lethal drugs

The LD50 (the dose in which that substance has a 50% mortality rate) for LSD is amazingly high in contrast to the amounts needed for it to cause any felt effects in the human body. There’s very few cases of death from LSD whereas alcohol is one of the most lethal drugs on the planet. This is definitely not a call to prohibit alcohol again. We saw how that worked the first time. But we also see how drug prohibition is working right now which is not at all.

The Lost Special: The One Way to Tie Up Every Loose Thread

In the last month this corner of the Sherlock fandom has thrown out a multitude of ideas for a narrative that could potentially resolve every last inconsistency in Sherlock series 4. Not knowing it, this community has debated different readings – all perfectly valid with only minor holes in logic – but have missed how they might all fit together into an intricate puzzle, each reading validating the other.

I have found one way to connect every loose thread.

Topics resolved include:

– EMP Theory vs “TFP as John’s TAB”: why both readings are meant to be exposed to the viewer (but we just found them too early)
– Benedict’s insanely long monologue they mentioned him having in Series 4.
– How another episode would only be comprised of a few new scenes
– Mary’s character development drifting far from her original plotline
– Moffat’s Doctor Who narrative that includes Toby Jones as a Dream Lord and what that means for Amy in “Amy’s Choice” and Sherlock in The Lost Special.
– How POVs intertwine in TFP, and how TPLOSH inspired the way The Lost Special would end.
– The entire bizarre nature of Series 4
– Breaking the 4th Wall
– The focus in The Six Thatchers on “The Duplicate Man”, “Twins”, “Two places at once”, and “Dead AND alive”.
– Three Garridebs
– Benedict claiming “Love conquers all” while Steven Moffat facepalms.

So if you want to know the one way this could all work, check out the rest of this post. But hear me out until the end, suspend your disbelief until you’ve finished, because regardless of whether or not you believe we’re getting The Lost Special, this reading which combines everything we’ve talked about for the last year is definitely arguable and until something else gets proposed, it is the one I’m sticking with til the bitter end.

Keep reading

I just wanted to make a post about Terre Haute...

and what it could be like.

Terre Haute is a HIGH security prison, it has a max security federal correctional institute, a medium security federal correctional institute, and a low security prison camp. The maximum security facility houses federal death row inmates. ( A special confinement unit is where most death row inmates are held. It has been accused of having inadequate conditions, and also that those on Death Row are routinely denied basic medical care, mental health services, and are subjected to noise that causes sleep deprivation.


The super-max cell is similar to this one shown above. They are by themselves, their meals are pushed through a slot, there is NO recreation but they’re allowed out of their tiny cells 3 times a week into cages.

The Death Chamber inside of Terre Haute Penitentiary. 

Executions are performed here but may be moved to a state where it is legal if it is more convenient to the family and victims. 

Between 3-12 hours before death a last meal is given to the inmate cooked by prison staff (alcohol is not an option). The inmate wears khaki pants, a white t-shirt, white socks, and slip on shoes to the gurney.

Up to 8 victims(or members of the victims family) can watch the execution, also the inmate can choose a spiritual advisor, 3 family members, and 2 attorneys. They are all located outside the execution room and can watch through glass. Ten members of the media are also allowed.

Last words are an option given to the condemned, a signal is then given by a U.S. marshal, and an executioner starts administering the lethal drugs. Time of Death is recorded, and almost always occurs early in the morning. 


short and simple but just wanted to give some info on it. 

[Bruce & Jason Panels] Detective Comics #790

So, just a disclaimer, Jason Todd isn’t actually in the issue, but it does revolve around him. He hasn’t come back as Red Hood just yet. 

Let’s just say that it’s reminiscent of the period immediately after his death when Bruce Wayne was noticeably more broody and brutal in his anti-crime spree than usual. Back then, the Bat Family was only composed of Dick Grayson, Barbara Gordon, Alfred Pennyworth, and a persistent young Tim Drake “auditioning” for a membership. This time around, their family has grown somewhat, and includes Cassandra Cain as Batgirl and Stephanie Brown as Spoiler. 

