leaving this world behind

2

the sun is an arrogant thing, always leaving the world behind when it tires of us. the moon is a loyal companion. it never leaves. it’s always there, watching, steadfast, knowing us in our light and dark moments, changing forever just as we do. every day it’s a different version of itself. sometimes weak and wan, something strong and full of light. the moon understands what it means to be human. uncertain. alone. cratered by imperfections.

Non-Stop
  • Washington: They're asking me to lead, I'm doing the best I can, to get the people that I need, I'm asking you to be my right hand man-
  • Hamilton: Treasury or State?
  • Washington: I know it's a lot to ask-
  • Hamilton: Treasury or State?
  • Washington: To leave behind the world you know-
  • Hamilton: Sir-
  • Washington: how about you shut the fuck up and let me fucking finish you little shit

Now this is genius. Dot Inc. has invented a Braille smart watch that helps  visually impaired people check social media, view images, read texts, check the weather, read news and control smart homes.

“If you get a call, it vibrates, then you can check who is calling you.” -Eric Kim, CEO of Dot Inc.

“You can get on Google Maps and find the nearest Starbucks. Boom there it is.” -Arturo Espinosa, Braille teacher.

Dot Inc’s watch has 24 touch sensors and uses electro-dynamic cells to transmit information. The Bluetooth wathc uses an app to translate text and images into Braille. While the user reads through content, the display refreshes new letters.

The watch debuted in April for $290, and it already has over 100,000 pre-orders. There are 285 million visually impaired people around the globe. In an interconnected world, this watch isn’t leaving anyone behind.

follow @the-future-now

Ahmed also revealed some pieces of Bodhi Rook’s history that never made it onscreen. “Bodhi grew up on Jedha. It’s been a troubled planet for a long time. It’s occupied by Imperial forces, and I was thinking, ‘What makes you want to be a cargo pilot and just fly long distances for the Empire?’ I always imagined he was supporting maybe a single mother.”

In his mind, Bodhi was the only child from a poor family who agreed to work with the Empire because his mother was sick and had no one else to support her. “He’s taking a job, which a lot of people wouldn’t take. They’d think he was a collaborator with the evil forces,” Ahmed says. “He’s in a position of necessity rather than privilege, and I also think the desire to kind of fly and escape is a strong one. He’s someone who’s always kind of dreamed of escaping and leaving his home world behind, which also speaks to his ability to turn away from the political reality of Jedha.”

Then something happens that changes his mind and makes him turn against the Empire and try to help the Rebellion.

“In my mind, I think he would have lost his mother not too long ago, before we meet him, and that, in a weird way, makes him reassess,” Ahmed says. “It liberates him more. What he’s doing with his life, given that we’re only here for a short period of time?”

With his mother gone, there would be no one left in his life for the Empire to punish for his resistance.

Bodhi Rook went from the man who wasn’t there to the man with nothing to lose.

And if you leave your brother behind, it’s lame! 

 Cause it’s an effed up world, but it’s a two-player game!

@gayradwhitedad has pulled me into musical hell, and I couldn’t be happier

A witch puts a spell on a girl, a sleeping spell that promises the girl shall wake through true love’s kiss. Men come and kiss her. She slumbers. Women come and press their lips to hers, but still she sleeps. Many years past, and the girl remains still. One bright morning,  a lost little boy finds her resting spot and clears the dust and grime from her face. He offers her a kiss on her forehead, and her eyes flutter open. She never feels romantic love for a man nor a woman, and she cares for the boy until the day she dies.

A young woman is imprisoned in a castle by a monstrously formed prince. The servants of the castle hope for them to fall in love, and when the spell is broken they assume their prayers have been answered. They are all surprised, but nonetheless pleased, when it is revealed to them that the young woman and prince are the truest of friends, and nothing more.

They say the kingdom is ruled by an evil queen, a woman who is incapable of loving. She is unmarried, she has no consorts, and she wishes for no partner. She is the wretched queen, the heartless queen. She must hate her daughter, for her daughter is beautiful, and women are incapable of liking another woman who’s prettier than themselves. It must be for this reason that the princess was sent away, not for how she was attacked by a man in the woods. They say the kingdom is ruled by an evil queen because she cannot love. The queen loves her daughter, and that is enough for them both.

