leaves a bigger impression

Yoongi; stolen words

✉in which you’re calling Yoongi out on his bullshit 
❝nope nope nope, no continuation, nope nope nope
►931 words | mini scenario, college!au
© (photo credit)

Being new at a college where you don’t know anyone, in a town you barely know about but suddenly got the confirmation that hey, yes, you can rent the dorm here, it’s a lot to take in, especially when you have to be far from home and oh well, you gotta do what you gotta do. First days suck—all the time and it’s regardless whether you’re from here or not—it’s a universal understanding.

So when you’re making your way down the halls, trying to find out which auditorium you should be heading towards, there seems to be a huge commotion just right outside the place you’re supposed to be in and… really? Why now, why here, carry this somewhere else, God damn it.

But no, you’re standing and circling around the group of people who seems to be in the middle of it and they’re having…a rap battle?

Great, another fucked up college.

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anonymous asked:

Hey, I have EDS as well, and I hurt yeah, but not the worse and i dunno how I'm supposed to say I'm hurting without people thinking im just lazy or faking it. Am I allowed to be counted in the community if Im not as bad?

1. Yes, you are allowed in the community. No matter what. EDS has a pretty wide range of severities, and yes everyone is included. It would be downright silly not to. We all share a lot of stuff, and of course we want everyone in it :) 

2. I’ve actually written about this before, but literally every single person I know personally with EDS has told me that they have a mild case, or that they feel guilty because they don’t have it as bad as most people, or that they don’t belong in the community. At this point I think I’m talking about 10 or so close friends who have told me this 1 on 1. Yet I don’t think their cases are mild, and they don’t seem to think mine is (even though I have the same fears myself). Here is an excerpt from that post: 

It’s like some weird competition where the prize is secretly feeling guilty and suspecting you don’t belong among the people who are in the best position to support you. What is going on here?

Obviously, the answer is complex. Internalized ableism probably plays a role. And I have a few other theories: people tend to talk about their problems in support groups, and often feel awkward disclosing the things they still do well. The most severe cases might leave a bigger impression on us, and are more likely to be featured in news stories, or have a facebook page about their illness. Maybe we are in better shape compared to older people with EDS. Maybe some of it is just the familiar challenges of our own lives just seem much less dramatic than the unknown challenges of someone else’s.

I’m not entirely sure how much of a role each of these elements play. What I do know is I want to talk about this. For obvious reasons, this doesn’t get discussed much outside of private conversations, but I want you to know this is a very common feeling. You belong in the community, you deserve support and your suffering is valid. And that is true regardless of how severe you think your symptoms are.

3. In terms of telling people you are hurting, I’ve found that direct & honest info has worked best for me. When I can, I try to share a little bit about what EDS is and how it effects me, because I’ve found that even a few sentences of context can go a long way towards helping someone understand my situation. One way to accomplish this is to talk about it on social media – basic awareness stuff, explain what it is/provide links, mention that you have it, maybe how it effects you, etc. I had great results doing this – even though it didn’t get a ton of feedback, I later found out basically everyone saw it, and that helped me start conversations with a lot more understanding. And while there are always going to be jerks, I’ve found that a much larger problem for me is actually getting too much sympathy/pity when I don’t want it. 

PS. It’s always helpful to have a prepared explanation for things like your illness and pain so that you have a good answer ready if it comes up (it can be hard to figure out how to explain such a complicated thing on the spot). Here are some of my go to’s

  • I have a genetic condition that causes me to be really easily injured, so I am always dealing with sprains & joint injuries
  • I have a genetic condition that makes my joints unstable & causes injuries, which can be pretty painful
  • At this point, I have arthritis in my neck from the instability, plus that causes all my muscles in the area to spasm up. Needless to say that whole combo is pretty painful!
More Women than Warriors 1/?
Pairing: Clarke/Lexa (Clexa) | Rating: Mature | Link: Ao3

‘Before you,’ he said, 'you can see more women than warriors. Cowardly, unarmed, they will give up the moment they see the weapons and bravery of their conquerors who have given them such a drubbing so many times before.’ (Tacitus, Annals XIV.36)

The first time Clarke sees her, she’s sitting on a throne, presiding over her dominion with a piercing stare and a crown of braids in her hair. Her warriors are spread at her feet, a multitude of them, all long-haired and wild and clad in identical brown regalia. There’s something of the sacred about her, like the crimson cloak draped across her shoulders and her divinity are one and the same.

Or at least it seems that way… British girls’ boarding school AU. Obviously.

Chapter 1: Thrones and Rebellions

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n/leo; stronger than weak

genre: smut; warnings: praise kink; nc-17
a/n: this was a long time request and coughsomeonecough pushed me to write this. slipped in some ninja shinee crossover hehehe no but I haven’t written smut in a while   –> ao3

if taekwoon had felt anxious that morning, the reward of hakyeon’s touch on his skin is enough to make him forget.

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anonymous asked:

HonoKotoUmi 21. A Promise

*whispers* I shouldn’t be awake right now because I open at my place of work tomorrow but I’m having final live feelings and the urge to write is there so-

Fair warning- This will give you feelings because I’m pretty much crying as I write this. 

