light-sheet-fluorescence-microscopy

3-Day Old Zebrafish Trigeminal Sensory Neurons

The trigeminal sensory neurons (the cells next to the eye) and their axons (the branches emanating from the cell bodies) are labeled by Brainbow transgenic expression. The axons of these sensory neurons extend into the brain (the horizontal bundle on the right side), where they encounter neurons within the brain. The color in the eye is due to tissue autofluorescence.

Image Courtesy: Albert Pan of Schier Lab.

source

Pancreatic Milky Way

By Jürgen Mayer, Centre for Genomic Regulation, Barcelona

Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (also known as SPIM) is a technique in which the only illuminated plane in a sample is the one being imaged, thus virtually eliminating background signal and drastically reducing the amount of light necessary to image the sample. As a result, this technique reduces photobleaching and phototoxic effects in live samples, allowing long-term imaging. Please enjoy the first of two Picture Shows in light sheet visualization: the first contains stunning still images, and the second will feature live-action movies. 

This image shows the complete gastric lobe of a murine pancreas. Blood vessels are labeled blue, insulin-producing β cells red, and glucagon-producing α cells green. The α and β cells are the major components of the Islets of Langerhans. Prior to imaging, the pancreatic tissue was chemically treated to make the sample optically transparent. The SPIM scan generates 3D data, a projection of which is shown in the photograph. Sample courtesy of Ulf Ahlgren, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

source

Pancreatic Milky Way By Jürgen Mayer, Centre for Genomic Regulation, Barcelona

This image shows the complete gastric lobe of a murine pancreas. Blood vessels are labeled blue, insulin-producing β cells red, and glucagon-producing α cells green. The α and β cells are the major components of the Islets of Langerhans. Prior to imaging, the pancreatic tissue was chemically treated to make the sample optically transparent. The SPIM scan generates 3D data, a projection of which is shown in the photograph. Sample courtesy of Ulf Ahlgren, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.This image shows the complete gastric lobe of a murine pancreas. Blood vessels are labeled blue, insulin-producing β cells red, and glucagon-producing α cells green. The α and β cells are the major components of the Islets of Langerhans. Prior to imaging, the pancreatic tissue was chemically treated to make the sample optically transparent. The SPIM scan generates 3D data, a projection of which is shown in the photograph. Sample courtesy of Ulf Ahlgren, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

2

A look inside the Head by Jim Swoger Centre for Genomic Regulation, Barcelona.

The head of an embryonic mouse at about 12.5 days postfertilization was fluorescently labeled to visualize neural and muscle precursor tissue, chemically treated to make it optically transparent, and scanned using SPIM to generate a 3D virtual reconstruction. A projection along the lateral axis of this virtual embryo is shown, in which color indicates increasing depth in the sample (green-blue, neurofilament; yellow-red, myoblasts). The native pigmentation of the eyes, imaged using OPT, is indicated in white.

(Pictures by http://www.cell.com/).

Sea Urchin Blastula

Purple Sea Urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) blastula with the perspective non-skeletogenic mesoderm labeled in red and green, the future endoderm in purple and the nuclear staining in blue. Images were taken during the EMBO-MAMED course 2013 by C. Andrikou and M. I. Arnone, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Italy.

Video

Source

3

Drosophila – adult brain with proboscis
Imaged with Lightsheet microscopy  ||  90 degree views, dual side illumination, size about 700 µm in length, maximum intensity projection.
Stained with fluorescent dyes.

Magenta: Proboscis Muscles  ||  Stain: Rhodamine phalloidin
Green: GFP-Neurons  ||  Stain: Alexa 488
Red: Neuroglian  ||  Stain: Alexa 647

Neuroglian is a cell surface transmembrane protein found on neuronal axons, but not cell bodies and on non-neuronal tissues.

SOURCE:  Flickr site of ZEISS Microscopy
Sample courtesy of Ali Asgar Bohra and Prof. K. Vijay Raghavan
National Center for Biological Sciences / NCBS, Bangalore, India.