les-vacances-de-mr-hulot

“Demandez-vous d'où vient, à la fin des Vacances de Monsieur Hulot, cette grande tristesse, ce désenchantement démesuré, et vous découvrirez peut-être que c'est du silence. Tout au long du film, les cris des enfants qui jouent accompagnent inévitablement les vues de la plage, et pour la première fois leur silence signifie la fin des vacances.”
André Bazin, 1953

328 - Mr Hulot’s Holiday (1953, Jacques Tati)

Watched this on TV tonight! Can’t remember the last time I watched a movie on TV. And I didn’t even scout it out, Dad did. He’d never heard of Tati of course, but as soon as he said “Hulot?” I filled him in and decided we would watch it. I was feeling like rubbish tonight and it turned out to be the perfect thing. My family members weren’t fans but I think it helped when I dropped my knowledge down whenever I could. And I enjoyed it so whatever, right? It was relaxing.  

Nautilus Art Prints To Release Mon Oncle Print By Tom Whalen & Les Vacances de Mr Hulot Print By David Merveille On May 1, 2015

Nautilus Art Prints To Release Mon Oncle Print By Tom Whalen & Les Vacances de Mr Hulot Print By David Merveille On May 1, 2015

Following the recent release of Jacques Tati’s François à l’Américaine, by Laurent Durieux, Nautilus Art Prints is happy to present its next two screen prints in this great Tati series: Mon Oncle, by Tom Whalen and Les Vacances de Mr Hulot by David Merveille.

Nautilus Art Prints is proud to pay homage to Jacques Tati’s Mr Hulot, in collaboration with les Films de Mon Oncle. On May 1, 2015, both…

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Nautilus Art Prints Announce Two New Jacques Tati Prints By Tom Whalen And David Merveille

Following the recent release of Jacques Tati’s François à l’Américaine, by Laurent Durieux, Nautilus Art Prints is happy to present its next two screen prints in this great Tati series: Mon Oncle, by Tom Whalen and Les Vacances de Mr Hulot by David Merveille.

Mr Hulot, Jacques Tati’s second self, is one of the most endearing characters of 20th century cinema and 60 years after his debut on the big screen it is still easy to connect with him. With a constantly changing society, rapidly advancing technologies how can we, like him, not feel completely giddy?

Nautilus Art Prints is proud to pay homage to Jacques Tati’s Mr Hulot, in collaboration with les Films de Mon Oncle. As from 1 May 2015, both screen prints will be exclusively available at www.nautilus-artprints.com




Jacques Tati (born Jacques Tatischeff) was a French filmmaker. Throughout his long career, he worked as a comic actor, writer, and director. In a poll conducted by Enter-tainment Weekly of the Greatest Movie Directors, Tati was voted the 46th greatest of all time. With only six feature-length films to his credit as director, he directed fewer films than any other director on this list of 50. 

In early 1946 Jacques Tati and Fred Orain founded the production company Cady-Films, which would produce Tati’s first three films; Jour de fête (The Big Day), Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot (Mr. Hulot’s Holiday) and  Mon Oncle (My Uncle).

Tati played the gauche and socially inept lead character, Monsieur Hulot. With his trademark raincoat, umbrella and pipe, Hulot is among the most memorable comic characters in cinema.




Both Mon Oncle, by Tom Whalen and Les Vacances de Mr Hulot by David Merveille will be exclusively available at www.nautilus-artprints.com on the 1st of May 2015.

You can find more about Nautilus Art Prints and buy some of their great artwork over on their website and store. You can also keep up to date with all of their news via Twitter and Facebook.

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Martine’s holiday with windows. (Mr Hulot’s Holiday, Tati, 1953)

Portrayed by Nathalie Pascaud.
Pascaud’s real name was/is Jacqueline Schillio and besides being a friend of a friend of Tati, she was a so called neophyte - a beginner. I doubt she took acting lessons of some kind, never read info on that one. Pascaud did act in one or two others movies afterwards, so it seems.
Her husband received a role -as Monsieur Schmutz- because Pascaud did not want to part from her husband during the filming of Les Vacances, and Tati did want her for the role.

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The English-language version of Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot begins with a warning: “Don’t look for a plot, for a holiday is meant purely for fun.”
The film does not feature a plot in the traditional sense of a novel or short story, but presents recurring themes, episodes, and characters that bear more of a resemblance to poetic structure. The film is also noted for Tati’s use of wide-angle cinematic framing, in which a motionless camera captures the action without following the actors or cutting to close ups that emphasize the jokes and actors’ reactions.

Pictures: on set photography from Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot (1953) Jacques Tati and Nathalie Pascaud (stage name)

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Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot, on set photography.

Jacques Tati, 1953

“Mr. Hulot is full of grace; he is a kind of angel, and the disorder that he brings is one filled with freedom and exuberance as well as compassion.”
Bert Cardullo on Les Vacances de Mr. Hulot

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Mr. Hulot is full of grace; he is a kind of angel, and the disorder that he brings is one filled with freedom and exuberance as well as compassion. “
-Bert Cardullo on Les Vacances de Mr. Hulot-

‎"Demandez-vous d'où vient, à la fin des Vacances de Monsieur Hulot, cette grande tristesse, ce désenchantement démesuré, et vous découvrirez peut-être que c'est du silence. Tout au long du film, les cris des enfants qui jouent accompagnent inévitablement les vues de la plage, et pour la première fois leur silence signifie la fin des vacances.”
-André Bazin, 1953-

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“Like all of the very great comics, before making us laugh, Tati creates a universe. A world arranges itself around his character, crystallizes like a supersaturated solution around a grain of salt. Certainly the character created by Tati is funny, but almost accessorily, and in any case always relative to the universe. He can be personally absent from the most comical gags, for M. Hulot is only the metaphysical incarnation of a disorder that is perpetuated long after his passing.”
(André Bazin translated from: “M. Hulot et le temps,” 1953, in Qu’est-ce que le cinéma?, vol. I)

Stills: Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot (Tati, 1953)

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Drawing/Lithografie by Jacques Lagrange, 1953 & movie still from Tati’s Les Vacances de Mr. Hulot.
Lagrange (1917-1995) was closely involved with Jacques Tati’s films from 1953 until Tati’s death in 1982, doing credited and uncredited screenplay work and set design.

Les Vacances was first released in 1953. Then, in the early 60s, Tati re-edited the film, cutting out shots and extending others. He had Alain Romans’ score re-orchestrated and overhauled the music and sound mixing. It was at this point that he also added the final color shot of the stamp and postmark, indicating the postman’s invisible hand. Later, in 1977, a delighted new generation discovered the film. Encouraged by this new success and inspired by Steven Spielberg’s Jaws, Tati shot new footage on the beach at St-Marc-sur-Mer, which he then cut into the last version in 1978.

Source: ARCHIVES LES FILMS DE MON ONCLE

Now part of private collection of Hyacinthe Moreau Lalande.