lesbian slang

you guys!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! im so excited i just watched an irish sapphic film!!! it’s called “a date for mad mary” and it’s got a happy ending!! also very strong accents so if you are not irish you may need subtitles. Seriously though what better day to watch an Irish movie than the 17th of march. Here’s to a Very Gay St Patrick’s Day!!

Listen...

Strange women popping out of ponds distributing afterlives is no basis for character development. Having a life generally derives from actually staying alive, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony.

You can’t expect to have a literal flipping hole blasted in you and then be a-okay just ‘cause some watery tart got her tears on you!

I mean, if I went around saying I wasn’t dead just because some moistened bint had looked at me with stars in her eyes, they’d put me away!

youtube

Gay Men React to Lesbian Slang

from ElloSteph’s YouTube

In America They Call Us Dykes: Notes On The Etymology And Usage Of "Dyke"

From Sinister Wisdom # 9 1979

By JR Roberts

The women-loving women
in America were called dykes
and some liked it
and some did not . ..
Judy Grahn, from “A History of Lesbianism”

In Sinister Wisdom 6, five Lesbians spoke intensely and articulately concerning the silences in our lives and how patriarchal language has been used
against us, how the fears of vulnerability and censure check our tongues,
rendering us powerless, isolated, and invisible . How the power to name is the
power to be. Lesbians have long been the object of vicious “name-calling”
designed to shut us up, make us shrivel and slink away. Dyke is one of the
words that has been negatively and violently flung at us for more than a
half century . In the Lesbian/Feminist 1970s, we broke the silence on this
tabooed word, reclaiming it for ourselves, assigning to it positive, political
values. The reclamation of dyke has also necessarily involved an historical/
etymological search for its origins. Our generation of Lesbians has been stymied, mystified, and intensely curious as to how and why we have come to
call ourselves dykes.

The term appears to have originated in the United States. Although dyke
is used in England, the terms lesbian, Sapphist, and butch have been traditional there (Partridge 1968). In the United States, dyke is a cross-cultural term found in both Anglo-American and African-American slang. In African-American slang, dyke, as it stands alone, does not seem to have been in widespread use as of 1970, but more commonly appeared in combination with bull to form bull-dyke, signifying an “aggressive female homosexual,” bull-dagger, boon-dagger, and bull-diker being variations. Bull was/is used in Black culture to indicate Lesbian (Major 1970; Berry ‘1972).(1)

The earliest known references using dyke or dike (an earlier? spelling no
longer in wide usage today) to describe “masculine” Lesbians, or Lesbians
generally, date to circa 1920s·1930s, indicating at least a half century of
usage.(2) Partridge indicates that dike denotes a “female homosexual” and that the term comes from the combination bull-dike (Partridge 1968), which
was used among Black people as early as circa 1920s-1930s (AC/DC Blues
1977). Godfrey Irwin, a compiler of tramp and underworld slang, likewise
supports this definition of bull-dike in a letter to Partridge dated September
18, 1937. During the thirties, bull-dike was also being used among prison
inmates at Sing Sing to indicate a woman who practiced oral sex on men
(Haragan 1935, as quoted by Partridge 1968). It is interesting that the homosexual bull-dike and the heterosexual bull-dike were both associated with
so-called “unnatural” and socially unapproved sexual behaviors . This is one
of many connections existing between homosexual slang, heterosexual slang,
and woman-hating slang.(3) By the 1940s we find dike or dyke listed in slang
dictionaries to indicate “masculine woman,” being synonymous with other
words signifying “Lesbian” (Berrey & Van Den Bark 1942 , 1947).

