light year anniversary

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Pharmakon  (Sacred Bones Records)

CONTACT Record Release Show

April 14, 2017  @brooklynbazaar

Love the drone sound!!

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50.Years Light by Emre Hanoğlu
Via Flickr:
www.instagram.com/emrehanoglu

Chance the Rapper & Donnie Trumpet Release “The First Time” In Light of ‘Surf’ One Year Anniversary

Last night, while most of the Western half of the world was asleep, Chance the Rapper, Donnie Trumpet and the rest of The Social Experiment celebrated the one year anniversary of their group’s debut album, Surf. The critically acclaimed project, which was released for free on iTunes was downloaded a whopping 618K times, and amassing over 10M downloads in its first week. As we all know by now, Chance is a true champion for the people, and is keen on making major changes in how music is delivered, even co-signing a fan-created petition to push the GRAMMYs into possibly recognizing and awarding music released on most platforms for free. To commemorate the one year occasion, Chance & Donnie dug into a vault of “unused Surf pieces” recorded during the original sessions. The result is a nearly 11-minute epic composition titled “The First Time” which features Chance The Rapper, Ady Suleiman, J.P. Floyd, Dustin Green and Cam Obi.

Made with SoundCloud
Tatsu Blog 01/21/2015: "Can't stop, won't stop."

“I’ve realized, yet once again, that people can’t seem to understand that this is a personal preference.

It’s getting to the point where I can’t laugh about it anymore.”

———-

I don’t want to dwell on it too much, but a part of me is thinking maybe he is being heckled about his smoking habit. Coming in light of Kiiyan’s one year anniversary of being smoke free, I can see people and fans being like “See Kiiyan did it.  You should try it too!” since these two have been chummy of late…

BUT I’M PROBABLY JUST OVER ANALYZING. 

Inktober day 7.  It’s so cute how Ladybug and Chat Noir do a fist bump after defeating and cleansing each akuma so with that idea in mind but wanting to try something different I drew them interlacing their fingers and giving a little celebratory jump.  I’ve wanted to try drawing a couple jumping up in the air for a while and this was a perfect opportunity to do it.

I drew this and inked it in traditionally with a red Sharpie fine point permanent marker and Papermate Flair Medium felt tip pen. But I colored their skin, eyes, (I love how Chat’s eyes came out, omg I love his beautiful green eyes! >w<) Chat Noir’s hair and the hearts, music notes, and lines of noise (I think that’s what they’re called?) digitally in PS plus I used Hue and Saturation to bring out the color in Ladybug’s suit and Chat Noir’s bell.

I’m soo grateful to miracurefladyblog.tumblr.com/C… for their references for Ladybug and Chat Noir’s suits! I wanted to make sure I was accurate with their suits when drawing this so this tumblr blog is a great help. :)

Attack The Light One Year Anniversary!

This weekend marks the One Year Anniversary of Attack The Light’s release! Wow!!

Looking back, we never anticipated our humble little RPG would be met with so much support and success. We are so so grateful to all our players and fans – all the kindness and enthusiasm we’ve experienced this past year have been the most incredible motivator to do bigger and even better things. Thank you so much to you all, from our entire team! (And of course, a huge huge thank you to our good friends at CN, and the lovely and brilliant SU team for making it all possible!)

Now that we’ve released our newest game, Powerpuff Girls: Flipped Out!, we’ve got s'more very exciting things in the works, including another new 2016 game release to announce in the next few weeks (yes, *already*! –- told ya we’ve been busy!), and then yet another project after that that’s currently in pre-production and willl certainly make ATL fans very excited! Can’t wait to tell you more!

Cheers, all!

~ Team Grumpy

@cartoonnetwork @stevencrewniverse

5 August: On this day in 1966, The Beatles’ album Revolver was released.
Cover design by Klaus Voormann.

Revolver was accepted well. I don’t see too much difference between Rubber Soul and Revolver. To me, they could be Volume One and Volume Two.” - George Harrison, The Beatles Anthology

“We were really starting to find ourselves in the studio. We were finding what we could do, just being the four of us and playing our instruments. […] We were really hard workers. That was another thing about The Beatles - we worked like dogs to get it right.” - Ringo Starr, The Beatles Anthology

Listen to the full album - which includes the first backwards guitar solo (on “I’m Only Sleeping”) - online via YouTube here.

