lewis-b.-smedes

Forgiving does not erase the bitter past. A healed memory is not a deleted memory. Instead, forgiving what we cannot forget creates a new way to remember. We change the memory of our past into a hope for our future.
—  Lewis B. Smedes
Forgiving is love’s toughest work, and love’s biggest risk. If you twist it into something it was never meant to be, it can make you a doormat or an insufferable manipulator. Forgiving seems almost unnatural. Our sense of fairness tells us people should pay for the wrong they do. But forgiving is love’s power to break nature’s rule.
—  Lewis B. Smedes
Forgiving does not erase the bitter past. A healed memory is not a deleted memory. Instead, forgiving what we cannot forget creates a new way to remember. We change the memory of our past into a hope for our future.
—  Lewis B. Smedes

Forgiveness, Free yourself now exercise by Doreen Virtue Ph.D

(companion piece to Corral Visualization)

Anyone can feel more at peace and more energized through the process of forgiveness. This process reminds me of throwing off weights when riding in a hot air balloon so you can go higher up. Old anger, fear, and resentment are dead weights that slow us and drain our vitality. Perhaps you have some weight you can throw over the side of your hot air balloon right now. When you forgive the world—including yourself—you become lighter and much less fearful.

This process takes between 30 and 60 minutes to complete, and believe me, it is a worthwhile time investment. Many clients report that this single exercise immediately transforms their lives in powerfully positive ways. Here are some steps to freedom through forgiveness:


1.    Know the Benefits of Forgiveness—Forgiveness is different than saying, “I lose,” or “I was wrong and you were right.” It is different from letting someone off the hook for a perceived wrong deed. Forgiveness is simply a way of freeing your spirit and realizing your unlimited nature. Peacefulness and increased energy are the prizes, and forgiveness is their price. To me, it’s a bargain.


2.   Take a Forgiveness Inventory—(This exercise is partially based on the work of author John Randolph Price.) Write the name of EVERY person, living or deceased, who has ever irritated you. Don’t worry if this gets long, most people find that they have a three- or four-page list and are able to suddenly remember names of people they hadn’t thought about in years. Some people even put down names of pets who have irritated them. And be sure to include your own name on that list.


3.   Release and Forgive—In a quiet room without distractions, go down the list one name at a time. Hold the image of each person in your mind and tell him or her, “I forgive you and I release you. I hold no unforgiveness back. My forgiveness for you is total. I am free and you are free.” Visualize your resentments being swept away or popping like a soap bubble. This process may take thirty minutes or longer. If you’re afraid that this process might take too long, feel free to break the list down into smaller, more manageable chunks. However, it is important to stick with it until the entire list is complete.


4.   Do Nightly Releasements—Every evening before retiring, do a mental review of the day. Is there anyone you need to forgive? Doing this cleanse every night, much as you would wash your face nightly, helps to cleanse away the resentment so that it won’t accumulate