In the pre-Liberation forties, fifties , and sixties, “Lesbian slang” was often
role-related. Dyke/dike and butch were used to signify “masculine” Lesbians
who wore “men’s clothing” (Stanley , June 24 , 1977; Aldrich 1955 :54) .
“Feminine” Lesbians were femmes or fluffs (Vice Versa 1:6, November 1947).
Among Midwest Black Lesbians the words stud and fish were used respectively (Sawyer 1965). Special terms indicating varying degrees of “mannishness” were formed by adding prefixes, for example : bull-dyke, diesel dyke,
stompin ’ diesel dyke. As Lesbian linguist Julia Stanley indicates, dyke in our
own time, the Lesbian/Feminist seventies, has undergone a change in meaning from a once pejorative term to a politically charged definition. This has occurred within the liberation movements of Lesbians and gays. “To be a
dyke or a faggot,” writes Julia , “refers to one ’s political identity as a gay
activist . .. but redefining old terms that have been pejoratives for so long
is not an easy process, nor is it something that takes place overnight. Among
women, new definitions are being made among usages of old terms. As we
redefine the old pejorative labels making them our own, what we choose to
call ourselves also takes on political meaning, defining one’s political position”
(Stanley 1974:390-391).

The personal is political. The personal is also historical. On many levels
we Lesbians today have experienced historical/political transformations.
Sometimes it is possible to recall an exact time and place where transformations occurred. Although I don’t ever recall having used the word dyke in the old pejorative sense, I do remember when I first began using dyke in a liberated sense. It was late 1973; I had just “come out” via the Lesbian/
Feminist Movement. During a conversation with an older Lesbian friend who
had come out years earlier without the aid of a movement, I referred to the
two of us as dykes . Her reaction was equivalent to “Hey, wait a minute!
Watch yer mouth!”, as if I had uttered some terrible obscenity . She then
proceeded to enlighten me as to the older, negative meaning . But, I said, I
don’t see it that way at all. To me dyke is positive; it means a strong, independent Lesbian who can take care of herself. As I continued with the movement, dyke took on even stronger political implications than “activist.” It
signified woman-identified culture, identity, pride and strength - women, alone and together, who live consciously and deliberately autonomous lives ,
no longer seeking definitions or approvals according to male values. Soon
my older friend also began identifying positively with the word dyke.

Exercising this new power of self-definition, we now have a variety of
names and definitions with which to describe our many political selves. Our
Lesbian lifestyle is very diverse, and our use of language and choice of names
and definitions reflect our many cultural, racial, ethnic, class, regional, and
political backgrounds, as well as our generational perspectives. Today the
straight world continues to use dyke in the old pejorative sense. There are a
number of Lesbians who do also, and are repulsed by it. These Lesbians may
not have been exposed to the current movement, or, being concerned with
their status and survival in the straight world, they may reject the term as
harmful. There is also a segment of the Lesbian population which grew up ,
came out , and participated in the earlier Lesbian culture before 1970 who
retain the negative definition they have always known . So the definition of
dyke has changed only for some Lesbians, not for all.

There are some questions to be wondered about. If dyke has different
definitions today, is it possible that there were different definitions in earlier
times? Did all Lesbians before the 1970s generally define dyke negatively?
Was it such a distasteful term, or were there those Lesbians who felt a sense
of pride at being labeled dyke? What did it mean to them? Where did the
American tradition of the “mannish” Lesbian as dike/dyke come from?
The term dike or dyke had probably been around to some extent before
the 1930s-1940s when it first began to be documented in slang dictionaries.
Slang terms often originate among special groups, some of which are “outcasts” of mainstream society whose members feel alienated from the values of the dominant culture. Such groupings may be based on age, race, ethnic, or class background. Among such groups have been the younger generation, Blacks, hoboes, criminals, street people, artists and writers, gays and Lesbians.

The creation of new words and new definitions for old words serves a social
and political purpose: it may constitute an act of power and rebellion for
those who feel and are powerless; or it may provide a sense of validation
and identity denied by the dominant culture, thus becoming a source of
social/cultural cohesion and pride - a language of one’s own. A new language
helps to articulate a new society. Some slang terms may even be adopted
by the dominant culture, eventually becoming “Standard English,” or they
may fall into disuse or remain the linguistic property of the special group.
Slang terms may be collected and listed in published lexicons, dictionaries ,
and thesauri. Definitions may change with time. These are slow, complicated
evolutions influenced by social, economic, political, and intellectual ideas
and events in the dominant culture and among those outcast groups.

