leave-the-other-characters-out-of-it

Fic Rec!

How to Get Away (9079 words) by dumbfound
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Life Is Strange (Video Game)
Rating: Teen And Up Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Maxine “Max” Caulfield/Kate Marsh, Maxine “Max” Caulfield & Kate Marsh
Characters: Kate Marsh, Maxine “Max” Caulfield
Additional Tags: Hurt/Comfort, Humor, Bad Sleep Schedules, Bad Puns, seriously a lot of bad puns, Sacrifice Chloe Ending
Summary:

You have been quite the rebel recently—staying up past nine, ignoring your mother’s texts, not finishing your homework and sneaking out of school past curfew. Sleeping with another girl—literally, not figuratively—is one you choose to leave out. It’s silly and elementary compared to what every other high school senior does on a daily basis.

But, God, does it feel good.

Something a lot of DC fans forget in regards to the DCEU is that comics aren’t accessible to some people. A lot of disabled people don’t have the ability to catch up on 60+ years of comic book history, not to mention that some people don’t have the financial means to.

A good comic book movie needs to be accessible to both fans and newcomers to the material. My parents, for example, know Batman and Superman but aren’t as familiar with some of the lesser known characters. While they didn’t think BvS was as bad as people made it out to be, I remember having to explain Jason Todd, Darkseid, and other more obscure facts to them throughout the movie. Just because a movie was made for the fans doesn’t mean that it can leave non-comic readers in the dust.

Writing a Relationship Your Readers Will Ship

Relationships, especially in beginner writer’s works, have a tendency to feel forced. Even in some popular and famous works of fiction, the relationship doesn’t feel natural. It seems like a boring afterthought which the writer added in at the last minute. Far too often, I find myself completely indifferent to a character’s romantic life. A good romance in a story will give the reader a bit of second-hand infatuation. They’ll root for the relationship, beg for it. If the romance is well written, you can make a reader smile and blush just by reading a few sentences. When done properly, it can even compensate for a weak and cliché plot.

But first, decide whether the romance is needed. If you’re adding a character to the plot simply for the sake of being a love interest, it’s probably not a needed romance. You can still add it, of course, but it will be much harder to keep your story focused on the central plot.


Step One
Make sure the characters have chemistry.

The characters should compliment each other’s personalities. If he’s loud, stubborn, and aggressively opinionated, a more tranquil and soft-spoken love interest would suit him well. Two headstrong people wouldn’t be likely to have a lasting relationship in real life, unless they (impossibly) agreed upon every subject. But, there should be some similarities. While opposites do attract, polar opposites will not and the whole relationship will feel forced. The characters should have something in common. It could be morals, a parallel backstory, the same motivations, whatever. As long as there’s a reason for them to be drawn to each other, there’s potential.

Step Two
Slow burn ships are fantastic.

Don’t make your characters fall in love right off the bat. There can be attraction, of course, but genuine feelings of true love don’t happen instantly. Your characters should become closer as people, feel at ease around each other, and truly know the other before they fall head-over-heels. The readers will crave the relationship far more, like dangling a treat right in front of a dog’s nose, but keep pulling it away. Teasing is a beautiful thing.

Find ways of showing (NOT TELLING) the characters are falling for each other. Have them stand up for one another, be protective. Have them break their own normal routine for the other. For example, a callous, guarded character could lower their walls for a moment if their love interest needs emotional support. These scenes can be awkward for the character changing their typical behavior and that discomfort can demonstrate how much they care for the other, altering their own selves for the other’s benefit.

Howeve, make sure that you combine these cute emotional moments with distance. Make the characters deny their true feelings or even distance themselves from their love interest upon discovering their feelings. The more the characters long for each other, the more the reader will long for them to be together. Build barriers between them for your characters to have to work to knock down. Keep them close, but maintain that distance until the moment is right.

Step Three
“_____” translates to “I love you”

The first example of I think of when I think of this is The Princess Bride, where the male protagonist tells his soulmate “as you wish” when he really means “I love you.”

This falls under the category of show, don’t tell. Hearing a character say “I love you” has become so boring. Unless it’s done in a surprising confession or unique way, it’s boring and stale.

Come up with a phrase that you can repeat in moments throughout the story until it has a meaning of love for the characters and both know exactly what the other means when it’s spoken.

Step Four
Taking a break can help create tension.

You know you loved someone if you leave them and feel awful. Apply this into the writing. Your characters can break up, then get back together in a joyous reunion.


Step Five
Not every couple has a happy ending.

Sometimes, things don’t always work out for different reasons. An ending that leaves readers craving more can be a good move.

There’s way too much pro-Mon El/pro-Karamel discussion taking place under the protective veil of ‘Word of God’/’Death of the Author’.

  • “He’s not human; stop holding him to human/earthly standards.”
  • “He was born into a slave-owning society; that’s not his fault.”
  • “When he said [x-y-z], he didn’t mean [x-y-z], he meant [a-b-ampersand]; stop taking things so literally.”

He didn’t do anything. He wasn’t born anywhere. He isn’t real.

