ledger lines

official musician compatibility

orchestra

1st violins: compatible with other first violins (to maintain the pure blood) and principle cello

2nd violins: compatible with violas because you’re both basically the same thing anyway. not compatible with other seconds because you’re just such awkward people 

violas: compatible only with other violas so you don’t infect the others with your viola cooties

cellos: compatible with pretty much anyone, but only if you’re first or second stand

basses: compatible with everyone at the same time because you’re generally attractive people just saying


band

flutes: compatible with clarinets and kazoos, and also first violins because you’re both the only people who can read ledger lines in treble clef really well

piccolos: only works with the oboe, because both of your instruments can really hurt to listen to

oboes: compatible with clarinets, but only if gay

clarinets: compatible with flutes, and with oboe because you share the bond of having people mistake your instrument for the other

bassoons: you’re kind of awkward people, but trumpet players (and traitorous second violins) find it endearing so there’s that

horns (french, english, and car): compatible with trumpet and trombone

trumpets: could actually be compatible with first violins if they weren’t so snooty

trombones: compatible with tuba just because the average person doesn’t know the difference between the two anyway

tuba (singular because what band would want multiple tubas): could be in a relationship with other under-appreciated instruments, like the bassoon, bass, kazoo, and viola

euphonium: lol did you think I would actually talk about this instrument

percussion: the sluts of the musical world. could get anyone they wanted to


choir

pretty much everyone in choir is gay, so just keep that in mind and go nuts


*other instruments like harp, piano, and guitar are forever alone

*mingling between band and orchestra, orchestra and choir, choir and band is a sin but sin is okay as long as no one knows about it

orchestra problem 312

getting brand new music at the beginning of rehearsal, to be played right away, 27 ledger lines above your comfortable sight reading range. is that an e flat? an a flat? an f?? nobody knows but God and the conductor

Music Theory Master Post

UPDATED: Sunday, June 21, 2015

Read up for tomorrow’s theory post!

Lesson #1: Staff, Clefs, Pitches on the Staff

Lesson #2: Notes, Basic Intervals, Basic Accidentals, Basic Scale Formation

Lesson #3: Scale Degree Names, Minor Scale Types

Lesson #4: Notes of Treble & Bass Clef

Lesson #5.1: Circle of Fifths

Lesson #5.2: Basic Rhythm

Lesson #6: Rhythm (continued)

Lesson #7: Time Signatures

Lesson #8: Odds & Ends 1 (Ledger Lines, the Keyboard, Double Flats & Sharps, Accidentals, Enharmonics)

Lesson #9: Odds & Ends 2 (Interval Inversions, Consonance & Dissonance, Dynamics, Tempos, Octave Notation)

Lesson #10: Chords, Triads

Lesson #11: Basic Part-Writing, Triad Inversions

Lesson #12: Beginning Roman Numeral Analysis

Lesson #13: Diatonic Seventh Chords, Seventh Chord Roman Numeral Analysis

Lesson #14: Phrases & Cadences

Lesson #15: Nonharmonic Tones, Other Cadences, Triads Outlined in Melody

As always, ask me if you have questions! It’s important to me that you understand the content. See ya tomorrow!

Instruments as piccolos see them
  • Piccolo: we get to ruin everyone's eardrums
  • Flute: Large piccolos with big egos
  • Clarinet: chill people who don't understand ledger lines
  • Saxophone: why
  • Oboe: allies against flute animosity
  • Bassoon: large oboes?
  • Trumpet: They think they can play as high as us HA no also pls don't try it hurts
  • Horn: beautiful. Absolutely beautiful.
  • Trombone: the French horns evil twin
  • Euphonium: ?? Large French horn? Small tuba? Will the world ever know??
  • Tuba: best duet partners
  • Percussion: why so much banging

rooks-and-blighters  asked:

Bruh, 10 minutes before my winter concert and one of my pads falls off for my bassoon. So I think, "okay whatever," until I realise that I can't play any ledger lines below the bass clef. Lo and behold I'm bassoon 2 so of course I have to play an octave up. It was like sight reading all over again because I'm a lazy shit and only remember the fingering, not the name of notes :')

.

anonymous asked:

Why do you dislike tenor clef? You're a bassoonist, so shouldn't it stand to reason that you'd like tenor clef?

DUDE IT’S BECAUSE I PLAY BASSOON THAT I DISLIKE TENOR CLEF

i’d rather read ledger lines on bass clef or treble clef than tenor clef, but that could just be because my first instrument is piano and i’m v comfortable with the treble and bass clefs

i also read alto clef, so whenever i see a clef that’s not treble or bass i kinda just automatically read it in alto and tenor is just kinda

hell

so yeah

Dot for Dot for Dot…..
✌️🔸🔶 Joker 🔶🔸✌️
🔹🔹 Heath Ledger 🔹🔹
No lines, only Dot for Dot to ready Portrait
Painted with Black and Red Fineliner ©ByTattooteddy ……………………………………………… ——— Star-Portrait Kunstdrucke/Kopien meiner Zeichnungen auf…………………………………………………………………….. .🔸🔶 Tattooteddy.etsy.com 🔶🔸……………………Versand Weltweit, .link dazu findet ihr in meiner Bio. ——————

TCMB Music Theory Master Post

Read up! I’m starting theory posts back up again tomorrow (hopefully on a regular basis).