Currently, there are several theories concerning the etymology of dyke or
dike, which are threaded together by the androgynous concept of the “manly-
woman.” Several have to do with ancient Greek legends. Poet Elsa Gidlow
raises the possibility that the word dyke may have had its origins in the
Greek word dike, that is Athene , the “manly-woman ” who is the principle
of total order (Stanley , June 24, 1977). There is also the related Flexner and
Wentworth (1975) hypothesis that dike probably came from hermaphrodite,the -dite being “clipped” off and later evolving into dike, due to a regional
(Coney Island??) mispronunciation. Cordova adds support to this hypothesis
when she reports conversations with older Lesbians who indicate the folk belief that the root word of dyke was once hermaphrodite, with its origins in
the Greek myth of Hermes and Aphrodite who join to create the androgynous
creature (Cordova 1974:22). Of the -dite to dike theory, Julia Stanley comments: “For reasons of my own, I’ve never bought the -dite to dike explanation, primarily because /t/ hardly ever becomes /k/ in natural languages. I’m not saying it’s impossible, especially in an unstressed syllable, where an alveolar might be heard as a velar, just that it’s unlikely” (Stanley, June 24, 1977).

My own recent research has turned up an interesting, but never before
cited, usage of dike dating from late nineteenth and early twentieth century
America, representing another possible, and perhaps more viable, origin, based in the social customs of the people rather than in classical allusion. Both
Schele de Vere (1871) and Clapin (1902) in their compilations of Americanisms indicate dike as denoting a man in full dress, or merely the set of male
clothing itself. Schele de Vere says this is a “peculiar American cant term,
as yet unexplained.” Clapin, however, indicates that dike likely resulted from
the corruption of the Old English dight (Anglo-Saxon origin). Dight meant
to dress, clothe; to adorn, deck oneself (Johnson, 2nd ed., 1827). In listing
dike, Mathews (1951) indicates a possible connection between dight and the
English dialect dick, both of which meant “to deck or adorn.” By 1856
dight was cited by Hall as being nearly obsolete in the United States, while
diked and diked out were in use. The word dike probably came to America
with the English at the time of colonization, but once in America other
usages may have developed . Both Clapin and Schele de Vere indicate that
dike was not only used as a verb, but also as a noun to describe a person of
either sex who was all dressed up. However, dike as a person or as a set of
clothing most often referred to the male sex.

There is growing evidence that during this same time period a number of
women in both the United States and Europe were adopting male attire, both
permanently and on occasion. Katz has called some of these women “Passing
Women” (Katz 1976: Ch. 3). These women dressed, lived, voted, worked -
literally “passed”-as men in the mainstream culture. Some were of the middle
and upper classes, or were artists. Others were independent, working class
women who took on the guise of men in order to survive in a world where
women had few options. As “men,” these women, some of whom were Lesbians, married other women and raised families. They could live and enjoy
their lives with women and still participate in the greater opportunities and privileges awarded to men. This choice was often based in explicit or covert
feminism. When discovered, however, these women were often punished by
society- arrested, fined, imprisoned, exposed, and forbidden to wear male
clothing. Sometimes the contemporary media picked up on the appearances
of these “she-men,” and a number of rather sensational articles appeared.
accompanied by photographs and drawings. Some of these graphics which
are reproduced in Katz indicate women dressed in a “full set of male clothing” - from hat to suit, to cane or umbrella, watch fobs and chains, to vests
and shoes. Lesbians and other radical women - such as the feminist Mary C. Walker, Harriet Hosmer, and Edmonia Lewis, the Black/Native American sculptor-were also dressing in much the same manner in the United States and Europe, not especially for the purpose of “passing” as men, but for the real and implied emotional, political, and social freedoms inherent in the male costume.
This radical expression of emancipation (which has centuries of tradition behind it) continued well into the twentieth century and included both women of color and white women.