He isn’t an actual person functioning under the circumstances of his upbringing, or reacting to outside stimuli based on the chemical impulses in his brain, because he doesn’t have one.

He’s a fictional character, whose actions, speech, history, and traits are written for him, by actual, living, breathing, thinking human beings, who sit down in a room and consciously decide who he’ll be, where he’ll come from, what he’ll say, and how he’ll react.

So when he does something on-screen, it’s reflective of the Supergirl writers who decided he would do it.

He is not real, but the people who control him sure-as-hell are.

So when we criticize the racism of replacing James - a successful black man with a good heart and a deep, continued respect for Kara - with Mon El - an irresponsible, entitled white prince, who owed slaves and has openly mocked, criticized, and degraded Kara (in public) on multiple occasions that span the entirety of the season - we’re criticizing the writers, who purposefully decided to make these things happen.

When we criticize Mon El’s abusive behaviors - the disrespect, the mean-spirited hyper-criticism, the lying, the possessiveness, the ignoring and defying Kara’s wishes, etc. -  we’re criticizing the writers, who purposefully decide to continue this behavior, episode after episode.

When we criticize the huge amount of screen-time dedicated to Mon El at the detriment of the other characters who play more relevant roles in the greater plot of the series, we’re criticizing the writers, who have purposefully decided to write him into more and more of the script in increasingly more irrelevant ways, while purposefully deciding to leave out the veteran characters to give him a spot (like James).

None of your arguments are actually relevant to the discussion that’s clearly going right over your head.

You’re angry that we’re attacking your ship and your character, so you jump on the defense like you think we’re grasping for unfounded arguments in a jealousy-driven ship-war, instead of acknowledging the problematic aspects of it and joining the conversation to rally the fandom against the writers who continue to disrespect and portray the character you love, and relationship you adore in a way that undermines the reasons you love it, and the potential you see in it.

The writers didn’t have to break Kara up with her black love-interest in order to be with a character who didn’t have to be a white slave-owner.

The writers wanted to break Kara up with her black love interest, and they wanted her new white love-interest to own slaves.

They weren’t obligated to make him this way.

Someone chose to give this white man the title of slave-owner, when only 151 years prior to that decision, white people literally owned enslaved black people. That means there are absolutely middle-aged people watching this show whose parents and/or grandparents either were slaves, or owned slaves.

This is not an irrelevant issue, and you cannot argue that the writers didn’t make a harmful, racist choice to include it.

They did that, they chose that, and they will continue to make this same kinds of choices regarding your favorite character if you don’t start getting angry at the writers who keep giving you a shit character to work with.


tl;dr - Mon El didn’t have to be a such terrible person; how are you not angry at the writers who continuously choose to degrade him as a character

ew.com
'Supergirl' Books Calista Flockhart Return
Cat Grant returns! Calista Flockhart is set to reprise her role as Kara’s former CatCo boss in season 2, EW has learned. Details on Cat Grant’s return are being kept tightly under wraps…

Cat Grant returns! Calista Flockhart is set to reprise her role as Kara’s former CatCo boss in season 2, EW has learned.

Details on Cat Grant’s return are being kept tightly under wraps, other than Flockhart will appear in the final two episodes of the season, slated for Monday, May 15 and the finale on Monday, May 22.

A series regular in season 1, Flockhart took on a recurring guest star role when production on the CW super series moved to Vancouver in season 2. The character exited in the second episode of the season, during which Cat declared it was time for her to move on — she had dominated the media world, but felt stagnant, so she took a leave of absence to conquer new challenges. She has not been seen since.

Back in February, executive producer Andrew Kreisberg seemed optimistic that Flockhart would be back by season’s end. “We’re working on it,” Kreisberg said. “We love Calista, Calista loves us, she loves the show. She has other commitments and family and whatnot, but we’re trying to work it out.”

I saw this on a Mass Effect group on Facebook today and I’m reposting it here not to be critical or negative, but to actually get people’s opinions on it. Do you think it’s possible for Bioware to do a better job with their characters faces using the technology they have or not? Is there anyone out there with any game design expertise that could weigh in on this maybe? I have zero personal experience with designing games or creating animation so I have no right to judge Bioware because I truly don’t know what their limitations are when they design characters. I definitely don’t think Bioware’s faces are bad but I know I’ve seen more realistic faces in other games. Thoughts? Feel free to reply to this post or reblog with comments or leave me thoughts in my ask!

so I was talking with @gitwrecked about the Space Dad mentality and how rare it is that Shiro gets to have fun like the other Paladins do. A lot of fic and art either assume Shiro’s the responsible character, or leave him out completely while all the Paladins are having fun - and that’s always bugged me, a bit. Shiro so rarely gets a chance to play those games, or make mistakes, or be smol, or be taken care of in any way. In fandom, Shiro’s almost always the Responsible One, whether that’s in charge of the team, assisting with the team’s personal affairs/relationship woes Via the giving of Dad Advice, etc. etc. Even the mentality that back at the Garrison Shiro must’ve been tight-laced, Perfect, and Always Responsible is just…it doesn’t make sense, to me. Considering everything he’s been through, can’t our Shiro be allowed some fun?

