light rim

Things that took me way too long to learn about colour theory

-colours are nothing but RELATIVE
-neutral backgrounds. NEUTRAL BACKGROUNDS. they make your colours pop because COLOUR. RELATIVITY. 
-rim light are a cheat sheet for making awe-worthy art
-on that note, DON’T DROWN YOUR DRAWINGS IN RIM LIGHT. LESS IS MORE.
-light purple + ‘multiply’ = BEAUTIFUL SHADOWS
-hell any light colour + ‘multiply’ = bam you have atmospheric shadows 
-orange/yellow light + blue/purple shadows (because our instinctual reference for light… is the sun. which is yellow/orange. and blah blah blah something light physics blah blah it makes the shadows the opposite colour, so opposite of yellow/orange sunlight is purple/blue shadows). I mean it’s a nice default but it’s not set-in-stone and other colour palettes add mood so GO ON WITH YOUR COOL LIGHTS AND WARM SHADOWS

(cont. if people are interested)

Tips for Illustrators (and other artists too!)

I’m an illustration major at MICA (please check out my blog here as a way to support me for making this post!), so this is catered towards what I learned in my illustration critiques and from professional illustrators. I think these tips can go for other artists too, though!

None of these are things that work all the time, but they’re general “rules” I’ve been taught. You can break them, just know why you’re doing so! These are just things I copied from my critique notes, so most are general tips I’ve heard and copied down.

General

  • Enjoy what you’re working on, but be okay with changing it.
  • Anatomy, and accurately trying to portray it, is really important.
  • Time and space can be portrayed through focus and distance.
  • When working digitally, make some of your own textures (traditionally) and scan them in. Adding them into a picture adds an element of your own hand and makes your work stand apart from other digital work.
  • Contrast is a great thing.
  • Saturation is a great thing, especially in watercolor (soak that brush with pigment!).
  • Your style should never draw an obscene amount of attention to itself; it should just work fluidly.
  • Consider what medium(s) work best for your idea.
  • Cover your paint palettes (particularly reusable ones) to make sure dust doesn’t get in the paints.
  • Spin the page when you’re working. The time is takes to do that will show some major improvement in your art!
  • Use dark watercolor and then a light colored pencil on top, never the other way around (it will look muddy and ruin clarity).
  • Make sure to sometime pin or place you piece far away and step away so you can see the whole composition (or zoom out a lot digitally).
  • Consider the genre and audience of what you’re working for (and if it’s yourself, then you’re your own audience!).
  • Illustration is a branch of fine art, don’t forget that.
  • Fantasy art usually needs a lot of high detail.

Coloring

  • Pick an overall color palette to work in, then add in other colors as needed.
  • Complementary colors (ones opposite on the color wheel), when placed next to each other, can pop an object forward or draw attention to it. (Think of a red ornament on a green Christmas tree).
  • Designate the shadows to be either warm or cool, and the highlights to be the opposite. Stay with this throughout the entire picture.
  • All colors have a warm and a cool hue (cool and warm blues, cool and warm oranges).
  • The more saturated a color is, the more it will pop forward in the picture plane.
  • Don’t use colors right out of the paint tube.
  • When making a shadow, tint the color with the complementary tone (it makes it a little more grey).
  • Colorizing backgrounds lines makes them recede in a colored image with line art.
  • Blue and pink tones are great for use in skin tones.
  • Flats need to be fairly differentiated colors.

Drawing

  • The reference should never be an excuse for a misleading or awkward pose. You have the artistic license to alter an awkward pose and not just draw from a photo.
  • With scratchy or textured line art, find some places of solid black too, to allow the eye to rest (or where you want something to pop out).
  • How you render all the elements of the picture is what makes your own individual style.
  • When something is illuminated, it should be the brightest part of the composition.
  • Anything with a straight angle (like the corner of a room) has one wall/side being lighter in value than the other. There is a crisp distinction.
  • Sometimes adding more lessens the strength of the image.
  • Fabric folds are crisp, if they’re too soft they’ll look like clay.
  • Line heaviness and weight can determine depth.

Anatomy/Characters

  • Anatomical consistency is very important.
  • Inside of the mouth is usually dark.
  • Show character motivations with actions and poses.
  • You can crop a face or figure to set a mood.
  • In any and every picture, pay special and close attention to the hands, feet, and face.
  • Learning musculature, even if you use reference, will help you create the body you want for your character. Understand the human form…it’s easier to alter if you understand it in the first place.
  • To pop a figure forward, add a little bit of rim lighting (great with backlighting).

