let's try this again~

niall: i see freddie son—no, scratch that

niall: i see child baby freddie—nope, let’s try this again

niall: i see uncommonly large for his age freddie—dammit

niall: let’s just go with little freddie

Goddess Ashi: Lets Try This Again

(For @drfoxes Samurai Jack “Goddess Ashi’ AU.)

It took a lot of power to give herself a physical form. The skill was something that had taken her so long to learn how to control, but even now she still felt that she had more to learn about it. Each visit to Earth was tiring, but each visit was getting longer.

For this particular trip, she was determined to stay longer.

‘Three days.’ Yes, She could make it for three days if she really tried hard enough-

“Ashi, try to relax. We can plan for it now and be ready to go whenever you come to visit next.”

Jack seemed capable of reading her mind as of late. Always noting whatever it was she seemed to be thinking of, sometimes hitting the nail so on the head that she would almost feel compelled to applaud his insight - Or make her consider that it may just be a new power of hers that linked their minds. Either or, as she didn’t quite know what she was capable of yet.

"I can’t relax when it comes to this. Our last wedding ended in disaster! This one will have to be perfect- but everything is so limited.”

Her hands began to shake a little, but she willed them to stop. Both in fear of loosing control of her physical form- and of spilling the tea her fiancé had prepare for her.

"Ashi… Worse things could have happened that day.” Jack sighed, reaching across the table to hold her hand.

"Disappearing while walking down the aisle? What could be worse?” The sullen expression that overcame Jack made Ashi want to pull those words out of the air and eat them.

"Being the one who didn’t leave.” Scratch that, now she wanted to take back the ENTIRE conversation.

"Jack… I’m sorry.”

"No, it’s okay. You couldn’t help it.” Jack replied, replacing his sullen look with his kind, familiar smile. “We’re very lucky to have this time together.”

That samurai always seemed to know just the things to say and do to make Ashi’s entire attitude change, sometimes almost instantly.

"As usual, you’re right.”

The goddess appreciated her love’s optimism towards their situation. With that, she took a deep breath, and cleared her thoughts of her set deadline. Planning could happen now, and the rest could happen whenever.

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Tumblr ate the other post … so here is a redone version.

My sister loves @emuyh-art‘s spideypool au and showed me this so I had to draw it for her.

anyone else kinda terrified you’ll never be able to hold a job in the future because of your mental illness

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Be my girlfriend because:

-I’ll buy/make you food
-Staying in and watching a movie is always an option
-I will surprise you with flowers for no reason other than I love you
-Cuddles, all the time
-We can be nerds and geek out over stupid things together
-I’ll (try to) harmonize with you while singing in the car
-Sad? We can make out. Happy? We can make out.
-I’ll rub your butt
-We can treat dogs like our babies
-I’ll protect you from anything scary
-I’ll never ask for anything except a genuine smile
-We can take naps together, any time of day

The 2 Elements of an ORIGINAL STORY IDEA

If you’ve been doing this writing thing for more than one day, you’ve likely experienced the following worry: 

“What if my story idea ISN’T ORIGINAL?”

And if my experience is any indication, things spiraled downwards from there: “What if it’s cliche? What if there’s nothing new here?! It IS cliche. It ISN’T original. I’m a failure! ALL MY WRITING NEEDS TO BURN!”

Calm yourself. There’s a way to make sure that your story concept is unique.  

First, what IS a story concept? It’s the initial idea that made you want to write the thing. It’s the “What If” question that starts everything off. Later, it will be the promise that hooks the reader or audience, and makes them want to experience the story. 

So for example: What if Cinderella was a cyborg? What if a rat wanted to be a french chef? What if a fish had to venture across the ocean to find his son who’s captive in a dentist’s office aquarium?   

All great concepts. All of which seem to be comprised of two elements: something that we already know about, a set up that establishes expectations, and then something contrasting and surprising, which creates irony or surprise.  
So the first element of a successful story concept is FAMILIARITY. 

Establishing expectations? Something we already know about? Familiarity?! That sounds like the definition of UNorginal. 

Hear me out. 

What do readers do when foraging for a new novel at the bookstore? Certain readers gravitate to certain shelves. Some go to mysteries, some to crime, a whole lot to romance, and the rest to the other genres that are too numerous to list.