Shiro would’ve been a COMPLETE troublemaker back at the Garrison. Hardworking and dedicated, sure, but once he proved himself and climbed up the ranks, so to speak? Kid could get away with ANYTHING. Nobody can keep a straight face quite like Shiro. Nobody knows why there’s always one particular flight-bike returned with just a bit less fuel than the others, nope, no sir. No, nobody knows how the doors to the hangars were left unlocked and a trio of cows slipped in last night. Nope, definitely not. Shirogane? Nope, definitely not involved. What kind of person would think that of Innocent, Responsible Shiro?

Shiro gets away with a lot of stuff like this. Matt only eggs him on, the little troublemaker. The two of them would make SUCH a pair, wreaking havoc, always messing things up, and the worst part is Iverson can NEVER PROVE IT. If Matt has even half the hacking skills of Pidge? Nothing would be safe. The rosters? Weird how Shiro and Matt are always in the same classes. Any type of list? Funny that the mess hall’s serving chocolate cake for dinner for the fourth night in a row, how odd. The simulators? 

Dear lord, the simulators.

Fake missions. Weird Easter Eggs left behind in mission logs, so the freshmen are running these simulations and that’s definitely a duck that just flew past us, sir, how is a duck faster than this ship? Weird loopholes, one set of canyons that definitely loops you back to the beginning just after you exit. Missions with heavy-loss scenarios that light up at the end with a huge message saying APRIL FOOL’S. Just messing with everyone.

[Iverson: WHO LET HOLT INTO THE SIMULATOR PROGRAMMING?
Matt, deadpan, as the newbies running the simulation have to fly through a series of caves in a mountain that looks suspiciously like a nose (only access point is through the nostril): It’s my computer programming final, sir. 
Iverson, who didn’t check all the course syllabi: Shirogane, is this true?
Shiro, without batting an eye: Yes sir.]

In addition to the ability to lie their way out of every inquisition, Matt and Shiro are pretty clever at this. They don’t have to lie often because they don’t get caught. They’re extremely cautious, planning tricks weeks or months in advance, well worth taking the time to pull it off well and cover our tracks than it is to get caught and give up the whole game. (I’m not saying they were Weasleys of the Garrison, but.) 

I wonder if this is also one of the reasons Lance looks up to Shiro so much. Picture one night a very young and impressionable Lance sneaking out of his dorm after hours, trying to get a level up by gaining just one extra peek at the simulators (poor bab wants so badly to be fighter class), and in so doing caught the rarest of rare events: Shiro, sneaking out of the simulator programming room.

And Lance doesn’t mean to, but he stumbles right into a trashcan and makes a huge clatter and Shiro’s head whips up and the two of them just stare at each other. Lance’s heart is going a mile a minute, he’s going to get in trouble, that’s Takashi Shirogane, the straight-A Perfect Responsible Top Of His Class Pilot - 

Shiro draws breath. Lance winces, waiting for the reprimand.

“Can you keep a secret?” Shiro asks, and winks.

“Uh,” stutters Lance, floored.

And then the next day Lance is watching the simulator runs with his class, but for whatever reason the Simulator’s infected with some sort of weird bug. Anytime anyone fails at any part of the program the screen rains down confetti on them. Forgot to buckle your seatbelt? CONFETTI. Effed up that landing? CONFETTI. Turning to hurl into the main gearbox- 

“Shirogane,” Iverson growls, “Did you program this run?”

“Must be a glitch, sir,” Shiro says, completely straight-faced.

And Lance is a goner.

Touka and Kaneki a Step in the Right Direction

Touka and Kaneki are two characters in Tokyo Ghoul that in many ways have created a chemical reaction. Sometimes they are able to come together and make something useful but other times they cause an explosion. Touka and Kaneki are two characters who are similar but have reacted to their world differently. 

They are both lonely being raised by a single parent after the sudden death of the other, and the parent who raised them left permanent scars. Touka was raised by a hypocrite who told her that humans were to be cherished as he killed them behind her back. He would later leave home one night and never come home leaving Touka to develop abandonment issues, as she never felt good enough to keep her father around. She also kept her fathers lessons close to her heart and whenever she strayed she thought of herself as a monster.

Kaneki was raised by a mother who treated him kindly with conditions, as long as he was quiet and a good boy she treated him fine. But god forbid he acted like a normal child and didn’t think of his mothers issues he was abused. Then on top of that his mother died so suddenly that he felt abandoned and his foster family in his aunt made him a recluse which made him feel worse. Kaneki also carried around the twisted message of letting himself get hurt for the sake of others.