It seems possible that in the American culture where the term dike denoted “the full set of male clothing” or “a man in full dress,” this term could also have been applied to women who dressed in such clothing. Possibly these early radical women, dressing and passing in male clothing, both permanently and on occasion, were in fact our first dike sisters in America.

Again, Julia Stanley, who feels that the above etymology for dyke is the
most viable she has heard, comments: “Your proposed etymology doesn’t
exclude the possibility that Wentworth and Flexner were correct in their
hypothesis. That is, you may have come up with the 'missing link’ in the
semantic development of the word dyke, since it is stretching it a bit to re-
late it to the Germanic ditch” (Stanley, June 24,1977).

If my hypothesis is correct, it could further be proposed that the meaning
of dike was changing during the time period from the late nineteenth century
to circa 1930s-1940s, that dike had begun passing from a predominantly
positive male and/or neutral meaning to a derogatory female slang term.
Linguistically, it may have gone through a process called “degeneration of
meaning.” By the 1930s dike, preceded by the equally tabooed bull, had
been assigned sexual and derogatory meanings which could be applied both
to Lesbians and to heterosexual women practicing tabooed sexual behaviors.
By the 1940s-1950s-1960s the pejorative term dike/dyke was almost exclusively applied to “masculine” Lesbians, with other meanings becoming more obscure, though not yet obsolete. Linguists have found that this “process of degeneration” is a pattern often occurring to words which make such a male
to female transition.

For this same period of possible linguistic change, there is growing evidence
indicating a general altering of attitudes toward women’s relationships with each other.(4) Increasingly more negative aspects were being assigned to such relationships in the twentieth century than had been assigned them in the
nineteenth century. Medical and psychiatric science was labeling such relationships “unnatural,” “degenerate,” and “sick.” All manner of “masculine”
characteristics of both a biological and psychological nature were attached
to Lesbian women, as well as to other women who “deviated” from traditional , “god-given,” (male-defined) “ female roles.” Speculating once again -
since words and their meanings are used to reinforce the values of a given
society, it may be that the linguistic change described above was related to
the social/political change concerning definitions of Lesbianism and female
sex roles. If a concept is assigned negative values, then the language used to
describe that concept will also assume negative meaning. The language becomes a vehicle by which the value is perpetuated. Thus dike, once used to
describe a well-dressed male, becomes a vulgar and hateful epithet to be
hurled at women who rebel against confining roles and dress styles.

It is interesting to note how our “new” radical definitions echo the “old” radical traditions as signified by the term dike/dyke. Betty Birdfish, a friend
in Chicago , wrote to me about a Lesbian dance to be held there, and how
"wimmin are talking about 'dyking themselves up’ for it.” In my next letter,
I asked Betty exactly what that meant-“dyking ourselves up.” She responded :