There lives a prince who is forced to choose a bride at the ball. He meets many beautiful women, but find none which he loves. He spies one in a gorgeous gown and wonder in her eyes, and he dances with her all night long. The kingdom is sure he has found his bride. When the clock strikes midnight he tells her how he will never love a woman, or a man, in the way he is expected to. The beautiful woman smiles and tells him she expects nothing from him. The next morning the prince and the beautiful woman are missing, having run off together to see the world. They leave their shoes behind in their haste.

Many kinds of love exist. It doesn’t all have to be romantic.

The 15 PLOT POINTS of Story Structure

To all the writers who have ever been told they need to outline their story, and privately thought “Great. But how do you DO that? What exactly does that mean?! Is there a map? WHAT IS THE SPECIFIC DEFINITION OF THE VAGUE WORD ‘OUTLINE’?”

Good news. Stories have structure. Structure that can be learned. And a fantastic place to start learning structure? 

Save the Cat: The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need by Blake Snyder. This book gives a simple outline that most stories follow. And as an introduction to story structure, it can’t be beat. 

In Save the Cat, 15 plot points are spelled out in something called a beat sheet. During the outlining process, these “beats” or plot points can be used as an armature or skeleton that your story is built upon. 

So what are those 15 plot points?

Opening Image: A snapshot of the hero’s problematic ordinary world, right before the story starts and changes everything. 

Set-Up: Further establishing that ordinary world and what the hero does every day, impressing upon the audience or reader what’s wrong, and the idea that something needs to change.

Theme Stated:  The truth that the hero will learn by experiencing the story, the statement that will be proven to the audience. But upon first encountering this truth, in this story beat right in the beginning, the hero doesn’t understand or outright refuses to believe it. The theme stated is asking a question, a question which the story will answer.

Catalyst: The ordinary world is shattered. Something unexpected happens, and this event triggers all the conflict and change of the whole story. Life will never be the same after this moment. This is the Call to Adventure. 

Debate: But for a moment, the hero won’t be quite sure about answering that call. Leaving behind the ordinary world is difficult – even if the catalyst has come along and disrupted everything – because the ordinary means safety, it means not being challenged, it means avoiding conflict and heartache. Yes, that existence they’re stuck in might be stagnant and unpleasant, but it protects them from facing the intimidating task of growth, of becoming something better.

Break Into 2: And this is when the hero decides to answer the call and cross the threshold of act two, determined to pursue their goal. 

B Story: This is when the relationship – which usually carries and proves the theme – starts in earnest.

Fun & Games: This is just what it says: the premise promised a certain type of pure entertainment, and this beat is where we get to experience it fully. 

Midpoint: This is either a false victory or a false defeat. Something really really good happens. Or something the exact opposite.

Bad Guys Close In: Forces of opposition and conflict begin to converge on the hero and his goal. Everything begins to fall apart for the hero, the defeats piling up one after another, the main character punching back.  

All Is Lost: This is the sequence where absolutely everything falls apart for the hero. The plans fail, the goal is lost, the mentor dies, the villain wins. All is, quite literally, lost. 

Dark Night of the Soul: The hero’s bleakest moment is right here. In addition to all of the tangible things that have been lost, hope and the gumption to continue with the story have also vanished. There is usually a hint of death here, of some kind. An actual death, or an emotional or spiritual death. 

Break into 3: Ah, but there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. Inspiration occurs, hope is rekindled, courage to pursue the story returns. Usually, this is the moment where the main character learns what they NEED, the truth which will heal them, and allow them to fix their own lives. With this, they are able to snatch victory from defeat.

Finale: And in here, the story goal is pursued once more, but this time from the stronger version of the hero – the version that has learned the theme, and committed to act accordingly. 

Closing Image: The opposite of the opening image. This is a snapshot of life after the story, the problems of the ordinary world solved or banished, a new world opening up for the hero. If the opening is the equivalent of “once upon a time” this is saying “And every day after … “ 

So let’s see how that works! And to see it, let’s look at my favorite short film of all time – Paperman  (because this gave me an excuse to watch it several times and listen to the music while writing it.)

1) Opening Image

We see George, a twenty-something in a sixty-something’s suit and tie, obviously on his way to work, and not looking at all enthused about it. He stares straight ahead, expression bored, lifeless, right on the edge of depressed. Wind from a passing train pushes him slightly, and he lets it, demeanor unchanging. 

2) Set-Up

But then a sheet of paper, caught on the wind, hits his shoulder. The paper flies off again, and a young woman appears onscreen, chasing after the paper, as the surprised George watches.