Touka and Kaneki grew from this so differently, Touka turned bitter towards that life before she was able to examine herself, and find peace with her lifestyle. Kaneki on the other hand internalized his frustrations acting like he was at piece with his life on the outside, but he was tearing himself apart on the inside. They developed opposite of each other, as Touka matured Kaneki fell apart. They worked so well together in the beginning because in the first part of tg they had similar development. Kaneki and Touka were trying to figure out what it meant to be a ghoul. Kaneki was trying to learn what his new life of a ghoul had for him, and Touka was learning that she could live a normal life away from the violent circle of hatred. Their paths meshed together so they grew together until a the same sunlight in a way.

However, as much as they grew together, they also grew closer together, the more their faults started to creep up on them both. Touka wanted to protect Kaneki because he was once human. But as Touka did that Kaneki became more concerned and decided to protect her at the cost of himself.

But in Kaneki’s need to protect her he hit her weakest emotional cord, abandonment. He told her he wasn’t going to go home with her, and told her she couldn’t help him and asked Tsukiyama and Banjou to go with him in front of her. All her childhood insecurities came back in that moment, she wasn’t good enough and it hurt her.

It was at this point that they developed separate from each other, where Touka became a normal high school girl and Kaneki became a serial killer and gang boss. They developed into two completely different paths and they didn’t know how to approach each other. When they met up again it showed through their conversation which inevitably resulted in Kaneki lying about being fine and Touka hitting him and telling him he hates how he changed. This exact moment triggered both of their childhood trauma’s. Touka with her issues of her not being good enough for her father and how he couldn’t confide in her. Causing her to lash out against everything he taught her, and Kaneki with his abuse and him doing exactly what she wanted from him.

However, because of the Anteiku raid they never got to reconcil, so thus three years go by and Kaneki is reborn as Haise. They developed apart and had a fresh start as Touka the waitress and Haise the investigator. This is so important because this is the time that without the burden of a past they fell for each other. This taught Touka a very important lesson, that she cares for Kaneki enough to let him go, but that she still cares for him and that not every change in him is bad. Kaneki learned that he has a permanent home in Touka one that she won’t take away based on conditions because even after she said she hated his change she gave him a place to return.

Then Kaneki changed again to a highly suicidal Kaneki, willing to die to be cool, to protect others. He hit his lowest low of the series and it was in that moment Touka said three words the struck him “See you later.” which he thought was cruel because he wanted to die. Touka knew but wanted him to understand the meaning of that and it caused him to hesitate to doubt, which lead to him making a change of heart during their fight with Arima. 

Kaneki and Touka are two characters that develop off of each other, they bring out the best and worst in each other. They both hit cords in each other, but they also can heal wounds that they never realized they had. This conversation between them in this chapter is an important example of that. Touka admits her man issue with Kaneki, which is the fact that he always leaves her. Something she never understood and something she keeps trying to fix to no avail. Then he tells her that it was to protect her, because he didn’t want to cause her trouble where she would end up dead.

 Then he asked her to come with him, which filled the void that she had for so long. Touka also helped fill one for Kaneki as well, which was his loneliness. I’m not saying that Touka is a cure for his problems but through her confession she showed him that she cared. Which shocked him like he couldn’t even believe, that someone cared for him.

I think that the most amazing thing that even if he doesn’t accept the feelings romantically its important for him to know. Kaneki isn’t in any shape or form mentally to be with someone, he’s someone living for the moment holding onto a fragile string to survive. But for someone who has craved being loved for so long, it’s something he needed to here, that someone accepts him with his faults and respects his decision for death even if they don’t agree and don’t want him to die.

This is so important because Touka and Kaneki have reached the moment where they realized the mistakes that they made that caused the other hurt. They were able to talk about it and reach a positive note for both of them, and I excited with how this will help them develop positively moving forward. 

also, rose wasn’t in the trailer at all, and they’ve been a) making a big deal about how she’s a big new role, and b) saying that her storyline and finn’s will be connected in the film.

which leads me to hope that the lack of rose- and the vagueness of finn’s appearance in the trailer- means that his/their storyline is integral to the plot and would give away too much.

everyone knows that rey was going to train with luke. it was safe for them to show us that. but finn’s storyline? it was left very much an open book at the end of tfa. they aren’t showing us much of him because to do so would be showing us too much before the film comes out. the same goes for kylo, poe, and leia. this trailer really didn’t give us much to work with besides some insight into luke and rey and their relationship with each other. and even that was vague.

so i’m cautiously optimistic about this trailer. it leaves a lot for us to think about and wonder, and doesn’t necessarily mean finn’s role in the story won’t be significant simply because he (like most of the characters in the trailer) didn’t get more than one short scene.

Rambling about Reigen

Okay, so i really like the popularity of the whole Reigen is asexual headcanon. 

For a lot of reasons. so I’m going to ramble for a bit. not just about that, but also about Reigen and friendship in general.

One thing being; he’s not the sort of character that usually gets seen or portrayed as asexual. He’s not innocent or childish or naive in any way. He’s a sly con man whose greatest weapon is his words and he isn’t above outright manipulation. but he’s also a character who places great importance on being a responsible adult, and damn well tells off adults who pick fights with children. 

