legion-condor

80th Anniversary of the bombing of Guernica (Gernika)

80 years have gone by since the Nazi German Condor Legion (an air force unit Hitler wanted to test out before WWII and guess who were its Guinea pigs?) and the Fascist Italian Aviazione Legionaria warplanes bombed the Basque town of Gernika, which represented the heart of Basque culture, on April 26, 1937 at the request of the Nationalist faction during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) in an manoeuvre known as Operation Rügen.

Ruins of Guernica after the bombing. Number of victims: between 150 and 1650 (estimates vary according to different reports).

This heinous attack aimed at civilians (mostly women and children since the men were away fighting at war) on a market day, inspired one of Pablo Picasso’s most famous paintings Guernica (1937). It took him 35 days of work and finished his masterpiece on June 4, 1937.

Guernica (1937)
Pablo Picasso
349cm x 776cm
Oil on canvas
Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid (Spain)

P.S. This is primarily not related to OP but if you want a slight connection to it, think about Nazi Germany being the main base for the Vinsmoke family and Jora’s art powers would connect to cubism.

A pic from our new Spanish Civil War Page

German-made Junkers Ju-87B Stuka dive bombers, part of the Condor Legion, in flight above Spain on May 30, 1939, during the Spanish Civil War.
The black-and-white “X” on the tail and wings is Saint Andrew’s Cross, the insignia of Franco’s Nationalist Air Force. The Condor Legion was composed of volunteers from the German Army and Air Force.

Last commander of the Condor Legion, Generalmajor Dr.Wolfram Freiherr von Richthofen (he received a diploma engineer, dated May 10, 1924 and engineering doctorates in 1929),

photographed by Hugo Jaeger in the event of acceptance of the Condor Legion in Berlin dated June 6, 1939.

He is one of only 28 people selected German soldier who was awarded Spanienkreuz Schwertern in Gold mit mit Brillanten (look at his left, just under the D Wing Pilot Spain), which he received on the above date (June 6, 1939). At his right pocket we could see the other two medals Spain: “Medalla Militar Individual” and “Medalla de la Campaña 1936-1939” which is given to all troops who joined Franco’s Nationalist party (including the Condor Legion) in the Spanish Civil War.

He still has a relationship with Manfred von Richthofen brothers, hero of the top air in the First World War

3

Rare gold damascened Spanish pocket pistol presented pilots of the Condor Legion by the Spanish Civil War Luftwaffe Association.  Comes with matching cigarette case.  During the Spanish Civil War the Germans supported the Nationalist Regime, using the war as an opportunity to test their weapons and gain combat experience for their soldiers and airmen.

Estimated Value: $7,500 - $15,000

Junkers Ju 87  ‘Sturzkampfflugzeug’ - Top favorite Luftwaffe planes [6/10]

The Junkers Ju 87, was designed by Hermann Pohlmann, the Stuka first flew in 1935 and made its combat debut in 1936 as part of the Luftwaffe’s Condor Legion during the Spanish Civil War.

The aircraft was easily recognisable by its inverted gull wings and fixed spatted undercarriage, upon the leading edges of its faired maingear legs were mounted the Jericho-Trompete (“Jericho Trumpet”) wailing sirens, becoming the propaganda symbol of German air power and the blitzkrieg victories of 1939–1942. The Stuka’s design included several innovative features, including automatic pull-up dive brakes under both wings to ensure that the aircraft recovered from its attack dive even if the pilot blacked out from the high acceleration.

Although sturdy, accurate, and very effective against ground targets, the Ju 87, like many other dive bombers of the war, was vulnerable to modern fighter aircraft. Its flaws became apparent during the Battle of Britain; poor manoeuvrability and a lack of both speed and defensive armament meant that the Stuka required heavy fighter escort to operate effectively.

The Stuka operated with further success after the Battle of Britain, and its potency as a precision ground-attack aircraft became valuable to German forces in the Balkans Campaign, the African and Mediterranean theaters and the early stages of the Eastern Front campaigns where Soviet fighter resistance was disorganised and in short supply.

Once the Luftwaffe had lost air superiority on all fronts, the Ju 87 once again became an easy target for enemy fighter aircraft. In spite of this, because there was no better replacement, the type continued to be produced until 1944. By the end of the conflict, the Stuka had been largely replaced by ground-attack versions of the Focke-Wulf Fw 190, but was still in use until the last days of the war. An estimated 6,500 Ju 87s of all versions were built between 1936 and August 1944.

Some notable airmen flew the Ju 87. Oberst Hans-Ulrich Rudel was the most successful Stuka ace and the most highly decorated German serviceman of the Second World War. The vast majority of German ground attack aces flew this aircraft at some point in their careers.