Backstory (spoilers ahead): A new drug called G.H.D. is circulating the Gotham streets, killing some citizens, including a young female. Batman tracks down the supplier and throws him through a window several stories off the ground. Batgirl swoops in to catch the man, and Batman gets more information out of him through what his does best - instilling fear. 


“How you hurt him. You were punishing him.”

After the bust, Cass calls Bruce out on his… unusual behavior.

That look on Bruce’s face in the third panel below… You just know that he can’t argue with her observation. 

“It’s always personal.”

That cool detachment Bruce has? That wall he built around himself? All of it is meant to keep his mission from being compromised. His mission to protect his family, his friends, innocent lives. That’s the form of affection he’s developed over years of trauma and obsessive discipline to equip himself for this mission.

So, if he tries to shut down Steph’s aspiration to be a vigilante? It’s personal. If he tries to keep a brash young lady from jumping headfirst into the field without a parachute - the same way a fifteen-year-old boy once did? It’s personal. And, if you think he’s an unreasonable grumpy old man for doing it, he won’t fault you for begrudging him. (He’ll care, sure, but he won’t show it.) 

“It’s strange. How he stops seeing them… the scars.”

This issue is actually entitled “Scarification”, and it seems that the next set of panels explains why.  It’s probably this day, out of all the days in the year, that reminds him why his scars matter. Why everything seems to matter more.

“If this is about what today is, then… just know that I’m here if you need… to talk.”

I love how much the Batkids understand Bruce. Even if they know that it’s, more often than not, futile to appeal to him on an emotional level, they’ll keep trying anyway, knowing that he secretly needs them.  

“Happy birthday, kid.”

Bruce harasses one more criminal before the set of panels below.  He finally tracks down the supplier and makes him choose between taking his own lethal drug or jail time. (Guess which one he picks?)

It’s these last two scenes that gives the story its story. Bruce always has difficulty with expressing emotion, so it shouldn’t surprise us that sometimes it comes out as aggression. 

On the day that reminds him of the son he lost to the thing they do, with another teenager wanting to be part of it all… must be extra hard, huh?

“For some of us there is no going back.”


This was a simple, but sweet tribute to Jason. A reminder that Bruce loved loves him and knew him well. That in his memory, Bruce is trying to keep from making the same mistakes.

(And, it was bittersweet how Cass “met” Jason for the first time like that… It gets better in the New 52′s Batman and Robin Eternal, though!)

here’s what’s happening

Russia’s Foreign Minister warns US not to strike Syria again
Spicer says he’s not going anywhere after claim that Hitler didn’t use chemical weapons
Classified docs contradict Nunes surveillance claims, GOP and Dem sources say
▪ $2.9 million: Melania Trump wins damages, apology from Daily Mail
Arkansas: Seven people to be executed in 11 days because lethal injection drugs about to expire
Trump campaign chairman Manafort’s firm received Ukraine ledger payout
Hubble just spotted something massive coming out of Uranus
▪ It’s National Bookmobile Day! (Also: National Grilled Cheese Day.)

Posted by Today’s Document on Tumblr.


here’s a t-rex conducting the ‘Jurassic Park’ theme

WQXR


here’s breaking cuttlefish news

SMOL

Posted by Monterey Bay Aquarium on Tumblr.


here’s a gif

¯\_( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)_/¯


here’s something to consider

Take a few minutes to listen to some music that inspires you.

dr-hegemony  asked:

Okay so I was watching Zootopia once again (5-7th time), and I just noticed that the Audience is never told or hinted to about how the grand scheme of Bellweather was put in place, how Mayor lionheart got involved, how otterton got involved with the case or why he was going to Mr. Big. And the mental gymnastics one has to go through to get to a reasonable system of events is quite extensive.