But he’s also really lacking in personal connections, and throughout the series thus far has shown no interest in forming romantic relationships, never so much as acting flustered or infatuated around anyone even as a gag. 

but while he has shown no interest in romance he also seems to neglect most other relationships too, but seemingly unintentionally. his neglect of his friendships, unlike his lack of interest pursuing romance, is something that it’s often shown he regrets.

His only real interpersonal connection in the series is with Mob (and Dimple) for the longest time, and after they fall out and we find out more about Reigen’s life outside of his connection to Shigeo we also find out more about the people he knows:

The closest thing he has to friends are a bar full of easily manipulated and flakey people, who turn on him the moment the whole media scandal starts. 

But what makes this different to most ‘loner’ asexual stereotypes is the fact that Reigen is actually incredibly adept at understanding people and isn’t socially inept at all, in contrast to Mob (who in further contrast, is also really good at making friends despite his social ineptitude). 

His main downfall really is that he can be a bit too dismissive of the people he actually cares about at times, both intentionally and unintentionally. Which affects the few interpersonal connections he really does care about since he does take them for granted at times, first with mob in the separation arc, and later in a much more minor way with Serizawa, when Reigen waits until the last minute before asking to hang out with Serizawa for new years:

Serizawa is so important to me as a character, but in regards to Reigen he’s also Reigen’s first real adult friend/employee in the entire series. so while minor, this incident does inform us of quite a bit in contrast to the start of the seperation arc. For one, Reigen accepts the rejection much better than when Mob told him he was busy that time, and even though Serizawa is just as, if not more socially inept than Mob, Reigen doesn’t dismiss his claim of having other friends. So, character growth!

The fandom likes to joke about it a lot, but Reigen has become a beacon of “Dad” to all the kids in the series, as well as the adults who act like kids if i’m honest! (looking at Claw with that statement) And despite being a fraud he’s the one everyone comes to for help, adults and kids alike. 

He’s the person the former Claw members go to at the start of the second Claw arc in order to get help, same with Teru. He’s the one Mob calls to take him and his friends out alien hunting rather than asking his parents. And he’s the one who solves the problems of so many other people in the series using words or plain old common sense. He may not go about things in the most ethical way, but he always honestly tries to leave people in a better place than where they started, even if that involves manipulation.

All in all he’s a unique and complex character, and honestly I couldn’t support the ace Reigen headcanon more. 

Okay so was I watching Order of the Phoenix again last night and idk why but I started paying a lot of attention to Draco, especially on the scene on Umbridge’s office after Fred and George explode the fireworks

Here he is all happy like “hehe Harry’s getting screwed”, as usual,but THEN

Umbridge slaps Harry and he’s like WHAT THE FUCK-

And then he has this look on his face like “wow I was just in for some light bullying but what the hell is this you old frog” (while the other slytherins in the room don’t even flinch or give a fuck about anything really)

And then right after that, they are interrupted by Snape and Draco goes back to smiling like “oh…yeah…I’m supposed to be finding this super fun” 

Now, leaving all my drarry shipping aside, it’s just really freaking brilliant the way Tom Felton portrayed Draco, and I feel like he understands the character so deeply. He portrays all of these mixed, confused emotions Draco feels, and how his image in front of others is important for him, how despite looking confident and cool inside he’s just utterly scared. Even when the scene isn’t about him he’s giving all this out. I love Tom and this saga so much.

D&D: How to Use Character Arcs as a Dungeon Master

In my previous post on character arcs, I talked about how a player should determine how they want their character’s arc to begin and end. It was from a player’s perspective. But how does a DM write an adventure that will make that player’s arc happen?

First, get the information you need. Ask your players to each determine how their characters will begin the campaign and how they want them to change by the end of it. Then ask for copies of their character’s traits, flaws, ideals, and bonds. Note whether a player’s character is going to die tragically and if they are okay with that. With this information, you can give the players what I call a moral quandary, personalized for their own character’s arc. A moral quandary is giving the player two difficult options that the player must decide how their character would choose. The character should lean to one side of a moral quandary at the beginning of an adventure, but gradually start to lean the other way as their arc comes to completion. 

For instance, a cleric might be presented with a choice to kill an evildoer or merely capture them. If the cleric is heading down an arc where their ideal changes from “all life is precious” to “evil must be stopped at all costs” in their character arc is going to make very different choices in that situation depending on where they are on their arc.

Let’s figure out how we can use this info as a DM and where to put moral quandaries using a 9-point story structure. These are not an entire campaign, but you can use each point as a fixed point in the narrative; a story outline based on the characters’ arcs. Plenty of different stuff can happen between each point, but the points must happen to create a robust story.

Call to Action

The player is given an initial call to action. Essentially, a moral quandary disguised as a quest hook. Try to have a separate but related call to action for each player. Ideally, the players should refuse the call to action, as they haven’t been “changed” yet. If they play to their characters’ initial backgrounds and traits, they will refuse the call. You can even enforce this by loading your call with descriptions of how the character is feeling. “You are offended that someone would even offer something so morally reprehensible to you, despite the fact that you could use the money.”

