leprou

in an episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm , Larry David stops goin to his shrink because he saw the shrink on the beach wearing a frikin rainbow thong and like the sight of that scarred him for life he was so turned off by it so he lied to the shrink he was happy and had to let him go and I was thinking like I have so many proverbial “rainbow thongs” I’m an asshol like if someone listens to Drake or Coldplay or wears Ed Hardy or looks like kyle jenner instagram makeup or has an undercut hairdo or likes fight club and inception shite or quotes self help book about positivity or sm basic shit my brain screams RAINBOW THONG I need to perish to get away.. but then again certain qualities about me are probably also rainbow thong as well like if someone says me to my skin is too leprous and I’m too ugle to look at head on or that I need to shut up abt crusty 100 year old actors I’ll be like it’s ok that’s a rainbow thong 2 u it’s chill I’ll move to Antarctica to not disturb u.. we all have our rainbow thongs some days everything is a rainbow thong

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The only thing worse than fighting in a medieval battle is trying to fight it with leprosy

Italian archaeologists working in a medieval cemetery of Campochiaro in Central Italy excavated hundreds of graves that date to between the 6th and 8th centuries A.D.  In an article published a few years ago, the archaeologists describe the remains of a “leper warrior” who was 161cm (or 5’3”) tall and was more than 50 years old when he died.  When the researchers examined this soldier’s skeleton they found indications of sharp force trauma to his forehead, osteoarthritis in his spine, and leprous destruction to the bones of his face, hands, and feet.

Read more at StrangeRemains.

flickr

·el irlandés· (iPhone) by Aaron leprou
Via Flickr:
the irish Tarragona

Still cracks me up that the Kirkpatrick family crest is a bloodied knife and has the motto “I’ll Make Sure”.

Sounds powerful and strong, ni? Well, let me tell you a funny story about Robert the Bruce (yes, the whiny dude with the leprous dad in Braveheart, for those of you unfamiliar with our history) and his best pal and that one time they killed John Comyn (the guy who technically had a stronger claim to the throne of Scotland) and got themselves excommunicated.

So Bruce meets Comyn in a Church to ‘talk’ about the fact that Comyn had supposedly betrayed our Boab to Ed I (aka King Evil English Twat in Braveheart). All fine and dandy and a safe space you’d think. WRONG. These are Scots nobles. Occasionally, they will fight (see Scottish History 101 - aka all of Scottish history). So they start pushing each other around and things get heated and Robert the freaking Bruce, our great and noble patriot, shanks his second-ish-removed cousin at the freaking altar.

Dear old Boab promptly rushes out and tells his friends “Uh, lads. Made a critical error” but isn’t sure his cous is actually, y’know, dead, because if he is - and in a Church - that’s super-awkward and heresy/blasphemy/unholily naughty(?). Let’s just say bad. Not good.

And Kirkpatrick, being a good chum, says “I’ll make sure” and goes in with one of Boab’s other pals. They stab the body a few times, just to check, which also gives the excuse of “if anyone asks, we don’t know who actually killed him. Don’t worry, Boab. We got you”.

Boab ends up excommunicated regardless, because hey, who knew shanking your cousin and the more rightful king than you in a Church is a tiny bit BAD. But as history shows, didn’t stop him being King. And when he became King, he didn’t forget the pals who backed him up. Kirkpatrick was his best man and got given a nice chunk of land, a title and the aforementioned crest.

This is it on the wall of a castle:

Scottish History. You couldn’t make it up.

From weeping warts to leprosy: the gruesome art of medical illustration

This tension, between the functionalism of medical illustration and the aesthetic properties of the images themselves, is as present for the modern viewer as it was for Hazlitt – with this added humanitarian twist: whereas from the 1700s well into the 19th century, the bodies of those so dissected and displayed were accorded no particular respect, our culture of sympathy cannot help but imbue even the most hacked-about and diseased of tissues with the lineaments of sensibility.

“The strange, symbiotic relationship between medicine and social oppression is here given full-colour form: not only by anatomical illustrations of paupers’ and criminals’ corpses, but also by what – were they not so disfigured – would be regarded as straightforward portraits of the leprous and the syphilitic, the tubercular and the cancerous.”

The gospel will receive you into its halls if you come as a sinner, not otherwise. Wait not for reformation, but come at once for salvation. God justifieth the ungodly, and that takes you up where you now are: it meets you in your worst estate.
Come in your disorder. I mean, come to your heavenly Father in all your sin and sinfulness. Come to Jesus just as you are, leprous, filthy, naked, neither fit to live nor fit to die. Come, you that are the very sweepings of creation; come, though you hardly dare to hope for anything but death. Come, though despair is brooding over you, pressing upon your bosom like a horrible nightmare. Come and ask the Lord to justify another ungodly one. Why should He not? Come for this great mercy of God is meant for such as you are. I put it in the language of the text, and I cannot put it more strongly: the Lord God Himself takes to Himself this gracious title, “ Him that justifieth the ungodly.” He makes just, and causes to be treated as just, those who by nature are ungodly. Is not that a wonderful wordfor you? Reader, do not delay till you have well considered this matter.

C. H. Spurgeon

Come in your disorder. I mean, come to your heavenly Father in all your sin and sinfulness. Come to Jesus just as you are — leprous, filthy, naked, neither fit to live or fit to die. Come, you who are the very sweepings of creation. Come, though you hardly dare to hope for anything but death. Come, though despair is brooding over you, pressing upon your bosom like a horrible nightmare. Come and ask the Lord to justify another ungodly one. Why should He not? Come, for this great mercy of God is meant for such as you are…..
— Charles Spurgeon