library is now open

Witch eLibrary

I’ve been working on getting as many PDFs of good books as I can so I can read and research with books I don’t already own. I’ve created a Google Drive that I upload them to (I also have a personal library, I’ll share that as well) that is now open for public viewing. I’ve downloaded many of these from posts floating around here as well as different sites I use for witchy stuff (thank you all, btw). I figured that if anybody else needs them, they’ll all be compiled in this library for the people who can’t physically buy the books. You can find this library here and my personal library that’s still in construction here. My personal selection included much of Plato, Henry David Thoreau, and Ralph Waldo Emerson if anyone wants to dip into it. Also, if anyone has anything to add (more books are definitely welcome), any names of authors for the books in the Unknown Authors folder, or any other feedback for this library, don’t hesitate. My ask box is always open. c: Thank you all, and happy reading! 

ANNOUNCING: THE LIBRARY IS NOW OPEN!

KLAINECRISSCOLFERLIBRARY

I’ve wanted to do this for a long time and with Zinnia’s help, we’ve created a Klaine & CrissColfer fanfic library blog.  It’s still under construction, but we wanted to make it public once we had a decent amount of fics already up.  There are currently over 100 Klaine and we’ve just started adding the CrissColfer ones.  The process is quite slow and time consuming because we want it to be as organized and user-friendly as possible.

Both Zinnia and I are running the blog, so if you have fic finding questions, or if you find an error, please send all questions and concerns to our ASK box.

Please be patient as we add fics, we literally have over 600 to go!  

When you’re on the blog, at the top there is a Klaine Fic Finder and a CrissColfer Fic Finder.  It will bring you to all the tags so you can search for what you’re looking for.  (some tags aren’t linked yet since we don’t have all fics added)

Example:

It’s quite a giant undertaking, but will be worth it in the end! Thanks for your patience!

~Lynne and Zinnia

German biologist Ernst Haeckel illustrated and described thousands of deep-sea specimens collected during the 1873-1876 H.M.S. Challenger expedition. Haeckel used a microscope to capture the intricate structure of these radiolarians—single-celled marine organisms with glassy (silica) skeletons—for his 1879 work Report on the Radiolaria collected by H.M.S. Challenger.
See this 45 other exquisite reproductions from 33 rare and beautifully illustrated scientific works in the exhibition, Opulent Oceans: Extraordinary Scientific Illustrations from the Museum’s Library, now open.

Philinda Library: Now Open

Welcome to the Philinda Fanfiction Library, a collection of fanfiction from across the web. 

Drawing by meltingchoco


Hello! I’m Elle, that’s me in the I <3 Philinda t-shirt. The girl in the yellow dress, that’s Emma. She’s in charge of communications, and I, well I read the fics, and add the fics to the library in the appropriate categories.Toni is our current library assistant, helping me to sort the fics, and Su helped with the layout and design. 

So, the basics about the library. The aim is for this to be a one-stop hub for all Philinda fanfic. Whether they be one-shots or 500k multi-chapters, this is the place you can find them, sorted alphabetically and catagorised based on theme(s).

When exploring the blog, fanfiction can be found in The Index. We don’t have too many categories at the moment, but are hoping to expand the list if they are in demand. So far we have only added fics from AO3, but fics from fanfiction.net and tumblr will be added in the upcoming weeks/months. 

Each week we will feature one fanfiction that we think everybody should read. This could be one recently written and posted, or a hidden gem from the very beginning of airing. We’ll also be setting up a “featured author” section, but that will come at a later date.

We’ve tried to explain as much as we can about the library at Information Desk, but if there are any other questions, please ask us here

For now, that’s pretty much everything! We hope you enjoy the fanfiction library, and shall begin phase two of uploads very soon!

Ciao!

Ready for some Spooky Science? Tremble before the fearsome Deep-Sea Devils!

Because the deep seas are so poor in nutrients, most deep-sea fishes are small—like this ferocious female black seadevil (lower right) that grows no larger than eight inches. These creatures were drawn by Fritz Winter for Die Tiefsee-Fische…(The deep-sea fishes…) published from 1906-1908. Author August Brauer, during the German Deep-Sea Expedition of 1898-1899, discovered an extraordinary array of fishes at depths between 3,300 and 13,000 feet, where scientists once believed no life could survive.  

See this 45 other exquisite reproductions from 33 rare and beautifully illustrated scientific works in the exhibition, Opulent Oceans: Extraordinary Scientific Illustrations from the Museum’s Library, now open!

An illustration of marine siphonophores. Apart from the artistic merits of this plate from Francois Peron’s Voyage de decouvertes aux terres australes…(1807-1816), it is remarkable that Peron collected intact these highly fragile marine siphonophores, which easily break into pieces at the slightest touch. 

See this 45 other exquisite reproductions from 33 rare and beautifully illustrated scientific works in the exhibition, Opulent Oceans: Extraordinary Scientific Illustrations from the Museum’s Library, now open!

Feast your eyes on Darwin’s barnacles!

This depiction of acorn barnacles (Megabalanus tintinnabulum) by George Brettingham Sowerby, comes from Charles Darwin’s massive four volume work A monograph on the sub-class Cirripedia, with figures of all the species, published just five years before his revolutionary book, On the Origin of Species (1859).

See this 45 other exquisite reproductions from 33 rare and beautifully illustrated scientific works in the exhibition, Opulent Oceans: Extraordinary Scientific Illustrations from the Museum’s Library, now open!

This plate by acclaimed artist William Dickes is from Philip Henry Gosse’s influential Actinologia Britannica: a history of the British sea anemones and corals (1860) and features stinging anemones that often attach themselves to hermit crab shells. They protect the crab while eating scraps of its food.

See this 45 other exquisite reproductions from 33 rare and beautifully illustrated scientific works in the exhibition, Opulent Oceans: Extraordinary Scientific Illustrations from the Museum’s Library, now open!

AMNH\R. Mickens

3

Now a new layout, better signage, and iPads are helping to bring the Huntingtons and their collection to life. Doors that were once closed between the rooms—the Large Library, Large Drawing Room, Small Drawing Room, and Dining Room—are now open. Visitors can move around and among the rooms, making it easier to take in the sumptuousness of the ornate decorations and gain closer, unobstructed views of the precious artworks, furniture, and decorative objects on display. A panel in each room orients the visitor, and smaller displays and iPads offer additional detail.

Read more about some of the new features of the Huntington Art Gallery‘s period rooms in “Open to Interpretation” on VERSO. There’s even a short video you can watch.

captions:
Large Library: In the past, sumptuous furnishings may have tempted visitors to touch. Now, thanks to interactive displays—such as this one on the Savonnerie carpets—visitors can.

Large Drawing Room: Open doors and better access in the Large Drawing Room and other period rooms allow visitors to explore the spaces Henry and Arabella Huntington inhabited. iPads offer detailed histories about the precious objects the rooms contain.

Large Library: Take a seat, really. The chairs on the right are modeled after Arabella Huntington’s favorite chairs and are meant for sitting.