A good-hearted rogue is starting a tragic fall arc and is offered a chance to make millions from some morally questionable actions involving an evil regime, but decides it is wrong. An innocent paladin starting a coming of age arc could be offered a chance to rise against an evil regime, but values their own safety. A studious apprentice wizard starting a corruption arc is offered power in exchange for service to an evil regime, but decides they can get power on their own.

Inciting Incident

Something happens to force the player to action, whether they are ready or not. Try to come up with an inciting incident that involves all of the players, not just one. The inciting incident can act as where the adventuring party finally meets.

The evil regime in the Call to Action ends up invading the players’ quiet suburb to enforce martial law. The players escape or fight back or else they and their loved ones die or are enslaved. The rogue decides to run from their debts by joining the party. The paladin has seen firsthand what the regime can do, and will now join the party to find someone else who can help them stop it. The wizard seeks out more power to stop the regime.

1st Plot Point

The players learn the first shreds of information about the overarching narrative of the campaign. After the inciting incident, some characters might not be convinced and want to turn back. This gives them a reason to continue onward together, as a team. There should be no turning back from the 1st plot point.

Players learn how this evil regime has been spreading across the kingdom. It still holds many mysteries, but its power is great and threatening. Its power is centered in a capital city, which the players now opt to travel to in order to find the things they currently desire.

1st Pinch Point

A pinch point is the first real display of power from the antagonist or opposing force. In D&D this should be actual combat, though it doesn’t have to be. As long as the players see firsthand what the antagonist can do to their characters, this part will add the tension/drama that it should. If you want to have a 1st Pinch Point for each character, then this display of force should directly target the player’s character arc and spark the desire to change through a moral quandary. It’s an awakening. Create tension by ending a session with this pinch point.

The players come across a thieves’ guild run by the evil regime. The rogue takes note of how rich, glamorous, and lawless the life of a criminal is to spark their tragic fall arc. The paladin realizes how deep the corruption of the world runs and sparks their coming of age arc as their innocence starts to fade. The wizard realizes how much resources the evil regime has, and wonders what sorts of power they had in mind for him sparking their corruption arc.

Midpoint

More info is revealed about the antagonist and the perception of the characters change. They have an epiphany and decide to continue onward through their arc. This can, and most likely will, happen at different times for each character and their varying arcs.

The players learn about the leader of the regime. They have been pushed to the breaking point by the regime’s forces. The rogue decides join the regime and start doing crime for the regime and acting as a double agent against the party. The paladin no longer cares about finding someone else to help them stop the regime, vowing to end it themselves. The wizard gets an unholy tome and decides to learn how to make a pact with the demon the regime mentioned to overpower the regime. They are all still heading to the capital, though now with severely divergent goals.

2nd Pinch Point

The antagonist reveals their full power and threatens the completion of the characters’ arcs. The entire party should, in general, be at their lowest moment and completely without hope. This should happen at the same time for everyone. Ideally, end a session with this pinch point to create a cliffhanger and highlight the hopelessness.

The players reach the capital of the evil regime. The rogue is faced with a moral test, where they will be offered riches and allowed to live if they rat out their adventuring party. They choose to take the offer and are betrayed by the regime’s leader and sentenced to death anyway. The paladin comes face to face with the regime’s leader after being ratted out by the rogue. They fail the encounter and barely manage to escape with their life. The wizard is also defeated and their unholy tome is destroyed in the battle. The rogue is imprisoned and the paladin and rogue escape the leader and are being hunted in the capital.

2nd Plot Point

The last piece of the puzzle has come together in the second plot point. The characters finish their arc and learn how to overcome the antagonist. This can happen at different points and doesn’t have to happen quickly. For a tragic character, this is the part where they finally meet their end. Tragic characters fail to change or their change is self-destructive and they fail to overcome the antagonist of the story (tragic, isn’t it?). Think of this part as a moral quandary that characters’ finally “know the answer” to, as far as their character arc is concerned.

The rogue tries to escape, succeeds, but heads back to the thieves’ guild instead of his adventuring allies, and they ultimately betray and kill him. The paladin’s innocence is shattered and they gather rebel forces over time to take on the regime’s leader, becoming a leader themselves. They also find an unlikely ally in the wizard, who has finally succumbed to evil. The wizard still doesn’t know how to summon the demon, but they have already gotten a taste of evil’s power by performing vile rituals on captured regime members and will now use their power for vengeance against the regime’s leader.

Climax

The characters finally face off with the antagonist. The promise set out at the beginning of the campaign is fulfilled. The characters, having completed their arcs, are now changed enough to be able to defeat the antagonist. This should be the players at their most powerful and should be the most epic battle to take place in the campaign.

The paladin’s rebel army and the wizard’s evil magic face off against the evil regime’s leader. The battle is long and epic, but the characters succeed, freeing the kingdom of the evil regime.

Resolution

The game shouldn’t abruptly end after the antagonist is defeated! There needs to be closure. The players’ characters find out the results and the aftermath of defeating the antagonist, for better or for worse. In the case of an ongoing game, you should now set up the next campaign here.