About 'dyking ourselves up’: I think it can mean a whole lot of things.
In general, dressing up so one feels most beautiful, most proud of herself. I’ve seen that take many forms in the dyke community, at events.
For example, Allison with her hair in corn rows and beads, wearing African garb. Or Jogie with a tuxedo and panama hat. Or Beverly looking like
a gypsy with loose-flowing clothes, jewelry, scarves and wearing scented
oil. Or wimmin with tailored blazers and slacks and vests. Or even wimmin
with long-flowing ankle length skirts or dresses. Many interpretations.
Many expressions. For me 'dyking myself up’ has been getting more definite in its expression lately . For the dance I wore a pair of high-waisted
black slacks, a white shirt with tie and pin, and a black satin, double-breasted, padded-shouldered, very tailored, old jacket. I felt very strong
and beautiful in it. Before the dance, I had 'practiced’ dyking myself up
in a more radical way: I put on a different long sleeve shirt with collar
and a silk tie that has wimmin together painted on it. I put my hair up in
a bun, very close to my head so that it looked short, and put on a 'mannish’ (I wish I had another word) straw hat. I looked like old-timey photos
of Lesbians who you know had longer hair, who put it up, dyked up in
suits, waistcoats, or tuxedos . I liked the way I looked, but wasn’t ready
to go 'out’ yet in full dyke array. So I modified it for the dance . For me,
'dyking up’ means the tailored suit: elegant, comfortable and strong. I
guess I don’t see this wear as just a 'masculine ’ privilege - but clothing that
wimmin/dykes can wear to feel good in. I think I’m no longer as afraid
of feeling 'butchy’: to work on my body , to develop muscles and strength,
to be more active physically (sports , karate, etc.), to move with more
force, strength, confidence. I’m realizing how stifled I’ve been by society
which condemns this development in wimmin . And I realize how our own dyke community continues to condemn it by labelling it 'butchy’ and
therefore 'male-identified’ and therefore wrong. I don’t care anymore
(in my head-but not yet in my gut) about all those condemnations-I want to grow in ways I know I’ve always wanted to.
(Betty Birdfish, August 4, 1977)

For the Lesbian of yesteryear, getting “diked up” may have had the same
exhilarating, liberating, and fearful effects it has for contemporary Lesbians,
but even more so since few women at that time wore pants. To wear “male
clothing” before the advent of trousers for women and the so-called “unisex”
fashions of today, was indeed radical and revolutionary. It signified a rebellion against male-defined roles for women, which “women’s clothing” symbolized and perpetuated by rendering women passive, dependent, confined, and vulnerable. Yet this autonomous act of rebellion also made women vulnerable to punishment, ridicule, and ostracism.(5)

Dike/dyke need not remain a vulgar epithet of self-hate, shame, and
negativism, a term signifying “masculine.” This is the definition which a
heterosexist, dyke-hating society has formulated and which many Lesbians
past and present have unquestioningly accepted. By defining some of us as
“men” and some of us as “women,” society has sought to divide us, to create
inequality based on heterosexual roles, thereby defusing the political power
of women loving women, reducing it to a pseudo-heterosexuality which,
according to their thinking, is both artificial and inferior to the “real thing.”
Dike/dyke still remains a word hidden in history. But this new etymology
suggests the possibility of some quite radical origins. Rather than wincing
at the word dyke, we might better remember and commemorate those early
Lesbians and feminists who refused “women’s clothing” and “women’s roles.”
They may have been our first dyke sisters.


Notes

(1)Bull was a tabooed word circa early twentieth century, not to be used in mixed company, signifying “the male of the species,” Less offensive terms like “top cow” were often substituted. Bull bitch was a rural term applied to “masculine” women (Wentworth 1944; Wentworth and Flexner 1975).

(2) Earlier, at the turn of the century, dyke was one of many slang terms denoting the vulva (Farmer and Henley 1890-1904 : 338).

(3)See “Sexist Slang and the Gay Community: Are You One, Too?” by Julia Stanley and Susan W. Robbin s. Available from 1. Stanley , Department of English, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln , Nebraska 68588.

(4) See Carroll Smith Rosenberg , “Th e Female World of Love and Ritual : Relations between Women in Nineteenth Century America,” Signs I : I (Autumn 1975) : 1-19 ; AIice Echols, “The Demise of Female Intimacy in the Nineteenth Century or There wasn’t a Dyke in the Land,’” unpublished paper, n .d .. 34 pp.

(5) It should be noted that these vulnerabilities were not experienced by women only in nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. As late as 1968, Lesbians were being arrested in Dallas and Houston, Texas for wearing “men’s clothing.” See: “Special Release to the Ladder.” The Ladder 13: ½ (October/November 1968):4041; “Who Can Tell Boys from Girls.” The Ladder 13: ½ (October/November 1968) :41-42

SOURCES
AC/DC Blues: Gay Jazz Reissues, Vol. l. St-l06, Stash Records, Mattituck, New York,1977.