Composition

  • Avoid spots where a line or shape comes really close, but doesn’t cross, the edge of the paper. This is called a tangent and tangents are bad (they suck the eye into just that one spot and stop the composition).
  • Nothing in the picture is accidentally there, it is all drawn by you, so make sure everything has a conscious placement.
  • Don’t crop anything that shows essential character expression (including essential parts of the pose).
  • Never crop a figure at a joint (it makes the limb look amputated unintentionally).
  • Consider how you show detail with smaller characters…what are the essential characteristics?
  • Shapes of color or tone can make great framing devices.
  • For the most part, render the foreground with more clarity than the background…you want atmospheric perspective to be used to make it look like it’s receding.
  • Line heaviness/weight can combat (in a good way) any very dark areas.
  • When the character breaks a border (shape, line, panel etc), it shows dominance.
  • Make the shape of your negative space visually interesting.
  • “Cornerstops” are great. They are a compositional element that visually blocks your eye from running off the corner of a page.
  • Shadows can be a great compositional element.

Narrative Illustration (Portraying the narrative)

  • It is a successful illustration if the story is told.
  • Use every element of the image to tell the story.
  • Sometimes you have to take out elements you love for the sake of storytelling.
  • Think of images as being fast/slow, quiet/loud. What techniques portray these senses for you, and why are you using such techniques? What areas of the picture are slower and faster, why those areas?
  • Indicate how lavish or simple a place is by the details you choose to include in the background.
  • Don’t make it obvious that you “curated” the picture; it should look natural.
  • Cover illustrations don’t always need big and bold text, as long as there’s a strong narrative being portrayed.
  • Something mid action carries the narrative better than pre or post action.
  • You should be able to tell a story without relying on text.

Sequential Art (Comics, etc)

  • Color between panels can draw the eye around the page.
  • Big jumps in narrative can add humor and excitement, just make sure to think of why you are having the jump there.
  • When starting a sequence, make it obvious where you start (establishing shot; biggest to smallest, etc).
  • Make sure panels can read as separate images even if you took the gutter away.
  • Smaller panels are frequently used for faster/quicker actions.
  • Removing the background in certain panels allows the scene to be read faster; you only need one background per page (unless the scene in the background is changing).
  • Style, readability, and timing are key things to keep in mind.
  • Does the punch line/climax happen at the right time on the page?
  • Before planning a page, ask yourself: “How much time is elapsing between the first and last panel?”
  • Consider panel shape and size.
  • The composition, and where the eye flows inside every panel, informs where the eye travels to next…compositionally lead the eye from panel to panel.
  • The more panels you have, generally the more time goes on.
  • Don’t rely on speed/action lines to make things dramatic.
  • Give word bubbles a little breathing room.
  • When doing a graphic novel, you’ll usually have to redraw the first few pages since the characters will come more naturally to you by the end pages.
  • There is a design element to sound effects.

Digital Art (Mostly Photoshop based, but some are general tips)

  • Before printing, you usually want to switch your file to CMYK (though save a file in RGB too). Print at 300 dpi.
  • Before printing, you can up the brightness, saturation and contrast until it just starts to look awkward. You’ll learn the best settings for the printer you print at.
  • Don’t place digital textures anywhere. Consciously arrange them.
  • Don’t overrender. Digital art tends to be the most successful when it feels less digital than someone would expect.
  • If your color scheme doesn’t look cohesive, you can use a fill layer of one specific color to unify everything (Layer->fill layer). Lower the opacity to around 15-30%.
10

I’ve spent the past few months attempting to figure out a framework for Ghost Physics in the Danny Phantom universe? Enjoy my crazed scribblings.

Cliff notes version: The Ghost Zone is our dimension’s 4D “atmosphere,” absorbing harmful trans-dimensional radiation. Ghosts are made of the Ghost Zone’s version of matter, called ectoplasm, a substance capable of 4D motion (video explanation of that), “toggling” how physical forces (esp. electromagnetism and gravity) interact with it, and storing huge amounts of energy. A ghost’s unique nervous system and encoded body plan (the ecto-signature) remains in the upper energy levels of the Ghost Zone at all times, remotely controlling their body. Danny can chemically change his body between ectoplasm and regular matter, and has both a normal physical brain and an ecto-signature.

A Literal Essay:

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Oh my stars your art is amazing!!! Do you think maybe you can make a shading tutorial sheet? owo

Hey there Anon! Sure thing! I’ll do my best to explain the process of how I usually do things in regards to coloring and shading. I’m not the greatest at Explaining, so I’ll do my best to keep things as crystal clear as possible!

Step 1: Lineart
I’ll start with Lineart purely because this step is important to the coloring process in one regard, and that is making sure the entire line layer is closed without any holes. Even the smallest little gap will make the selection process hard later, and we don’t want that. So the cleaner lineart you have, the better. I’m going to go ahead and use my Monster Hunter Generations Huntress for this.