Thank you µ's and thank you to the Seiyuu. You’re incredible woman and you gave us an incredible six years (even if I have only been around for only a year and a couple months.) I look forward to staying apart of the LL community and I will always, always love µ’s. They’ve had an impact on me I can’t even begin to form with words on my own, and so I hope this prompt will convey all my thoughts and feelings to you all too ;u;.

Thank you for everything. I’ll always be a fan from now until forever. µ’sic forever!

21- A Promise 

“And… There! Take a look, Honoka-chan!”

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So I know a lot of people with EDS personally, more than most of the people I know do. Not including the people I met at the conference, I’ve met 8 young adults with EDS in person, and talked to many many more online. Most of these conversations & meetings were private, just me and one other person. And there is this weird pattern that I’ve never been sure what to make of but I want to talk about here. Of those 8 people, at least 7 of them told me they have a mild case of EDS and that they don’t feel they belong in the community. Many expressed doubt at their diagnosis, or felt awkward interacting with other people with EDS. There is normally an element of guilt, and of loneliness. 

And full disclosure, I have thought the exact same things. Many, many times. Except now I have this weird knowledge about what other people are thinking. Including myself, out of the 9 of us, how could 8 of us have such a mild case we don’t belong in the community? (And it gets even worse when I consider people I’ve spoken to online). And furthermore, none of these people seem to think my case is mild. For example, I can still work out, and I am pretty fit. I feel that justifies a mild case. But I have a friend, whose joint symptoms seem far worse than mine, who thinks my case is worse because I can’t drive or work full time like she can. Another friend is always telling me she thinks I have it worse because I have frequent subluxations and she doesn’t. But I look at her and see much worse fatigue plus 2 neurosurgeries and feel like I’m the one who doesn’t belong. It’s like some weird competition where the prize is secretly feeling guilty and suspecting you don’t belong among the people who are in the best position to support you. What is going on here?

Obviously, the answer is complex. Internalized ableism probably plays a role. And I have a few other theories: people tend to talk about their problems in support groups, and often feel awkward disclosing the things they still do well. The most severe cases might leave a bigger impression on us, and are more likely to be featured in news stories, or have a facebook page about their illness. Maybe we are in better shape compared to older people with EDS. Maybe some of it is just the familiar challenges of our own lives just seem much less dramatic than the unknown challenges of someone else’s. 

I’m not entirely sure how much of a role each of these elements play. What I do know is I want to talk about this. For obvious reasons, this doesn’t get discussed much outside of private conversations, but I want you to know this is a very common feeling. You belong in the community, you deserve support and your suffering is valid. And that is true regardless of how severe you think your symptoms are. 

Above image: A police officer washing a protestor’s face

OCCUPY CENTRAL WITH PEACE AND LOVE

To all those protesting, a friendly reminder:

PLEASE DO NOT INITIATE VIOLENCE!

There have been some extreme protestors out there, and while I’m sure the majority of you are peaceful protestors, these few negative experiences are sure to leave a much bigger impression on the people we are trying to convince!

KEEP THIS A PEACEFUL PROTEST! PROTEST WITH PEACE AND LOVE! WE JUST WANT THE BEST FOR HONG KONG!

Not only that, but I’m very sure some police officers are having a hard time, too! Of course that doesn’t mean we should overlook the brutality because it’s awful, but I have a friend whose friend is a police officer and while he was just standing there he was attacked by a protestor! 

Violence does nothing to help our situation! All of the police have received orders from higher ups to control the crowd, so they can’t disobey! 

BE PERSISTENT BUT DON’T BE VIOLENT!

TRY NOT TO VERBALLY ATTACK THEM EITHER!

REMEMBER:

PEACE AND LOVE!

Peace out.

Eiji Aonuma talks about Link’s Master Cycle | Order Today!

“The other day, I gave you all a sneak peek of Epona, which is a weapon included in a DLC pack for Hyrule Warriors. Today, I would like to introduce another one of Link’s “rides” which will be included in the Mario Kart 8 The Legend of Zelda DLC Pack along with Link…the Master Cycle. As you can see in this picture, the Master Cycle is designed after a horse, so it’s literally a horse of steel. (The Hylian Shield even looks like the cowling too.) You can use many different types of bikes in Mario Kart 8, but this Master Cycle has a design that characters ride leaning forward, allowing you to make sharp turns on the course. Also, this bike is designed a little bigger compared to other bikes, so you’ll definitely leave an impression on the track when you race with it. The development team showed me how the Master Cycle races on the track, and I was overwhelmed by how great it looked. (It looked so cool that I also want it to appear in games I work on.) Along with the first Mario Kart 8 DLC Pack, The Legend of Zelda Pack planned for release in November, you can also advance purchase the second DLC Pack, the Animal Crossing Pack either separately or together with the first pack in a bundle. Please check out Nintendo eShop or the in-game shop if you’re interested in this content (a software update is required in order to access the DLC content). I hope you’ll look forward to seeing Link take a leap outside of the world of Hyrule and making his karting debut!” said Nintendo’s Eiji Aonuma