Aldrich, Ann. We Walk Alone. New York: Fawcett, 1955.

Berrey, Lester V. and Van den Bark, Melvin. American Thesaurus of Slang. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1942, 1947.

Berry, Leonard J.Prison. N.p.: Subsistence Press, 1972.

Betty Birdfish (Alwin). Letter to JR Roberts. Chicago, Illinois (August 4,1977). Collection of JR Roberts.

Clapin, Sylva. A New Dictionary of Americanisms. New York: Louis Weiss, 1902.

Cordova, Jeanne. “What’s in a Name?” Lesbian Tide (June 1974):21-22 .

Farmer, 1.S. and Henley , W.E. Slang and Its Analogues (J890-1904) . Reprinted ed. , New York: Arno Press, 1970.

Hall, Benjamin H. A Collection of College Words and Customs. 2nd ed. Cambridge: John Bartlett, 1856 (1851). Reprinted ed ., Detroit: Gale Research, 1968.

Hargan, James. “The Psychology of Prison Language.” Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology 30 (1935):359-365. (Note: the “more unprintable expressions” such as bull-dike were omitted from the published list, but were available upon request to those who were “especially interested in the subject.”)

Johnson , Samuel. A Dictionary of the English Language. 3 vols. 2nd ed. London: Longman , Rees, Orne, Brown, and Green et al., 1827.

Katz, Jonathan. Gay American History: Lesbians and Gay Men in the U.S.A . New York:Thomas Y. Crowell, 1976. Pb., Avon, 1978.

Major, Clarence. Dictionary of Afro·American Slang. New York : International Publishers,1970.

Mathews, Mitford. A Dictionary of Americanisms on Historical Principles. 2 vols. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951.

Partridge, Eric. A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English. 7th ed. 1967; Supplement 1970. New York: MacMillan, 1970.

Partridge, Eric. A Dictionary of the Underworld. 3rd ed. London : Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd., 1968.

Schele de Vere, Maximillian. Americanisms: The English of the New World. New York: Charles Scribner and Co., 1872.

Stanley, Julia P. Letter to JR Roberts. Lincoln, Nebraska (June 24, 1977). Collection of JR Roberts.

Stanley, Julia P. “When We Say 'Out of the Closets!’” College English (November 1974): 385-39l.

Sawyer, Ethel. “Study of a Public Lesbian Community.” Masters Thesis, Washington University. St. Louis, Missouri. 1965 .

Vice Versa 1:6 (November 1947) . (Includes discussion of role-related slang; examined by Elizabeth Bouvier at the Homosexual Information Center Library, Hollywood, Calif.)

Wentworth, Harold. American Dialect Dictionary. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1944.

Wentworth, Harold and Flexner, Stuart B. Dictionary of American Slang. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1975.

Brazilian-Portuguese LGBT+ Slang

So, like I said earlier, I wanted to do a BR-PT LGBT+ slang post and here I am! I, particularly, uses these slangs all the time on internet and outside it with my friends. That’s going to be a long post, since it has some cultural explanations, but I hope you enjoy it.

Before I start it, I want to say some important things:

1. Some of these slangs can be considered rude and offensive depending on who is using them (ex: heterosexuals) and how you say them, but they are widely used by LGBT+. The fact is, some of these slangs are or were used in an offensive way by homophobes and now, LGBT+ people use it as a way of showing they should not be offensive terms. I’ll highlight every term that is inside this category.

 

2. Brazil is a very wide country and some terms might not be used in some regions. Some of them must even use a term with more than one meaning, but I cannot possibly know all of them.