The only thing that really rustles me is that Judy’s rabbit hick parents were growing lethal rabid drug flowers in their fields.

“Hey kids, you stay out of that patch of plot convenience!! These pretty blue flowers will make you MURDER EVERYTHING if you injest them, which is why we’re growing so many, because for some reason it’s legal in this universe! You gettin all this, Jude?”

Johnny and former death row inmate Damien Echols join fellow protestors in Arkansas on April 14th. Johnny, Damien, and the other protestors were fighting against the mayor of Arkansas’ decision to execute 8 death row inmates in two weeks due to the state’s supply of lethal drugs about to expire.

nytimes.com
BREAKING: Federal Judge Blocks Arkansas Executions
A federal judge halted Arkansas’s plans for an extraordinary series of executions set to begin on Monday. A state judge’s ruling had already put the schedule in doubt.
By Alan Blinder

ATLANTA — A federal judge on Saturday halted Arkansas’s plans for an extraordinary series of executions set to begin on Monday, adding to the legal chaos over what began as the state’s efforts to put eight convicted murderers to death in less than two weeks.

Although the Arkansas attorney general’s office immediately announced that it would appeal the ruling, Saturday’s preliminary injunction by Judge Kristine G. Baker of Federal District Court in Little Rock, Ark., threatened to unravel the state’s plan for its first executions since 2005.

The decision compounded the legal turmoil around the state’s execution schedule, which Gov. Asa Hutchinson set in February. Rulings by other judges had already resulted in stays of execution for two prisoners, and on Friday, a Circuit Court judge in Pulaski County, Ark., issued a restraining order that barred the state from using its stock of one of its three execution drugs.

In a 101-page order on Saturday, Judge Baker embraced arguments by the eight prisoners whose executions had been scheduled, plus one other death row inmate, that Arkansas’s reliance on midazolam, a sedative, as an execution drug posed a risk to their constitutional rights.

Continue reading the main story

“The threat of irreparable harm to the plaintiffs is significant: If midazolam does not adequately anesthetize plaintiffs, or if their executions are ‘botched,’ they will suffer severe pain before they die,” Judge Baker, an appointee of President Barack Obama, wrote. She added that the men had “shown a significant possibility that they will succeed on the merits of their method of execution claims based on midazolam.”

The drug is one of the world’s most popular and versatile sedatives, and at least six states have used it for executions since 2013. Less than two years ago, the United States Supreme Court upheld its use as an execution drug.

But the divided Supreme Court’s opinion in that case, Glossip v. Gross, did little to settle the controversy around midazolam, which was developed in the 1970s as an alternative to Valium and emerged only in recent years as an execution drug. After the Supreme Court’s 5-to-4 ruling, critics of the death penalty continued to argue that the drug lacked the power to render a prisoner sufficiently unconscious before executioners administered drugs that cause pain when stopping a person’s breathing and heartbeat.

The drug has been used for executions that mostly drew little outrage, but it was also part of a handful of executions that went awry. In 2014, for instance, midazolam was part of the drug protocol in Arizona when a man’s execution lasted nearly two hours; the state has since agreed not to use midazolam to carry out death sentences.

During a four-day hearing this month in her courtroom in Arkansas’s capital, Judge Baker heard the arguments about the drug that have become familiar across the country. Her ruling will be tested in the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, which sits in St. Louis and is among the nation’s most conservative appellate benches.

“It is unfortunate that a U.S. district judge has chosen to side with the convicted prisoners in one of their many last-minute attempts to delay justice,” said Judd Deere, a spokesman for the state attorney general. “This decision is significantly out of step with precedent from the Eighth Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court.”

John C. Williams, a lawyer for some of the prisoners, welcomed the ruling, which he described as “legally sound and reasonable.”