 After catching it offscreen, the girl returns, tucking the paper into the stack she carries, smiling slightly. They both face forward, waiting for the train side-by-side, in silence. She’s glancing sideways at him, he’s smiling and fidgeting nervously, but still resolutely facing forward; they’re both aware of each other, seemingly hoping the other will be braver, but neither able to overcome their shyness and the unspoken rules of everyday life. 

3) Theme Stated 

As a train charges into the station, a paper from George’s stack is snatched by the wind and lands flat on the woman’s face. When he pulls the paper away, she laughs: her lipstick left a perfect kiss mark on the sheet. When George spots it, he laughs too … 

but when he opens his eyes, she’s gone. She’s boarded a different train. The kiss-mark paper flaps in the wind as the train begins to move, taking her away. He watches, crestfallen. She glances back. Looks of regret and disappointment are exchanged, both a little wistful. The paper, the symbol of their fleeting memorable meeting, waves goodbye. 

Through this little sequence of images, the question of the whole story is asked: Was there a connection between them? Will they find each other again? And on a wider level: What does it take to find love? 

Further Set-Up:

And cut to George behind a desk, in a gray office, dark file cabinets towering behind him, clocks on the wall ticking away his life. Miserable again, he stares at the lipsticked paper. A stack of documents slams onto the desk from on high. The grim-faced boss of the office scowls down at him. George frowns at the stack, then at his boss, who stomps away.   

4) Catalyst 

Breeze pulls the kissed paper off his desk and out the open window. He catches it just in time, breathing a sigh of relief. And then he sees something. The girl! She’s there! She’s right across the street! 

5) Debate 

He needs to get her attention! He dithers for a moment, then throws the window wide and enthusiastically waves his arms.

 An ominous "ahem” from the boss brings him back inside, and back to his desk. But his attention is still on the girl, and the need to get her attention. He folds a paper airplane, stands before the window, poises the airplane to fly … but he glances at his boss’s office before he throws it. Should he? 

6) Break Into Act 2

Yes. Yes, he should. He sends the little airplane messenger to bridge the distance between himself and the girl. 

7) B Story

What he should have done while waiting for the train, he’s committed to do now. Talk to her. The relationship of the story has started officially. 

8) Fun & Games

In this moment, he becomes the “paper man” of the title. He folds and throws paper airplane after paper airplane. The boss shows up, shoves him back and slams his window. George pauses until he’s gone, then just keeps sending airplanes. They sail over the street, but are intercepted or miss their mark every time. 

9) Midpoint

He reaches for more paper … and knocks an empty tray off the desk. He’s run out. Except for one paper, the kissed one, the only one he’s held onto. With a determined look, he folds it precisely into an airplane, stands before the window, breathes to steady himself … 

And the wind steals the airplane from his hand, sending it spiraling to the street below, George reaching out pointlessly. On top of this defeat, the girl leaves the office.  

10) Bad Guys Close In 

Immediately, the boss emerges from his lair. The other office workers hurriedly return to their scribbling, hunched to avoid drawing attention. The girl is leaving the building across the street! George turns from the window … and finds the boss looming above him, glowering, delivering another tall pile of meaningless work. 

George sinks into his chair, defeated. But something happens as he watches his boss walk away, as he sees the office workers in neat rows; all of them older versions of George, reflections of what he will become … if he doesn’t do something right now. 

He runs, sending paper from the perfect stacks flying in his wake. 

11) All Is Lost

But when he escapes the building, and attempts to cross the street, cars nearly kill him. And when he finally makes it to the opposite sidewalk, the girl is nowhere in sight. She’s lost again. 

And all he manages to find is the little traitorous paper airplane. The paper he’d believed might mean something, might have signified something important and maybe a little magical. Which it obviously never did. 

12) Dark Night of the Soul

Angry, he grabs the plane and throws it with all his strength.  He’s lost his job, he’s lost the girl, he’s lost all faith in the magic he’d just started to believe might be real. He stomps towards the train station, returning home. 

13) Break Into 3  

But fate has other plans. The airplane glides over the city, almost supernaturally graceful and purposeful. It dives between buildings, and lands in the middle of the alley where all the paper planes have collected. 

It sits immobile. Then it moves. Moves again. And jumps into flight. The airplane flies over the rest, stirring them into motion, into the air. In a place where not even a breath of wind could reach, there is now a whirlwind of George’s airplanes. 

