liberation of greece

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Kapetanissa Sarika (Sara Yeshua), partisan leader of the women’s platoon of the Greek People’s Liberation Army’s 7th division, posing with fellow EAM fighters and a revolver, October 1944.

Born in the Jewish quarter of Chalkida in 1927, Sara Yeshua belongs to the emblematic figures of the resistance. Before she turned 15, Sara assisted the wounded at the city’s military hospital as a volunteer nurse. From the beginning of the German occupation (October 1943), she got involved with Greece’s National Liberation Front, took her mother and left Chalkida for Steni.

To guard against German incursions against the Jews who had fled to the mountains, the resistance dispersed the Jews in various villages (Paliouras, Theologos, Stropones, Vasiliko) and later organised an escape network by boat to Turkey from Tsakei beach. Sara was well regarded by her fellow resistance fighters as a passionate speaker advocating for armed struggle against the occupation forces, particularly among young women. At 17, after the horrific murder of Mendi Moschovitz by the Security Battalions in Stropones (4 March 1944) and the burning of Kourkouloi, she formed an independent female resistance group that fought and gathered intelligence. Armed with Molotov cocktails, they attacked outlying sites to draw the Germans away from the main target, and aided in the capture of collaborators.  By the end of the war, she was legendary among the partisans of Evia, Greece, as “Kapetanissa Sarika” (Partisan Leader Sara). 

ID #16201

Name: Dimitris

Age: 17

Country: Greece

Hello world :D

I’m Dimitris and I’m looking for a pen pal to write mails too because I think letters are a beautiful way to convey your thoughts and feelings.

Interests: books (of any kind but I have a special place in my heart for Classic Literature), writing, journalism, volleyball (although I don’t play as much lately), video-games <3, board games.

Favorite movies/shows: It would be too difficult to narrow it down to few so I’m just gonna say that I love the genres of Fantasy, Sci-fi, Adventure, Action, Mystery, Thriller, Horror and History.

Favorite artists/bands: Lady Gaga, Beyonce, Britney Spears, Sia, Adele, 3 Doors Down, ABBA, Black Eyed Peas, Bonnie Tyler, The Cure, In Flames etc. The list could go on forever. :P

Political views: Liberal Socialism

Religious views: Secular Humanism

Favorite quote (one of many): “I’m selfish, impatient, and a little insecure. I make mistakes, I’m out of control, and at times hard to handle. But if you can’t handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don’t deserve me at my best. ” ~ Marilyn Monroe

Preferences: Older than 17.

Kostas Zimeris     Woman Members of the Anti-fascist 54th Partisan Batallion of the National People’s Liberation Army, Ano Kerassia, Magnesia, Greece      1944

This interesting interpretation is by the British painter John Collier (1850–1934), and its called “After the murder” (1882). It depicts Clytemnestra bloody and with a heavy axe like a butcher, but she is looking proud and content.


Clytemnestra was the wife of Agamemnon, the king of Mycenae and leader of the Greek forces in the Trojan War. When the winds prevented the Greek ships from sailing. Agamemnon was told that the winds would return if he sacrificed his daughter Iphigeneia. Knowing that Clytemnestra never would permit this, he asked her to send Iphigeneia because he wanted to marry her to Achilles. When Iphigeneia arrived, she was sacrificed, which caused a lot of grief to her mother.

During the siege of Trojan, the horny Agamemnon quarrelled with Achilles for the possession of the female booty they made in the war and nearly ruined the Greek cause by his greed. After the war, he returned with Cassandra princess of Troy as his concubine.

In the meantime, Clytemnestra had begun a love affair with Aegisthus, her husband’s cousin. When Agamemnon arrived in Mycenae she waited until he was taking a bath and then she slaughtered him. Liberating herself and Greece of an egoistic horny old king.

Lord Byron wrote his last poem on this day

On this day (22 January) in 1824, Byron wrote “On This Day I Complete My Thirty-Sixth Year,” his last poem. He had arrived at Missolonghi three weeks earlier, taking command of his “army of liberation” which would free Greece from the Turks. But he died of fever on 19 April, after railing against incompetent doctors who literally bled him to death.

On This Day I Complete My Thirty-Sixth Year

‘Tis time the heart should be unmoved,
Since others it hath ceased to move:
Yet, though I cannot be beloved,
Still let me love!

My days are in the yellow leaf;
The flowers and fruits of love are gone;
The worm, the canker, and the grief
Are mine alone!

The fire that on my bosom preys
Is lone as some volcanic isle;
No torch is kindled at its blaze–
A funeral pile.

The hope, the fear, the jealous care,
The exalted portion of the pain
And power of love, I cannot share,
But wear the chain.

But ’tis not thus–and ’tis not here–
Such thoughts should shake my soul nor now,
Where glory decks the hero’s bier,
Or binds his brow.

The sword, the banner, and the field,
Glory and Greece, around me see!
The Spartan, borne upon his shield,
Was not more free.

Awake! (not Greece–she is awake!)
Awake, my spirit! Think through whom
Thy life-blood tracks its parent lake,
And then strike home!

Tread those reviving passions down,
Unworthy manhood!–unto thee
Indifferent should the smile or frown
Of beauty be.

If thou regrett’st thy youth, why live?
The land of honourable death
Is here:–up to the field, and give
Away thy breath!

Seek out–less often sought than found–
A soldier’s grave, for thee the best;
Then look around, and choose thy ground,
And take thy rest.

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|Greek God and Goddess Mythology|
|Edits made by me :)|