Happy three years of enjoying life together to the three most important people in the entire solar system, Beau, Lights, and Rocket Bokan. May they continue to float through time and space together for the rest of their unknown amount of time on earth.♥

J. Cole: Portrait of a Rap Superhero

In J. Cole’s early days, he used a lot of basketball metaphors to describe how he broke into the rap game. The Come Up. The Warm Up. Friday Night Lights. The Sideline Story. When Cole announced the third installment of his Dollar and a Dream Tour — the title of which stems from a song about chasing a better future throughout the struggle — you could almost feel the energy of his fans through their Twitter and Instagram accounts. Like previous editions, the tour was impromptu — where things like a random flyer to fans are currency for a coveted wristband. Oh yes, and a dollar must be paid as well. This time around, the news swept like wildfire, despite once again arriving at a moment’s notice. Keeping his tradition of playing back old material in full, the 30-year-old rapper revisited Friday Night Lights, nearing its five-year anniversary on November 12. However, all superstardom aside, not a lot has changed. Nearly five years later, the 25-year-old Cole versus the 30-year-old Cole of today is practically the same. Both are extremely appreciative of their fans and have produced top-notch projects in a climate where rappers are constantly proving their worth. Both also wanted to create a moment to remember — Friday Night Lights was an OG surprise release, while 2014 Forest Hills Drive sold 354,000 copies in its first week and debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200. Cole is nearly done with his Dollar and a Dream Tour. He’s hit Dallas, New York City and Atlanta already. His last stop is tomorrow in Los Angeles. Each stop was pandemonium. Once again, if you don’t know the logistics behind getting in, here they are: he announces the location, time and day of the show, it costs $1 to get in, and it’s a first come, first serve for a chance to see the favorite rapper. To keep it real, this whole idea is brilliant. In today’s hip hop climate, it’s rare that someone is so invested in pleasing their fanbase — specifically, day one fans who have been there throughout your whole career. It’s that same fan who can rap every word to “Villlematic” and not lose their breath. The fan who buys “Dollar and a Dream” gear and rocks it throughout the whole concert. The fan who sticks around after it’s over to get an autograph. The fan who can watch their favorite rapper rock a stage in a sold-out venue, yet also march for injustice. That’s a balance few have struck; a balance few care to. The point is that Cole is the quintessential rapper of 2015. And it’s not just the quality of music or his dedication to his fans; it’s the efforts outside of music that also make him so great and vital to the current rap landscape. It’s a time where it truly is bigger than hip hop. I attended J. Cole’s show at Irving Plaza strictly as a fan. During my college years, I played Friday Night Lights a lot among my rotation of Curren$y’s This Ain’t No Mixtape and Drake’s So Far Gone. My inner stan was jumping inside at the thought of hearing my favorites like “Higher,” “Premeditated Murder” and “The Autograph.” After his Dreamville boys (Omen, Cozz and Bas) warmed up the excited crowd, the chants for J. Cole were deafening. Inside an intimate venue like Irving — where fans packed the bottom floor and huddled up against the balconies upstairs — the atmosphere was different from any regular shows there. This was for us, the fans, and he was well aware of that. “Close to five years ago…we dropped this bomb on the world called Friday Night Lights,” he would say later that night. “We came to do this s**t tonight. I really wanna know who know this word for word.” Everyone did, because the thing about Cole is that he’s always giving back, so we return with his lyrics in gratitude. From his earliest days as a native of small town Fayetteville (Cole’s humble beginnings) to laying the foundation for his Dreamville brand in NYC to finally landing that Roc Nation deal and getting a Jay Z co-sign, Cole’s is a narrative we can all relate to. His past isn’t littered with stories of struggling in the streets, but rather a passion to create a better life and spread his Nas-inspired raps to the world. As his voice gets louder, we continue to value his messages, no matter how big or small the gesture is. Just in the past year alone, Cole has visited the protests in Ferguson over the death of Michael Brown and performed his moving tribute “Be Free” on Late Night With David Letterman. His childhood home, which is also the title of his latest album 2014 Forest Hills Drive, houses single mothers rent-free. “My goal is to have that be a haven for families,” he said in an interview with Combat Jack. “Every two years a new family will come in, they live rent-free.” If that wasn’t enough, during his promotional run of 2014 Forest Hills Drive, he hosted private listenings at his home to give fans a personal experience because he really wanted to connect with them. Some even received one-on-one time, where Cole went to their home and hung out. He keeps his promises, too, recently attending a fan’s high school graduation after becoming inspired by her open letter about academic hardships. All he asked was for her to get into a four-year university. She delivered and he came through with the most life-changing gift ever. The thing about Cole is that his basketball metaphors meant something more than a cool merger of rap and sports. He’s like a Russell Westbrook or a Chris Paul — an MVP who gets nothing but love from his community and is constantly reciprocating that support. And all it took was a dollar and a dream. We hope 10 years from now Cole is still rapping and still giving back to the people who made him who he is today.

Source: bet.com 

title: cherry blossoms
rating: k
summary: Above them, pink petals fell like kisses. Kagome’s hand lifted to catch them, and a great, peaceful sigh left her lips. Inuyasha watched, finding it very difficult to breathe.
author’s note: this is for day two of inukag week. I was inspired by the color pink (it’s my favorite ok) more than by the theme of care, but hey! all love is essentially caring for someone, right? and yes, I had to include the picture, okay???

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