Lesson #1: Staff, Clefs, Pitches on the Staff

Lesson #2: Notes, Basic Intervals, Basic Accidentals, Basic Scale Formation

Lesson #3: Scale Degree Names, Minor Scale Types

Lesson #4: Notes of Treble & Bass Clef

Lesson #5.1: Circle of Fifths

Lesson #5.2: Basic Rhythm

Lesson #6: Rhythm (continued)

Lesson #7: Time Signatures

Lesson #8: Odds & Ends 1 (Ledger Lines, the Keyboard, Double Flats & Sharps, Accidentals, Enharmonics) 

Lesson #9: Odds & Ends 2 (Interval Inversions, Consonance & Dissonance, Dynamics, Tempos, Octave Notation)

Lesson #10: Chords, Triads

Lesson #11: Basic Part-Writing, Triad Inversions

Lesson #12: Beginning Roman Numeral Analysis

As always, ask me if you have questions! It’s important to me that you understand the content. See ya tomorrow!

anonymous asked:

I need help - I've been playing clarinet for a few years and I still can't get anything higher than a D# (the one a couple ledger lines above the staff) out of my instrument. I don't know what the problem is - but I need to be able to get up to a high F in a month and I've began to panic. The D# comes out fine and the second I finger the E it dies on me. I'm playing on Vandoren V12 3's

It’s okay don’t panic I feel you. I think you might be tensing. Maybe you aren’t consciously tensing, but you might be thinking subconsciously about how THAT RANGE is approaching and your body’s involuntary response is to tense, biting down and backing off the air. Something that really helped me with altissimo is my warmup (playing it in the context of the Baermann scales book. the third one. it works wonders on tone besides, ya know, scales). What my teacher had me do is pick one scale a day and to start I stayed on that key for a week. I went in order and started with C major and Baermann takes it all the way up to altissimo F. I still do this as my warm up everyday where I’ll start at 60, met in eighth notes, and play each note as a quarter note all the way up and repeat until I feel the notes are even and matching in color and all that, then 70, then 80, I go to 100 then drop my met to 60 again and start playing the scale as written in 16th and move it up whenever I’m comfortable. This really helped with altissimo bc I was working my way up to it every time and especially when I started getting faster, I had no time to think about the fact altissimo was coming I just had to do it, which was really good in helping me keep my body relaxed while playing them. It also helps to imagine that you’re playing low, again so as to help keep you relaxed and keep your air support steady and constant. Sabine Meyer told Julian Bliss, “When you’re playing upstairs, imagine that you’re playing downstairs.” And I mean, the queen is never wrong. 😉 Hope this helps! ❤️
Ps: I would also have your teacher or someone check your clarinet for leaks. It might not even be your fault.

5

“Here it was about eight years after Clift had acted in it, and I Confess was on the screen; I was standing in the back of the theater watching. About halfway through, I saw Clift come up the aisle, slumped over, weaving a little.  At the back, he lit a cigarette and turned to look at the screen again.  I came up and said I worked there.  He was polite.  I said I liked the picture and asked if he did.

The huge image on the screen at that moment of his pre-accident beauty must have seemed to mock him.  He turned away and looked at me sadly.  “It’s … hard, you know.” He said it slowly, hesitantly, a little slurred.  “It’s very … hard,” he said.  I nodded.  He looked back at the screen.

A few steps away was a “request book” [Dan] Talbot had set up for his patrons.  It was a large lined ledger in which audiences were encouraged (by sign and trailer) to write down what movies they would like to see.  I told Clift about the book and said I wanted to show him something.  He followed me over, puffing his cigarette absently.  I leafed through the book quickly and found the page on which I had noticed a couple days before that someone had scrawled in large red letters: “ANYTHING WITH MONTGOMERY CLIFT!”

The actor stared down at the page for several moments.  ‘That’s very … nice,” he said, and continued to look down.  “That’s … very nice,” he said again, and I realized he was crying.  He put his arm around me unsteadily and thanked me for showing it to him.  Then he turned and walked back down the aisle to his seat.

When the picture was over, he and Mrs. [Walter] Huston came out of the theater.  I was standing outside.  He waved to me gently and they got back into the Rolls-Royce and it was driven away.  He made only two films more before he died five years later at the age of forty-six – a lost poet from Omaha, Nebraska, the most romantic and touching actor of his generation.”

Happy Birthday Montgomery Clift (Oct. 17 1920 - Jul. 22 1966)

Music Theory Master Post

UPDATED: Sunday, June 7, 2015

Read up for tomorrow’s theory post!

Lesson #1: Staff, Clefs, Pitches on the Staff

Lesson #2: Notes, Basic Intervals, Basic Accidentals, Basic Scale Formation

Lesson #3: Scale Degree Names, Minor Scale Types

Lesson #4: Notes of Treble & Bass Clef

Lesson #5.1: Circle of Fifths

Lesson #5.2: Basic Rhythm

Lesson #6: Rhythm (continued)

Lesson #7: Time Signatures

Lesson #8: Odds & Ends 1 (Ledger Lines, the Keyboard, Double Flats & Sharps, Accidentals, Enharmonics)

Lesson #9: Odds & Ends 2 (Interval Inversions, Consonance & Dissonance, Dynamics, Tempos, Octave Notation)

Lesson #10: Chords, Triads

Lesson #11: Basic Part-Writing, Triad Inversions

Lesson #12: Beginning Roman Numeral Analysis

Lesson #13: Diatonic Seventh Chords, Seventh Chord Roman Numeral Analysis

Lesson #14: Phrases & Cadences

As always, ask me if you have questions! It’s important to me that you understand the content. See ya tomorrow!