The paladin and wizard regard each other as unsteady allies who no longer have a common enemy. The wizard seeks more power, even seeking to possibly usurp the void of power left from the regime’s defeat. The paladin and their rebel army gather in defiance of the wizard. The paladin tells the wizard to leave the kingdom and not threaten anyone with their evil, else the paladin will smite them down. The wizard, not having many spells left after the battle and not being ready to face an entire army, teleports away to parts unknown with a puff of green smoke. The paladin is placed in power, and the wizard now acts as a looming threat. Perhaps an NPC and villain for the next campaign?


This character arc outline is not cut-and-dry. You should use it as a guide, not a rule. Some characters might abruptly choose to change. Some will reach different parts of the outline at different times or out of order. Some characters might waffle between two sides of their arc before deciding which side they want to be on. But the more you talk to your players about it, the easier it is to come up with a generalized plan for your campaign’s story. Heck, your story might even change from what you initially intended by the end of it (a character with a bad roll can still end up dying before even finishing their arc!) But hopefully this will aid you in making the players love their characters even more and have fun as they grow and change in your campaign’s world. That’s what it’s all about, after all.

I like to say that season 2 is only bad because of the move to the CW but then I remember that in season 1 Cat was supposed to be the stereotypical mean boss until Calista said she’d only be in the show if  they made Cat the way she turned out to be in season 1. 

Aka Calista literally made Cat the amazing character she is and who knows what other strings she was pulling on that show. Then she leaves and tadah… Look at that mess.

Something I really appreciate about the new BATB film is that the costumes managed to (1) pay perfect homage to the original color tones and styles as seen in the animation and yet (2) carry symbolic changes and account for characters’ personalities, while also (3) being period appropriate. Like, wow. Major kudos to the costume designer and associated staff on this one.  

For example, let’s just talk about Beast/Prince wardrobe, which I find really interesting and beautiful. BATB begins with a dance, and the Prince is in this very dark, regal yet kind of gaudy clothing, standing out from the sea of women in white. (He’s also wearing a makeup mask, which is just another awesome layer of symbolism and era-appropriateness that I will not go into right now.) 

Throughout the film, Beast’s clothes get progressively lighter: from dark, torn rags (like he’s a criminal, a prisoner in his own palace) to the iconic lighter blue suit at the dance…to the moment Belle declares her love and they’re both dressed in all white (in this case, a symbol of purity and absolution)…to the very end, where the Prince wears blue again, but this time it’s the lightest shade of blue we see him wear. This change also reminds me of the trailer, where the word “Beast” in the title grows lighter as it gets closer to the word “Belle”. Beast’s subtle clothing changes represent the changes in his disposition and character. His wardrobe follows the path of the curse, from its inception to completion, as the castle goes from dark to light, from winter to spring, from death to life. 

The two other dance scenes are also important. 

When Belle and Beast dance together for the first time, Belle is the one who stands out in that stunning yellow dress. When Beast lets her go, her yellow dress positively pops in an otherwise monochrome, snow-covered forest, like a beacon in the night. And as he watches her go, he returns to rags, representing his hope leaving him behind.

In contrast, when Belle and the Prince dance together at the end, they both stand apart from the crowd but for different reasons than before. Unlike their first dance, this time the Prince is the one who shines the most in an otherwise temperate crowd, which parallels the opening dance scene. Unmasked, the Prince is in a light blue and white suit, the opposite of how he dressed before; and yet, this ending suit almost matches how Belle was dressed at the beginning of the movie, in her classic blue and white dress. Meanwhile, although at first glance Belle’s mostly white dress at the end might make her appear like just another girl in the crowd, she really stands out due to the roses on her dress, like a physical manifestation of spring coming back to the castle and the curse being lifted. 

Don't worry, I've already rolled another character

Here’s the situation : In this game, our Paladin was basically given a character to play. The player isn’t much for pre-made characters and has a tendency to make more flashy and roleplay-centric characters and the Paladin (which he said ‘Sure I’ll take it’) has the personality of paste. Former soldier, not very bright, likes to hit things really hard, but otherwise is a very bland character due to the way he was designed. The player has been trying desperately to get him killed but keeps rolling extremely well in fights and damage, and the DM knows it. Now, at level 8, he’s staring up at an Adult Red Dragon who is demanding tribute.

DM : (as dragon) You enter my domain, expect passage, and yet you bring nothing of value to lay at my feet as tribute? Your insolence will cost you your lives!

Paladin : I have something. I’ve brought it far from the seas of Peralon, where we sailed in search of riches. Riches we found. Food, wine, gold, items of magical nature. Valuables even I have never seen before, and I’ve marched on many lands and fought on the soils of many kingdoms.

Dragon : And what is this tribute? This rarity you speak of? Is it gold? Is it weaponry? Magic stones? Show me.

Paladin : It’s far more rare than any of those. You can find gold and weaponry and magical stones in abundance. But to find one of these…. It is a purely one of a kind thing. (OOC) And I drop trow, squat, and leave a dump on the ground.