 Why is this? Because genres give them a pretty good idea about what they’re going to get. Readers already know the conventions of the genre. They’ve already put in the work of learning, accepting, and enjoying these conventions. 

Genres give both reader and writer something to go on right away. For the reader, genres are expectations for story events, setting, character, and more, which are automatically enjoyable to them. For a writer, it’s a set of expectations which can be flipped to create something remarkable and unique.  

It’s like telling a joke. Without a setup, there can’t be a punchline. 

The genres are the setup, the individual twist the author puts on that genre is the punchline. Or in other words, readers truly do want the same thing –only different.  

To illustrate this, let’s take a look at one of the most successful stories of all time.

With space ships, interplanetary travel, sentient robots, and aliens running amok, Star Wars LOOKS to be the kind of story that requires the audience to expend lots of mental energy to comprehend and believe. At first glance, it seems that imaginations are going to have to stretch a great deal, and there won’t be anything familiar to ground us – this SEEMS like an uncomfortably new, unwelcoming world. But I doubt if anyone has ever felt uncomfortable or unwelcome while watching Star Wars. And the reason for this can be summed up with one ellipsis-ended sentence:

Suddenly, all is clear. This isn’t the hard-to-imagine future, this is the PAST. We’re not being asked to imagine and believe a totally new world; we’re being taken to the realm of “far, far away”, a place we’ve known since childhood. Isn’t “a long time ago” just another way of saying “once upon a time”? Yes, it is, so we know where we are now. We are in a fairy tale, a myth.  

The familiarity of fairy tales sets us at ease and sets our expectations in place. Expectations which Star Wars meets with flying colors: A farmboy who must become a knight. A princess imploring for aide. A mystical wise-old-man mentor. Sword fights between good and evil. A magic that operates like religion. A dark lord and a dark side. Star Wars was built upon something we already know, something timeless, something we’ve always enjoyed. 

And once those well-known expectations were set, Star Wars was free to add the unexpected and create one of those most memorable story worlds ever.
Think of a story you love, and you’ll probably be able to identify the something-already-known aspect of it.  

How about Harry Potter? 

When we hear “boarding school”, mental images and probabilities are instantly conjured in our minds. We picture classrooms, dormitories, a campus with very old buildings, kids in uniforms, a giant place for meals, living through a schoolyear with a bunch of kids your age, etc. Even if we don’t know much about boarding school, we all know what regular school is like (even us homeschoolers over here *waves*) and our expectations for that are nearly identical from person to person.  

So what does this prove?

It proves that one half of your story’s concept must be grounded in something we already know, and know well. These are the expectations you are going to establish for your reader, before the second element of your concept upends everything and creates something wholly unique. 

You need FAMILIARITY. You need to ground your concept in something WELL-KNOWN. Only then will you be able to create something ORIGINAL. 

Where can familiarity be found?  

1. Genre Conventions 

2. Occupations 

3. Well-known stories  

The possibilities are not limited to these categories, of course. Familiar subjects can be found within many other areas. However, Familiar elements seem to share certain qualities … 

Provides a rough timeline

⦁ Conjures imagery

⦁ Sets expectations for events, characters, opposition, etc

⦁ Has natural potential for conflict 

⦁ Serves as a goal-oriented backdrop for the plot

To see how this works, let’s look at Harry Potter again: 

Familiarity: Going to boarding school. (An occupation)

Timeline: A school year (which Voldy always lets Harry complete before trying to kill him again, bless him.)

Story Expectations: When we hear “school”, we know what we’re going to get.

Imagery: Boarding school conjures tons of possibilities. 

Conflict Potential: It’s a thousand kids living in one castle with a handful of adults – there’s going to be conflict. 

Goal-Oriented: School is inherently goal directed. You want to graduate. And in the case of boarding school, you want to win the house cup. 

But of course, this familiar environment is only HALF of the concept for Harry Potter. The other half, of course, is WITCHCRAFT AND WIZARDRY. Which brings us to the 2nd element of a successful story concept, which will be the subject of the next post.

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♡sneaking a kiss when everyone’s eyes are closed 😜😘

*bonus - when hanbin tries again 😂😂😂

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Finally. A reason to live again.