lgbt black films

Great lesbian TV show and film recommendations

Great lesbian films:

-          Imagine Me & You (2005, British)

-          Loving Annabelle (2006, American)

-          My Summer of Love (2004, British)

-          Black Swan (2010, American)

-          The Kids Are All Right (2010, American)

-          I Can’t Think Straight (2008, British)

-          Jenny’s Wedding (2015, American)

-          Lost And Delirious (2001, American)

-          Blue Is The Warmest Colour (2013, French)

-          The Secret Diaries of Miss Anne Lister (2010, British)

-          Carol (2015, American)

-          The Night Watch (2011, British)

-          Fingersmith (2005, British)

-          But I’m A Cheerleader (1999, American)

-          Tipping the Velvet (2002, British)

-          Gia (1998, American)

Great lesbian tv-shows:

-          The Fosters (2013-present, American)

-          Orphan Black (2013-present, Canadian)

-          Orange Is The New Black (2013-present, American)

-          The 100 (2014-present, American) (season 2 onwards)

-          Sugar Rush (2005-2006, British)

-          Grey’s Anatomy (2005-present, American) (season 5 onwards)

-          Glee (2009-2015, American) (season 3 onwards)

-          The L Word (2004-2009, American) 

-          Lip Service (2010-2012, British)

-          Skins (2007-2013, British) (seasons 3 & 4)

-          South of Nowhere (2005-2008, American) 

-          Sense8 (2015-present, American) 

-          Wynonna Earp (2016-present, American/Canadian)

-          Pretty Little Liars (2010-2017, American) 

-          Last Tango In Halifax (2012-present, British)

-          Banana (2015, British)

-          Faking It (2014-2016, American)

-          Bomb Girls (2012-2013, Canadian)

-          Black Mirror (2014-present, British, S3E4)

Moonlight and Racism

So, I decided to read some comments on different articles for Moonlight, which I instantly regretted because people are shitty. 

But there were comments that caught my attention. There were lot of people (who identified as gay, or black or POC, or whatever) who simply couldn’t understand, or relate to the story at all, and believed that it detracted from the overall film. 

But, that’s kind of the point of Moonlight. 

One of the things I loved about Moonlight was how it handled race as well as sexuality. If you’ve seen it, you know it has an all black cast. So, there isn’t a white (or nonblack) character around for audiences to project onto. And because all of these people are of the same race and live in the same conditions, they don’t need to translate any part of their experience for one another. The characters are black people living in an impoverished neighborhood in the American south (Miami Florida). Drugs are a natural part of the environment, and for many people it’s the only way they can make a living, because business in America don’t want to invest or place high end jobs in black neighborhoods. The people use AAVE without stopping to translate it for anyone. There are after school activities for kids to go to so they don’t get into trouble. Many kids spend time at home while their parents are away working. Hell, I remember taking a bubble bath with dish detergent.   There is the rough language that black boys constantly use (even when they’re with their friends) to make themselves to seem bigger, tougher and stronger. There is a run down feel to everyone in this movie (from Juan to Chiron to Teresa) and this comes from over work, constantly worrying about dangers in your neighborhood, and looking over your shoulder for cops or gangsters. The same run down feeling is shown in the setting as well. It’s obvious this town is in a constant state of construction (take the old house Lil’ hid in at the beginning of the film).  

And then add this with the main character’s sexuality, and how he (and the movie) navigate that. Despite Chiron’s sexuality, his experiences are strictly structured through an African-American lens. He doesn’t stop being black just because he’s learning about his sexuality. He doesn’t stop using AAVE just because he’s attracted to a man. He doesn’t stop going through the world as a black man, conditioned to be hyper masculine in a poor town just because he falls in love with Kevin. This film makes no apologies for its blackness. And the racism it deals with? It’s subtle and systematic.. 

When people think of racism in the movie, they think of something that’s easily recognizable (think slave movies, white people with whips, or segregation signs). But what’s interesting about Moonlight is that the racism these people deal with (the town that’s in constant construction, the drugs on the streets,) are all real aspects of systematic racism that black people have to live under. It’s not an easily identifiable constant that can be punched out, or reasoned with. It’s in the fabric of Black American life, and most people miss it unless you’ve lived under it.  And let’s be real, many white people (white gays included) wouldn’t pick up on it. 

