light into dark

‘Twin Peaks’ Recap: Pretty Hate Machine

What is clear is the birth of Bob’s bracing message. This disturbing, disorienting episode explicitly ties the demon’s creation to the atom bomb’s detonation, an act of man that rivals, or betters, the dark deeds of any religion’s devil. The connection is no accident. Nor is it without precedent: Ever since the original Twin Peaks introduced supernatural horror into its director’s body of work, the link between otherworldly evil and real-world brutality has been a constant. Lynch treats human cruelty like a rupture in the fabric of reality through which demons of every shape and size can enter — think Lost Highway’s white-faced Mystery Man, Mulholland Drive’s monstrous dumpster-dweller and gibbering old folks, Inland Empire’s balloon-faced Phantom and, of course, the dwellers of the Black Lodge. They all  feed on and perpetuate the cycle of violence that enabled their emergence.

Some experiences and emotions are so cataclysmic that our everyday imagery and vocabulary cannot possibly do them justice; monsters give shape to those feelings, the same way an aria in an opera or a song in a musical gives human passion a voice. In crafting creatures like that denim-clad monster and his dark brethren, Lynch is doing what all great horror does. He’s taking the agony and fear we already feel and, like Dr. Frankenstein in his lightning-streaked laboratory, bringing it to unholy life. The real question this episode asks, then, is no more or less than the one pilot Robert A. Lewis asked when he dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima: “My God, what have we done?”

I reviewed last night’s Twin Peaks, the most artistically ambitious episode of television I’ve ever seen, for Rolling Stone.

3

Villa Necchi Campiglio, Milan 

Part II 

One of the single family ‘House Museums in Milano’, designed by architect Piero Portaluppi (1932 - 1935) for the Necchi family. The architectural & interior design style is based on Italian Rationalism and reflects the exclusive, wealthy lifestyle of the family. Each room has a distinct color palette and the overall decor whispers everything vintage and Italian luxury.

Your mindset can make or break you. If you believe something to be bad, then it will simply be bad. However, if you make a point of looking for the light amidst the darkness, it can turn your whole world into one filled with beauty.
—  Nicole Addison @thepowerwithin