Though the forces of mediocrity tried to keep them apart, something greater has recognized George’s efforts and is going to see things through. 

14) Finale

A parade of airplanes follows George down the street. 

The leader attaches to his leg. He brushes it off, mad. A flurry of them attach to him, then carry him down the street, unfazed by his fighting. 

The leader airplane rockets over the city purposefully, finds the girl, then lures her to follow.

 She chases after. 

Somewhere else in the city, George is being pushed wherever the paper airplanes want him to go. We switch back and forth between George and the girl, as the airplanes push him and beckon her. 

Until they’re both on different trains, which stop simultaneously, on opposite sides of the platform. The girl gets out. She fiddles with the airplane, like she’s trying to get it to work again. And just then, a breeze brings hundreds of paper planes skittering all around the platform.

 She looks up …

15) Closing Image

And there’s George, covered in paper planes. 

He lurches towards Meg, and the airplanes falls away, their work done. 

George and Meg face each other, smiling, the barriers of routine and shyness overcome. Exactly what should have happened, exactly what was meant to happen. Putting effort into connection and love prevailed in the end, defeating the allure of life spent in safety and mediocrity. The closing image is the opposite of the opening: he’s not alone, he’s not facing the train leading to his mundane job, he’s not looking miserable and hopeless. He’s facing the girl, his bright and meaningful new future.

***

So! Those are the 15 plot points. This is a fantastic way to begin learning what story structure is, why it works the way it does, and how to precisely pull it off. 

For a more in-depth explanation, I highly recommend picking up a copy of Save the Cat. (It holds a special place in my heart; it was the first screenwriting book I ever read, and started obsessive study of storytelling.)

psychic: reads my mind

me: aPOCA lypse OFTHE DAMNed,,, LEVEL N I N E …….. THE CAFETORIUM
find the bad gUY, PUsh him aside, then mOVE ON FORWARD with your fRIEND AT YOUR SIDE,,, it’s a TWO PLAYER GAME, so when they make an atTACK, youknowyagottabrothergonnahaveyaback
then ya stay on track, and-AAAAAAAAH-remain on course,
annnnd if they give ya a  s m a c k  ya g-AAAAAHHH-ta use your force,
if you leave your brother behind it’s LAME
cuz it’s aN EFFED UP WORLD BUT IT’S A TWO-PLAYER GAME, hhHEY!

psychic: what the fuck

10

These are a few of my favourite things (◡‿◡✿): Sebastian Stan

You gotta stay hungry. It’s all over for you the moment you don’t. And in my job, it’s also about exploring yourself. Films are an incredible medium where you get to talk to people. I have these great fans, they write me everyday, telling me about their lives getting better from watching my movies. To me that’s more important than anything else. And as a man in the world, you have to leave something behind, if not what the hell am I doing while I’m here?

SVTFOE FANDOM: Marco spent 16 years chasing down Hekapoo to earn those scissors. As a 30 years old man, the safe kid was forced to leave his childhood behind, learning to survive in a cruel, different world. The trauma of coming back to Earth’s timeline, which immediately reverted him back to his 14 years old-self, definitely scarred him for life. It will take days, weeks, maybe months or years for him to adjust to his old life, slowly starting to remember his family, his friends, even though deep down he will always feel like an outcast, as the 30 years old man trapped forever in the body of a teenager he is.

MARCO:

cave me in (m)

based on the prompt, “fake relationship au“

pairing: shin hoseok | reader
genre: romance, angst, smut
word count: 16,184
description:  you’ve never regretted being shin hoseok’s best friend, but when you realize you’re in love with him when he’s supposed to be your fake boyfriend at his ex-girlfriend’s wedding you’re actually starting to.
author’s note: IT’S FINALLY DONE. this was supposed to be a drabble (as if)…. for @wonhopes thank you for requesting this and feeding into my love for wonho….. and thank you @wangpuppo for listening to me change my mind a million times about the plot for this.


Originally posted by lostinmonstax


You weren’t supposed to fall in love. (Not again, at least.)

All you were supposed to do was fake a smile, look good on his arm, and make everyone believe that you were in love.