And it’s so funny that people in the black community believe that once you come out as gay, suddenly you’re no longer black. It’s like…no. Our skin color’s still the same. We still lived under the same racial conditions that ya’ll lived under. We still dealt with the same white washed history, and have the same distrust of the American legal system. And with white gays, a lot of them expect us to stop being Black when we come out. We’re supposed to somehow shun our Black heritage (or at least downplay it) when we enter LGBT spaces. We’re not supposed to talk about race in the LGBT community because “We’re all gay!!!! Race doesn’t matter!!!!!!” Or we’re not supposed to question why so many white gays have no problem saying “I’m not into black guys.” And when we do interrogate them further on it, all they can say is “It’s just a preference” and expect that to be the end of it.

So yeah. This movie is beautifully authentic, and I love it for that reason. 

youtube

this was a really cute black queer short film.

also it was just very real and had no contrived storyline or character elements or anything.  just regular interactions. it’s like 20 min and i highly recommend to other folks who share the same identity intersections.

Today’s Tribeca selection in honor of LGBT Pride Month is Whoopi Goldberg’s important and invigorating documentary portrait, Moms Mabley: I Got Somethin’ to Tell You (2014), in which one bold comic icon honors another.

Moms Mabley was an unparalleled comedy pioneer who submerged her own sexuality behind a broad and brittle character that mesmerized audiences who knew nothing of this side-splitting stand-up’s true queer identity. Goldberg’s film is a deeply fascinating study of the duality between performer and persona but also a heartfelt tribute to a trailblazer who redefined what it meant to be a “funny woman,” as well as what such a woman could potentially achieve.

Call to action - Storytellers.

Right now, children are growing up in a world where global leaders and growing movements are promoting hate. Where you can be a misogynist, a racist, a xenophobe and a homophobe and end up in the most powerful position on this planet.

The result of yesterday’s vote sends all the wrong messages. It teaches young people that if you are different, that if you do not conform to social norms, you are not valid. Your voice will not be heard.

The media have undoubtedly played a large role in this election and it can be discouraging and difficult to accept but all is not lost. Remember some of the great storytelling that has been commissioned in recent years. This work is more important now than ever. If we cannot rely on our governments to set the right examples then the media has a responsibility to do so.

Film studios, production houses, television networks: Be brave, be bold.
Independent filmmakers, artists, aspiring storytellers: Unite, collaborate. You have mobile phones with incredible cameras, you have the internet, you have a platform when others don’t. Use it.

Champion unheard voices.

Originally posted by henamedmemalala

Expose difficult truths.

Originally posted by flyguytony

Hold a mirror up to society and highlight its flaws.

Promote inclusivity and diversity, respect and kindness.

Originally posted by lavirtud

Show young women they can be strong. 

Originally posted by thepumpkinqueenn

Show young men that emotion is not weakness.

Originally posted by prxncxss88

Show that people fleeing war and poverty deserve to live in a safe and fair world, to be welcomed, not feared.

Show that everyone has a right to be who they are without shame, that love is love, that every human being is unique therefore and that being different is really the norm.

Educate by shining a light on the difficulties in our countries’ pasts.

Originally posted by muzzle84

Explain why we must never forget our history in order to learn from it. 

Originally posted by cris-accortez

Emphasise that the colour of your skin, the religion you practice, your physical health or mental health, the person you love, the person you identify yourself as, the country/body/family you were born into should never dictate your treatment by society.

Create stories where people are people instead of subject matters or tropes.

One race. Humanity. Don’t let society split it into factions and decide who is valid and who is not.

Show the world it in all of its glory and all of its shame.

Importantly: Don’t ever stop finding humour in the darkest of times(lines).

Originally posted by billieviperarchive

After all, laughter is the best medicine.

Originally posted by northgang

So keep entertaining, provide escapism for those who will need it. Create the world you want to live in, a future people can look towards and fight for.

