library sci

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Jules Verne (8 February 1828 – 24 March 1905) 

French novelist, poet, and playwright best known for his adventure novels and his profound influence on the literary genre of science fiction. (Wikipedia)

From our stacks: Cover and spine detail from The Fur Country; Or, Seventy Degrees North Latitude. Translated from the French of Jules verne. By N. D’Anvers. With One Hundred Illustrations. Boston: James R. Osgood and Company, 1874. 

“All of the books in the world contain no more information than is broadcast as video in a single large American city in a single year. Not all bits have equal value.”
– Carl Sagan

Critical thinking and the daily practice of routine, healthy skepticism are just as pertinent to the exploration of knowledge archived in libraries as is required while perusing the internet. It’s necessary to understand this before embarking on ones personal journey of curiosity so to not be led astray from truth by charlatans whose motive is to deceive or dissuade from the evidence counter to their end goal.

An understanding of how the natural world works – underpinned by physical laws – bolsters ones awareness of the environment responsible for the existence of the mechanisms of the universe itself. This disciplined commitment of intellectual honesty is the safeguard against others – individual or collective – whom forgo dignity and integrity toward personal gain; or the influence of some special (corrupt) interests, fueled by a strategy of manipulation to engage, captivate, and exploit the ignorance of others.

We live amidst a jungle of entrapment and wonder. Navigating through the brush and recognizing the traps set before us are key to our survival as well as our ability to learn more about the world with which the jungle thrives.

The other day I was really spaced out in my english class bc I haven’t really been sleeping enough, and a guy was calmly reading something he had written for class when he screamed “FUCK” as loudly as he could. I love my classmates, I never stay bored for long. 

April 7, 2016 // [3/100

I’ve been taking a break from my regular/required/real schoolwork and attending a conference on campus about voting/collective decision-making. The conference has been fascinating – in my four years, one of the most academically inspiring events I’ve partaken in; I feel reaffirmed in my hopes about grad school. Anyways, it all took place in this warm room in the Quadrangle Club.

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23/10/16

So woke up this morning to find the house totally out of power and the burglar alarm stuck on, so took refuge with one of my housemates in the library until the landlord had everything fixed. Ended up getting tons of work done, and now have made Sunday Library Study a regular thing- spent today revising for my Algebra and Combinatorics exam tomorrow, wish me luck!!

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Analog Science Fiction and Fact is the longest running continuously published science fiction magazine. The magazine began in 1930 as the famous pulp Astounding Stories. It underwent several name changes over the years; during the 1960′s it’s name was changed to Analog Science Fact & Fiction, and in 1992 it’s name shifted to it’s current iteration: Analog Science Fiction and Fact. This publication has survived through decades of changing tastes, cultural climates, and economies.  Born in the golden age of the pulps, it carried on through the decline of pulp fiction and the rise of digest/paperback formats, and is still going strong today. Analog Science Fiction and Fact published issue no. 1,000 in June of this year.  

Analog Science Fiction Science Fact. Ed. John W. Campbell. Assistant Ed. Kay Tarrant. Vol.LXXIX, No.6, August 1967. New York. Cover by Chesley Bonestell. 

Analog Science Fiction Science Fact. Ed. John W. Campbell. Assistant Ed. Kay Tarrant.  Vol. LXXX, No.4, December 1967.  New York.  Cover by John Schoenherr.

Analog Science Fiction Science Fact. Ed. John W. Campbell. Assistant Ed. Kay Tarrant. Vol. LXXXII, No. 1, September 1968.  New York.  Cover by John Schoenherr.

Analog Science Fiction Science Fact. Ed. John W. Campbell. Assistant Ed. Kay Tarrant. Vol. LXXXIII, No.3, May 1969.  New York.  Cover by Kelly Freas.  

Analog Science Fiction Science Fact. Ed. John W. Campbell. Assistant Ed. Kay Tarrant. Vol. LXXXIV, No. 4, December 1969. New York. Cover by Kelly Freas. 

-Laura H. 

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Here we have Vol. I, Issue I of Scorpio, published in L.A. in March 1941.  The cover is an example of white-on-black printing–hard to photograph yet awesome to behold.  We have numerous zines with white-on-black covers within the Hevelin Collection.  See some other examples here and here.

Scorpio. Vol.I, Issue I.  California: an Astra publication.  Edited by Alojo. Cover by Barnes. Interior illustrations by O’Brien, Moyer, and Chamberlain. The Rusty Hevelin Science Fiction Collection.    

-Laura H.