 

3. Most of the terms are often used mostly on the internet and were also originated on it. Nowadays, there’s a Facebook group called LDRV (as in Lana Del Rei Vevo) that creates and spreads a lot of LGBT+ slang words. If you have a Brazilian friend, especially a LGBT+ one, ask if the person knows it. If you can join it, that’s even better, but someone inside must invite you, since it’s a secret group. There’s about 500,000 ppl in it.

 

4. Some of the terms are LGB because of the lack of representation of T+ people on LGBT+ groups and because a) I’m bisexual myself b) I don’t know many T+ people, either inside or outside of internet. So I’m sorry in advance!

So, let’s begin!

Gíria: slang

Vale dos homossexuais: it means “valley of the homosexuals”. It’s a fictional place (or not) where there only exists homosexuals, often used in a sense of paradise. It also can be used to say that yourself or another person is LGBT+. It’s more common to use only the word “Vale”, instead of the whole term. Some examples:

A: Você é do vale? Are you from the valley?

B: Eu sou do vale sim, graças a Deus! Yeah, thank God I’m from the valley! (Brazilians also use Thank God as an expression a lot)

Aquela menina ali é do vale, com certeza. That girl over there is from the valley, I’m sure.

Bicha: it means something similar to the English bee (like honey bee idk english LGBT+ slangs). Instead of using the name of the person, you can use bicha. It can be used either with women, men or with others, basically with anyone that’s not too older. Some examples:

Bicha, você tá linda hoje! Bicha, you’re beautiful today! (also, instead of você, you can use its shorter form, )

Aquela bicha é chata demais. That bicha is too boring.


Bicha, para que tá feio!: this is an expression that uses the word bicha and it’s used a lot. “Para que tá feio” would be literally translated as “stop, because it’s ugly”, and it means that someone should stop doing something because it’s getting or already is socially awkward or because it’s something that shouldn’t be said/done. For example, when someone LGBT+ is talking something bad about T+ people (y know, it happens quite a lot), you can say “Bicha, para que tá feio!”.

NOTE: Bicha is one of the terms I was talking about on the notice number 2. If someone who’s heterosexual (and this heterosexual person is not acknowledged not homophobe by LGBT+ people), the term gets offensive.


Sapão: literally it means “big frog”. It’s used to say that someone is very hot. Some examples:

Bicha, olha aquele sapão ali! Que maravilhoso! Bicha, look at that sapão over there! So hot!

Aquele seu amigo é muito sapão. That friend of yours is very sapão.

There are some derivations of sapão, such as:

Sapinho: literally “little frog”. Someone that’s somewhat beautiful and not that hot. Sometimes it’s used when someone is surprisingly beautiful. Example: Aquele seu amigo é um sapinho até. That friend of yours is quite sapinho (surprisingly beautiful)

Girino: it means “tadpole”. Used in the same way as sapinho.

Sapatão: literally translated as “big shoes”. It has the same meaning as “lesbian”. There’s also another word for lesbian, which is “Sapa”, that literally means “female frog”.

NOTE: Sapatão can also be used as something offensive in the same terms of what I wrote in bicha.

NOTE 2: To say that some girl is beautiful, SAPONA (lit. big female frog) can be used, in the same way that Sapão is used.


Sambou: the past form of the verb “sambar” (to dance the samba dance). It’s used when someone did something good, amazing (surprisingly or not). There are some synonyms, such as Pisou (past form of the verb “pisar”, to step on), Tombou (past form of “tombar”) and Lacrou (past form of “lacrar”, but the actual meaning of lacrar is different). Some examples:

Sua amiga sambou na discussão com aquele homofóbico! Your friend sambou in that discussion with that homophobe! (she did great in that discussion, it felt like she won it)

Pabllo Vitar* lacrou na Parada Gay! Pabllo Vitar lacrou in the Gay Parade (her concert in the Gay Prade was great)

 

* Pabllo Vitar is a Brazilian Drag Queen pop singer. Her most popular song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HT1LTv5FHTY

 

That’s all for today. There’s much more, but I don’t want this post to be longer than it already is. If people enjoy it, I can make more of it. J

anonymous asked:

Do you guys know where I can find a Good List of lesbian/wlw slang??? Sometimes I just feel like bad lesbian because I don't know lots of stuff :'0

No I actually don’t, i looked online and the ones I found were pretty shitty and had things like ‘gold star lesbian’ on and other things like that. If any of our followers could help out anon that would be great! Also don’t feel bad, I’m pretty clueless as wellI but I’m sure we’ll pick stuff up as we go along haha💗

FUSION: “In lesbian love relationships, an intense intimacy between the two partners that causes them to be over-involved in each other. The result is that the differences between the two seem to be lessened, and each partner’s ability to maintain and independent identity is weakened. Often blamed for lesbian bed death, or loss of sexual desire. Also called merging.”
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Autostraddle.com “21 More Lesbian Slang Terms You’ve Probably Never Heard Before”


@crochetscribe the Supergirl thing mainly refers to the “supercorp” ship (and she is sadly canonically straight as far as I know)
I’m not into comics (#fakenerdboy) and I mostly only know about superheroes that reach movies, TV series etc; so I literally know nothing about batgirl and my attempts to Google my shit before I post it failed miserably, so thank you for answering 💖
@some-bear-out-there you see… I’m such a fake nerd boy I don’t know shit about oracle or Dinah. Thank you for your attention anyways 💖
(Generally, I’m just trying to stop myself from screaming into the void about how h&m keeps using lesbian slang wrong, and trying to see queer positive)

To expand on the idea that homophobia is a compound oppression (gay people are hated both for being attracted to the same-sex and for not being attracted to the opposite sex) - I also think gay men and lesbians experience this compound oppression differently. Gay men are mainly hated for their attraction to men, and lesbians are mainly hated for their lack of attraction to men.
(And I think the idea that lesbians are more hated for their attraction to women than for not wanting men stems from the facts that a) male homosexuality is the paradigm and all understandings of homophobia revolve around gay men’s experience of it, and b) bi women love reinforcing this idea as it means we’re pretty much exactly the same as them and we’re just being mean gatekeepers when we try to keep our spaces and words to ourselves).

Don’t get me wrong, of course we’re hated for both components, but if I had to pick one that really drives the hatred, then yeah, as @exclusionaryhomosexual puts it, “Manloving is the gay male sin, not manloving is the lesbian’s.” I mean sure, parents of gay sons will go on about the fact that their son won’t marry a woman and give them grandchildren in the normal straight way, but on a societal scale gay men are not punished for not loving women the way lesbians are punished for not loving men. They are not accused of being inherently “woman-hating”.
Heterosexuality is the default sexuality and men are the default human, so lesbian sexuality is demonised for being male-exclusionary while gay men’s sexuality is demonised for being male-inclusionary. It’s telling that in my country the main slur against gay men is a slang word for pedophile (it’s about their attraction to men, trying to make it sound inherently perverted) while the main slur against lesbians is a slang word for whore (it’s about their lack of attraction to men, as historically a whore was any woman not tied to a man.)

youtube

GAY MEN REACT TO LESBIAN SLANG with Kingsley, Soundlyawake, Ryan Minaj, and Doug Jensen

reasons to watch buffy

- strong female characters

- strong male characters

- realistic characters

- a lot of romance

- but also strong friendships

- supernatural stuff

- kickass fight scenes

- really super funny

- but it will also rip your heart out and stomp on it

- not afraid to experiment with story lines

- musical episode, silent episode, episode filmed mostly from the point of view of a character, episode that takes place in dreams, etc.

- a lot of really famous actors are in it before they were famous

- really good dialogue

- amazing continuity and foreshadowing

- special effects aren’t great, but it’s so good it doesn’t need them

- 90s fashion and slang

- realistic lesbian relationships

- has a spinoff series

- everyone is really attractive

please just do yourself a favor and watch buffy please j u s t  d o  i t