“The unnecessarily compressed execution schedule using the risky drug midazolam denies prisoners their right to be free from the risk of torture,” he said in a statement. “We are calling on state officials to accept the federal court’s decision, cancel the frantic execution schedule, and propose a legal and humane method to carry out its executions.”

The crush of rulings and orders came as Arkansas prepared to carry out an execution on Monday in the state’s death chamber in Grady, southeast of Little Rock. Mr. Hutchinson, a Republican, acknowledged that the planned pace was connected to the April expiration date of the state’s midazolam stock.

The schedule envisioned by the state drew international condemnation and skepticism. It also, predictably, prompted a barrage of legal challenges and clemency pleas.

Although the case before Judge Baker was central to the efforts to stop the executions, state judges were also asked to consider an array of arguments, including one on Friday that Arkansas had relied on a false pretense when it bought one of its lethal injection drugs from the nation’s largest pharmaceutical distributor.

According to that company, McKesson Corporation, the state bought vials of vecuronium bromide in July, even though Arkansas officials knew that McKesson and the drug’s manufacturer had taken steps to prevent its use in executions.

A quiet clash with the state simmered for months, and in a letter to state officials on Thursday, a lawyer for McKesson complained that the Arkansas prison system had “purchased the products on an account that was opened under the valid medical license of an Arkansas physician, implicitly representing that the products would only be used for a legitimate medical purpose.”

The company went to court on Friday, and a judge quickly blocked state officials from carrying out executions with the drug. On Saturday, the state appealed the decision, which Judge Wendell Griffen announced on a day he joined a protest against capital punishment outside the Governor’s Mansion in Little Rock.

Two other drug manufacturers said they believed they had made the state’s supplies of midazolam and potassium chloride, and they had asked Judge Baker to bar Arkansas from using their products in lethal injections.

Judge Baker did not mention the manufacturers in her order. Instead, she focused on what the drug’s critics have depicted as the perils of executions involving midazolam.

Citing anecdotal evidence and witness testimony, the judge said there “appears at least a possibility” that “the inmate may regain some level of consciousness during the process before the second and third drugs are administered” if the midazolam did not work as anticipated by the state.

“Arkansas does not intend to torture plaintiffs to death,” Judge Baker wrote. “However, the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition of cruel and unusual punishment is not limited to inherently barbaric punishments.”

Writing for the Supreme Court in the 2015 case that upheld midazolam’s use as an execution drug, Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. also referred to the questions about how much constitutional protection people should have from pain.

The court, Justice Alito said, had found “that the Constitution does not require the avoidance of all risk of pain.”

Then he added: “After all, while most humans wish to die a painless death, many do not have that good fortune. Holding that the Eighth Amendment demands the elimination of essentially all risk of pain would effectively outlaw the death penalty altogether.”

12 things I learned while being 18

1. no matter how old you get, crying in your mom’s arms will always make you feel 3 years old

2. if you don’t want to piss people off, be a vegetable. dance like an idiot at parties, laugh like a walrus at serious meetings, sing pop songs at the top of your lungs in front of your indie friends, wear red socks when the dress code is black and white. the point isn’t rebellion, the point is expression. the point is the world would be a much better place if we were taught to be fascinated by our differences instead of fearing them, if we were taught to explore individuality instead of controlling it. if we were taught that even if we disagree with somebody’s way of expression, we have no authority to ever tell somebody they can’t be who they are. free yourself, or let us be free

3. kisses are the best form of communication. it is your chance to say everything words can’t express. when you feel weak and fragile and you’ve given them so much of your heart they could break it at any second, say it.. kiss slowly, kiss softly, fingers running through their spine, face between hands. when you feel like you’re on fire, like no matter how close you are to each other you’ll never be close enough, say it. hands running through hair, whispers in between, desperate kisses, laughter in their mouth. i’m all for words, but, trust me, kisses are better than poetry

4. pain is a monster fed by fear- the more afraid you are of it finding you, the more it’ll grow. the more you run away, the stronger it’s legs get. it’ll appear when you drink a glass of wine by yourself and you find yourself crying for no reason. or when you realize you haven’t laughed in a week. pain hates being ignored. so make friends with pain. shake it’s hand. write about it, cry your eyes out in the shower, and let it slowly leave your body until you are clean again.