Nowhere in your agreement did it say to enjoy the warmth of his arms, the smile that curves on his beautiful reddened lips, the sound of his deep, guttural voice whether it was when he was talking or singing or even whispering sweet nothings in your ear. It was all supposed to be a simple exchange where you finally got to see your best friend, not revisit feelings you shoved away when you were in high school. But maybe the heart wants what it wants. Maybe you just liked the thrill of doing things that you shouldn’t or the way he made you feel just from a mere hand on your hip or caress of his fingertips brushing back a wild strand of hair…

Everything about Shin Hoseok was positively the worst and best thing that could’ve happened to you, and it’s his damn proposition to blame, unless you want to get more technical then maybe it was the moment he entered your life.

Keep reading

Sana and her two worlds

So for a while I have noticed that this season has included a lot of shots with Sana and doors. She’s been behind them, walking through them, peeking behind everything beyond the door, and even standing in the doorway as she is greeted by others.

I tried to not think too much about it because it’s just showing Sana enter a room right? It doesn’t mean anything.

But then I started to think about what Sana’s theme is this season. She is torn between two worlds. Her faith, religion, family as one world and then her friends, Norwegian culture, and now Yousef, representing another.

She wants both but she is struggling to find the balance between these two worlds.

The door is a symbolic representation of a passageway from one world to another, particularly in regards to religion. 

So when it comes to Sana, every time we see her with a door, it is representing Sana transitioning into another world.

When she sees the girls in ep 1, she stands in the door, observing the world they represent before joining them

When we first see her home, we get a shot of Sana actually entering it. Introducing us to her other world. The one we haven’t seen before this season.

We get to see her enter a party, representing her walking into that world again.

And then, we see her enter a room in the party to pray, symbolising her switching into her other world again.

She is literally taking the passageway into each world. Trying to separate them but have them both at the same time.

and you can tell it is going to begin to become exhausting, trying to juggle being a part of both.

Without knowing it at the time, when Sana looks behind the door at Yousef in episode two, this was representing her observing another world she wants to be a part of, but without actually walking through the door and leaving her world behind - which is now the issue she is going to struggle with when it comes to Yousef and her faith.

To be with him, how much of her world does she need to sacrifice?

If she steps through the threshold, how much of her world begins to crumble?

she is truly torn, so she continues to stay in the doorway.

and now in this clip we saw Sana hiding behind the door as she peeks at her mother and her brother arguing, representing Sana feeling lost between her two worlds.

She is watching as this one begins to shake at just the mere droplet of the other world mixing in. And this is when the trouble truly begins.

Soon Sana will have to stop hiding behind her door…and either choose between the two worlds, or find a way to bring them together.

RIZ AHMED CREATED BACKSTORY FOR BODHI I AM CRYING

Ahmed also revealed some pieces of Bodhi Rook’s history that never made it onscreen. “Bodhi grew up on Jedha. It’s been a troubled planet for a long time. It’s occupied by Imperial forces, and I was thinking, ‘What makes you want to be a cargo pilot and just fly long distances for the Empire?’ I always imagined he was supporting maybe a single mother.”

In his mind, Bodhi was the only child from a poor family who agreed to work with the Empire because his mother was sick and had no one else to support her. “He’s taking a job, which a lot of people wouldn’t take. They’d think he was a collaborator with the evil forces,” Ahmed says. “He’s in a position of necessity rather than privilege, and I also think the desire to kind of fly and escape is a strong one. He’s someone who’s always kind of dreamed of escaping and leaving his home world behind, which also speaks to his ability to turn away from the political reality of Jedha.”

Then something happens that changes his mind and makes him turn against the Empire and try to help the Rebellion.

“In my mind, I think he would have lost his mother not too long ago, before we meet him, and that, in a weird way, makes him reassess,” Ahmed says. “It liberates him more. What he’s doing with his life, given that we’re only here for a short period of time?”

With his mother gone, there would be no one left in his life for the Empire to punish for his resistance.

Source

Prediction: this happens before Alec, Jace, etc. go inside to stop Valentine from activating the sword since he’s used Magnus’ spellbook to counterspell Magnus’ institute wards (and get inside the institute–which is now mostly empty since shadowhunters have been dispatched to stop Downworlder attacks). Alec emotionally pleads with Magnus to leave the city, just in case the sword is activated, and he doesn’t want him nearby for it. Cue desperate kiss. Cue Alec possibly saying I love you. Cue Alec running in to try and save the world with Jace, leaving an emotionally-distraught Magnus behind. Cue Alec maybe being the person who convinces Madzie to stop helping Valentine… possibly because he injures Alec.

Cue our hearts breaking. Cue our hearts souring.

And scene.