Don’t forget to write the happy ending once in a while.

Originally posted by silent-force

LGBT Pride is this month and we’ve been spotlighting some of the astonishing films about LGBT subjects that have played Tribeca throughout the years.

Today’s film is James Crump’s BLACK WHITE + GRAY: A PORTRAIT OF SAM WAGSTAFF AND ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE (2007), which allows us a moving, sensitive glimpse inside the lives and minds of two art world icons. In this rare and vital documentary study, queer art begets uncontrollable queer love between curator-collector Sam Wagstaff and iconoclastic photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, whose relationship would indelibly alter the New York art scene as their creative products came to define the tastes of the city’s culturati. Crump’s documentary looks deeper and beyond.

Orphan Black and Hopes

I just saw the last episode of this amazing show and I have so many feelings that I don’t even know how to start to describe them.
I think that I have to start with happiness. The happiness of know that only the bad guys died this time. Happiness to know that they didn’t killed Arthur, a black man that in other series (americans, mostly) end dead.
Happiness to know that Cophine my favorite couple had their happy ending and I’m glad for that and a little scared too because with those kind of series I’ll become used to want a happy ending for all my favorites w|w couples. This for  me started with Carmilla.
Happiness to know that despite of all the drama that we had, they ended together and more strong than ever and I loved the words of Sarah to John when she killed him.
I survived you, we survived you, me and my sisters together, this is evolution.
Sarah knows that the sestras are lab experiment and always will, but they are humans and no man or corporation will never be able to take away their humanity.
This strong message of  female empowerment is so amazing that is one of the most important things in the show.
Unfortunately, this world is always managed by men mentallity that is always focused on themself but here, in this show they show us otherwise. I’m not saying that all the men are bad, because they’re really good men that deserves credits too. In the show, we have Arthur, Donnie and Felix and I like them.
If there are other thing that I want to detail is Sarah. She spent almost the entire episode hiding her feelings about Siobhan’s death and I loved to see her in that flashback supporting with her pregnacy. I had tears with that scene and with the scene where finally she let herself to cry.
It broke my heart to know that she was so used to have bad times, and have to fight for everything now without her mother that it’s broke me, because I know that feeling.  I spent the same things and I know how hard it is to feel normal.
The last scene was lovely and hear Cosima and Delphine speaking spanish, my language was awesome. I loved to know that Evelyne’s voice sounded so natural and not robotical when she talk, only because french is a romance language with latin roots. I just loved it.

Another thing to thanks of this show, my buddies. I’m so glad to have found so special group of people that I have no words. @madnanc @seanpgilroy @mlleclaudine @324niehauscormierb21 @orphanzero @evelynespacifier @purplenightsky69 @adherantnerdhi @foggyheartconnoisseur only for naming some, but there are more.
If there are other thing that I want to detail is Sarah. She spent almost the entire episode hiding her feelings about Siobhan’s death and I loved to see her in that flashback supporting with her pregnacy. I had tears with that scene and with the scene where finally she let herself to cry.
It broke my heart to know that she was so used to have bad times, and have to fight for everything now without her mother that it’s broke me, because I know that feeling.  I spent the same things and I know how hard it is to feel normal.
The last scene was lovely and hear Cosima and Delphine speaking spanish, my language was awesome. I loved to know that Evelyne’s voice sounded so natural and not robotical when she talk, only because french is a romance language with latin roots. I just loved it.

Another thing to thanks of this show, my buddies. I’m so glad to have found so special group of people that I have no words.
I think that I have to say thanks to the Canadian film industry. Not only for Orphan Black, also for Carmilla, and Wynonna Earp that are canadian shows, and movies. I’m so happy to know that this industry that seems small, I don’t know if it is. doesn’t need big scenarios or a lot of money to make great productions. That is something that are very valious and now I know and hope that the canadians don’t dissapoint me because they spoiled me with all these good stories.
This is not a goodbye per se, because obviously I’ll stay around for Wynonna Earp and Wayhaught, but is a goodbye for @orphanblack and Cophine. The best story, characters, and fandom ever.