and doesn’t actually tangibly change as a person and doesn’t actually learn anything as her behaviour is still roughly the same.

Mabel’s a more static character than her brother, I grant you that. Dipper’s the protagonist, and as such the character whose growth is the series focus; he’s an avatar of creator Alex Hirsch himself, so there’s a lot of gentle self-deprecation in the way he’s written. But I tend to think that, in terms of story, it makes sense for Mabel to maintain a certain childishness, because that part of her comes to a head during the Weirdmageddon arc, when she has to choose between eternal childhood and the hard reality of growing older.

Dipper himself doesn’t change much during the series; he learns various smaller lessons to the effect of “just let things happen and don’t try to rush them,” but, until the finale, fails to fully imbibe the larger lesson about growing up. The events of Weirdmageddon give us Dipper at his best; he sheds the pervasive need to be seen as an adult that has characterized him from the beginning and in so doing appears at his most mature. He becomes a realist. He stops getting in his own way. At the same time, Mabel relinquishes her selfishness, the world which revolves around her, and her unwillingness to move forward, even granting Dipper the freedom to stay with Ford if he so chooses. They each grow in a far more definite way than they did over the course of the series proper, in which their character flaws were excellent plot fodder. (It’s also worth noting that in the show, as in real life, maturation is a process; we tend to revert to type, and it’s rare that one definitive “lesson” alters our tendencies. We have to learn again and again.)

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