Step 2: Selection
Either in Photoshop or SAI or whatever you use, click outside your character and any other negative space surrounding them. This means…basically anything that’s not your character. Then go to Selection > Inverse and invert the selection. You should have something similar to what I have below. This makes it so much easier to add colors without having to worry about all the little nooks and crannies that could mess the cleanliness of the drawing up real bad.

Step 3: Flat Base
Create a new layer beneath your line layer with the selection still active. This will be our color layer. Remove the visibility of the line layer, and fill the remaining “Silhouette” with a dark base color. This makes those nasty corners look a bit cleaner, as sometimes if there is a lighter color your computer will want to make them stand out pixelated. Again, this is just for cleanliness beneath the line layer. Turn your line layer back on, as they will now act as barriers for the fill bucket tool. Make sure the entire silhouette is filled, and that no lines were accidentally selected! You want a see a completely filled and flat color if you turn the line layer off.

Step 4: Flat Colors
At this point you can lock the transparency of your Color Layer, and go ham. Either with the pen or a fill bucket, figure out how you want to color your character and add in the flat colors. Notice I’m on the same layer as the Base that we made. This is so those lines still play nicely with one another. Clean up where necessary.

Step 5: Analogous Color Gradient
Well, we don’t really want our character to be too flat, do we? This is where the color wheel becomes your best friend. Select similar colors with the Magic Wand (like I’ve done her skin tone here) and using the color wheel, choose an analogous (that means “close by” in color wheel terms) color to add a bit of depth to the color. For skin, I usually go with a red or a bronze, sometimes purple. Use the airbrush for this. Then, deselect and select another color to gradient, until all the colors have some degree of new color to them.

See? Now things look interesting! We added some blue to the greens, some purples to the reds, some blues to the grays and so on and so forth.

Step 6: Shading
Okay, here’s where things get interesting. Time to shade. Make a new layer between the Line Layer and Color Layer, and make sure you make it a clipping group/clipping mask. This is so it won’t go anywhere that you don’t have color. Set it to multiply or linear burn (whichever you think looks best) and bump the opacity down to about 40-50%. Choose a color (or color-value gradient, if you have drastic value changes in your piece that make light and dark values not play well with the single color you picked, and swap between those) that you want the shadows to be; I like deep pinks and purples. AVOID BLACK. I first use the Pen tool to get down “hard” shadows - shadows cast by hard materials, close shadows, and inorganic materials. Once I’ve got those down, I head on over to the softer areas, such as the skin, hair and cloth and alternate between the watercolor and marker tools to give “softer” shadows. There’s no real law to this, you just have to know where shadows fall and how they behave and  work with those three tools to get the look you want.

Step 7: “Highlights” - Rim Lighting
Okay, these aren’t really “highlights” in the correct sense, but adding sort of “rim lighting” around forms really helps make a picture pop. To do this, make another layer above the shading layer, set it to “screen” and keep the opacity at 100%. Then, get really familiar with your CRTL key because you’re going to be color sourcing a lot. To add a rim light to a form, select the base color of that form, and use the marker to trace along the edges. For example, I picked up the nude from the skin, the silver from the dagger, the gold and maroon from the hair and the tawny brown from the skull to use on those specific objects. Any place you want clean works well, but the edges of forms works best for this technique. Additionally, if you’d like, you can create another layer above the Screen Layer and set it to Linear Dogde, and do my “glowing eyes” technique on anything you want to stand out, such as the metal of the belt, gold objects and of course, eyes.

Step 8: The Overlay
Almost done! While your photo can now stand alone as “finished”, there’s one more thing that I enjoy doing, and that’s adding a simple color overlay to bring the whole picture together. This is done by flattening all the layers you have so far (you’ll want to “Merge Down” in order from bottom to top or “Flatten” to avoid the layers going crazy on each other) into one layer. Then, make a layer on top of that one, set it to a clipping mask, and set it to “overlay”. With the Airbrush, choose some colors (I prefer soft pinks, blues and violets) and go along the “edges” of your character with a BIIIIIG brush. This kind of resembles soft ambient lighting or shadows. I just think it makes the photo look nicer.

TA-DA! And Now we’re done!

And there we go! I hope that helped, and I also apologize cause this ask sat in my box for awhile and I never got around to it until now. :P
I’d be happy to answer any questions y’all have, but this is the simple basics! Remember to practice practice PRACTICE!
-Gael

My creative energy is a fickle, fickle monster, apparently, and today it has decided to bless me. Or curse me I’m not sure

@miraculousfluffmonth Day 8: New. 

“The new intern at Father’s company… well, he’d mentioned her being in school, but I hadn’t imagined her being around my age. Do you think I could… befriend her?”