5. believe in everything, just in case. my favorite word of all time is “serendipity”. it means a “fortunate accident” and it is the most important word in the world, because it taught me the only way to experience magic is to believe in it. when you bump into a stranger and it feels like you’ve known them forever, when you apply for the school of your dreams and it doesn’t work out, your phone turning off before you have to send an important text- . the universe is in constant communication with us, playing a charming little game of charades. we guess and we guess and we make a fool of ourselves guessing, but we will find our answer, and the whole room will cheer when we do

6. when you cant find love, make it. if you’re having the worst day of your life, smile at people walking on a sidewalk. text your best friend and tell her you are so happy the boy she’s liked since 7th grade is in her math class. it’ll make you feel better. love is love, given or taken, created or received

7. there are two kinds of people in the world: the ones that are relieved by this next sentence, and the ones that are worried: karma is real. some people will gossip and spread poison, they will forget about lifting themselves up and become obsessed with tearing you down, they will whisper quiet so you know its not meant for you, but loud enough so you feel like the smallest person in the room, and after you’ve beat yourself up wondering what you did wrong you will try and gain their acceptance. and they will still hate you. darling, it never had anything to do with you. hatred is only a reflection of people’s own misery, they have so much of it they want to find other places to put it in. but whatever you do, don’t lose hope in people and don’t stop being kind to people. let life do it’s thing. be kind, work hard, cheer people on, and life will be good to you.

8. spend as much time as you can with your family. learn about where your grandparents come from, ask them how they fell in love, tell your dad to tell you about that time he got detention in high school. they’re getting older too

9. all your troubles will disappear with chanel #5 perfume on your neck. well, they wont. but your troubles will smell delicious. the only thing worth spending a lot of money on is a perfume that makes you feel like the queen of the earth. your scent is your signature

10. love is the most lethal drug of all. sometimes you will have to walk away from people you’re addicted to. you will need to stop making excuses for people that hurt you. and you will take your heart from the shelf they put it on and say “thank you for your time, but this felt damn freezing up there.” and you will reach up even if you don’t feel tall enough, and you will take it from the shelf, and you will put it back in your scratched up chest, and you will button up your shirt, and it’ll hurt like hell, but you will walk away. it will be the hardest thing you’ve ever had to do. you will think you’ve walked away from something you can’t replace, that you’ll never feel that high again. trust me, you will

11. be kind to people, keep people’s secrets, be the one that answers the phone when nobody else does, make everyone feel importan. no matter what happens, be as kind as you can

12. feel everything, that is the difference between living and existing

—  camila cabello { @waakeme-up }

bundy-theodore-deactivated20170  asked:

Did you hear bow Arkansas plans to execute 10 inmates in the next couple weeks before the lethal injection drugs expire? 💀😷

Yes, I just reblogged the post I wrote about that! It’s a really sad story all around. They are rushing to execute these men because their supply of midazolam - a drug that has caused numerous botched executions - is going to expire, and they can’t get any more. This has never happened before in recent American history.

themissimmortal  asked:

TOP overdosed??? 😢😢😢

http://www.digitalmusicnews.com/2017/06/06/big-bang-lethal-drug-overdose/

This was just posted like 10 minutes ago. Says muscle relaxants, he’s been having pains from prior injuries from acts and stuff and the stress from being away from his family aka bigbang and actual family is been huge on him. He’s known them for over 10 years so he’s definitely feeling lonely and isolated despite being crowded around people.

10

I strove to become a wonderful doctor like my father. Instead, I ended up being forced to make lethal drugs.

How many times have I thought of killing myself? Yet, I couldn’t go through with it…