-Adrien to the butterflies as he hurriedly changes into regular clothes to go make a good impression, probably

4

stylized fur tutorial. thanks for the question! i’ve been getting quite a few requests regarding how i paint fur, but honestly even i don’t have a set procedure for it yet orz

still i thought i would take a few moments to randomly blob out a clump of fur just to see for myself what techniques i’m using right now. so for brushes, i generally like using the watercolour ones. i have two atm, one set to a larger min. diameter (with high ease of mixing), and another set to a smaller min diameter (with low ease of mixing and high load colour).

  • (1) i use the smaller brush first to sketch in the general fur shapes, they’re pretty big at this stage, we’ll be adding in smaller clumps later
  • (2 - 3) using the larger watercolour brush now, i blob in a few shadows - keeping in mind the light source. i then select a lighter colour and make the brush smaller to make the definition between the light and shade sharper.
  • (4 - 7) now i take out the smaller brush again and refine the edges and points! i also use it to quickly add extra tufts of fur and then i’ll switch back to the larger brush to blend the new tufts in. and i basically keep doing this until i’m satisfied with the level of detail.
  • (8) i adjusted the levels to make the contrast higher. you can do this to make the character blend into whatever environment you’re painting them in.
  • (9) added colour with an overlay layer! although tbh i usually paint in colour to begin with in most of my drawings. but overlay/add layers are still super helpful for creating nice lighting effects and interest! you can add highlights and rim lighting at this stage too~

hope this was helpful!

probs done a thousand times already but I just watched Pacific Rim again and I had to

@miraculousfluffmonth day 31: I’m yours, forever

“Forever?”

“Forever.” 

(And they lived happily ever after)


Anyway this month was super fun but I think the most important lesson I learned is that art takes up a lot of time if you let it lol. But again, all in good fun!

How I color (since people asked)

You must first understand that lighting interacting with different surfaces in different ways. This is for skin and other materials with sub surface scattering. 

Skin has 5 or 6 parts to the lighting depending on if you want to include bloom or not. 

Select an area within your outlines and fill for the base color. This color should look fairly drab. It should never appear too bright, too saturated or be pure black either. It should never be 0 saturation, but it should never be high saturation, either. 

Sub Surface Scattering(also called SSS) is when light penetrates an area on the inside which shows a second color inside. For a stylized look I like to make this color a brighter and higher saturation than the base color.  In skin this second color is pink or red because of the flesh, however it can be any color. In the case of eyes it’s blue, green, yellow or red. Use an normal or overlay layer at any opacity. Do not use multiply or luminosity. 

SSS can sometimes appear as an area of high saturation along the edge of a shadow. 

For the Diffuse lighting I then use a luminosity layer on 50 opacity. Use the eyedropper to select the base color. If your lighting has a color shift your base color a bit in the direction of that color on the color wheel. Color the area getting direct lighting with the water brush. the water brush can be use to make both blurry or unblurred strokes.  Also include the rim light, which is on the opposite side of the main light.

Use the water brush and select the base color to paint the shadow  on a multiply layer at about 50 opacity. If you are painting realistically you should use near black or gray, but if you are painting cartoony you should shift your color wheel over to be a tiny bit more purple or blue. Do not make everything extreamly blurry because this is a really fast way to make your drawing look supper crappy. This is why I like to include soft and hard edges to my shadows. 

There is also a rule that the father away the shadow is being cast from the more blurry it will appear.

On a luminosity layer at  fully opacity paint the specular highlight with a pen brush. Use either white or whatever color your light source is. Then use the airbrush to paint the fuzzy bloom around it. Sometimes I use the water brush, too. 

If you want your artwork to have outlines, this is the point I color the black outlines. Click the preserve opacity box which is above the layer stack. Then use the eye dropper to select the darkest color of the object you are filling, or you could pick a lighter color to define its shape. It really depends on what color makes your object stand out the best. Color it in and you have your cartoon outlines. 

@iveseenthetruth

Finally had some time to make this! I fell in love with the description of Ani in ‘Horizon Light’ by @glare-gryphon so this is my own personal interpretation. I’m actually not sure if there has been a description of his hair yet, but I just went with the mohawk haircut that I sometimes see in pictures of Hayden as I felt it fit well into this AU!

Not from any particular moment from the fic, just a general illustration. Also please note my hashed-together mech arm design, which is a bastardisation combination of Anakin’s actual mech arm from RoTS and the jaeger arm design of Gipsy Danger in Pacific Rim. 👍

Small doodle I made whilst listening to the TAZ Finale!

Kind of maybe part of a vague fairy tale AU I have going on, but I mostly wanted to mess around with tonality and PS brushes and stuff. So here.