The resulting fight saw the Paladin crit the dragon 5 times, with good damage rolls and lots of divine smites. The dm couldn’t seem to roll well for the dragon and missed a lot of attacks, but eventually hit him with the fire breath and barbecued him. One other party member had joined him but the rest held back out of fear. To be fair this beast was way out of our league. Both characters died. The other players offered the paladin’s armor and sword and boots as tribute. The dragon accepted and let them through. The DM then informed us that the dragon only had 27 hit points left.

His new character is a charlatan Illusionist wizard who runs cons and has managed to get the city watch on our asses in three cities. But it’s been amazing to see him work in the RP. Dude should have been an actor.

Why I can’t and won’t finish watching Iron Fist

Before anyone tries to jump down my throat about being a stupid SJW who only cares about the race angle, I would first like to point out that I enjoyed the hell out of Daredevil, another Marvel Netflix show starring a white man practicing Asian martial arts. It’s all in the execution, guys. And the execution here is garbage.

Let’s start with the martial arts. For the love of fuck, if you just HAVE to get a generic white man to play the lead, the least you could do was get one who was good at traditional martial arts. There are a lot of them. Charlie Cox, one Netflix recommendation over, pulls off some of the best fight scenes I have ever seen in a TV show (also, the man can act, so that helps too). Last month, I watched a red-belt student of mine in a local production of Macbeth. At twelve, that kid has more talent (in the acting and martial arts departments) than this Finn Jones tool.

Jessica Henwick’s form is nothing to write home about but at least she’s better than Jones. And both our action heroes would benefit greatly from some less shitty fight choreography and editing. (Guys, just adding loud ‘swoosh’ sound effects isn’t going to trick me into thinking the sword is swinging faster. I can see it).

To add insult to injury, the show condescendingly tries to make me believe that this pasty-ass piece of mediocrity is a better martial artist than Colleen Wing?? Just has him casually trounce her in her own dojo. With those wibbly-wobbly stances, son? I don’t think so. This is not real life, nor is it good fiction. This is some flabby-ass white guy’s jerk-off fantasy of being super awesome and showing up the hot Asian chick without any understanding martial arts whatsoever.

The acting in this show ranges from serviceable to painfully inept (lookin’ at you Meachum Jr. or whatever the fuck your name is, I’ll have forgotten your whole existence by tomorrow for all the impression you leave). Even the competent performances in this show only serve to remind me of more interesting characters from Netflix’s other Marvel shows. For example, Jessica Stroup’s acting is similar to Deborah Ann Woll’s performance as Karen Page, only serving to remind me that Karen Page alone is a more interesting character with more compelling scenes than half the cast of Iron Fist put together.

I will say that Colleen Wing is quite appealing and I applaud Henwick for making her both tough and charming, not an easy line to walk. If I wanted to be mean, I could point out that she is essentially just a Claire Temple 2.0 in terms of her temperament and her role as shelter and support to the Main White Guy at the point of her introduction. But I don’t actually want to pick on Colleen. She’s cute and I like her.

Now, back to being mean: STOP trying to make white characters look cool by having them speak Chinese (or any language they can’t speak for that matter, though I feel Mandarin generally gets a special kind of mangling for the crime of being a tonal language). It doesn’t sound cool. I hate to have to be the one to tell you this, guys. It makes you sound like a fucking idiot. Okay, sure, maybe you succeeded in making your white English-speaking audience think, ‘yeah, that’s really cool, he must be super smart and badass, I want to be like that.’ But White people, I am telling you this for your own good: you don’t want to be like that. Because as cool as that butchered-ass Mandarin may sound to you, it’s like a band-saw to my eardrums. It brings everything to a cringing, teeth-grinding halt in the middle of what might otherwise be a perfectly good scene. Remember when Wilson Fisk had a conversation with Madame Gao in ‘Mandarin’? That was the worst part of Netflix’s Daredevil. Worse, it made me embarrassed for an actor I greatly admire. So, to whoever decided it was a great idea to have Wilson Fisk show off his Mandarin, thanks dickhead. You wrecked an entire scene for my favorite Marvel villain.

Oh yeah, and if any of you want to try to tell me I don’t know what I’m talking about, fucking come at me bro. I have a black belt and 10+ years of training in traditional martial arts. I am a Chinese-American woman, proficient in Japanese and Mandarin, and I double majored in East Asian History and Buddhist studies.

Oh, did I mention that our protagonist keeps condescendingly spouting mystical pseudo-Buddhist bullshit to everyone he meets? And then throws temper tantrums when they (shock!) don’t take him seriously? God, I hate this show.

If I want to see better acting, I can go see a middle school play. If I want to see better fighting, I can go to the dojo and watch my seven-year-old green belts spar. If I want to hear Buddhist philosophy mangled by self-impressed white people, I can go to the yoga studio next door. 

6

=The Women and Girls of Sonic=
—–

Before anyone asks where characters like, Sally, are; I wanted to focus purely on the main game canon, and the Storybook games, for this photoset. The only exception I made was for Sticks, because she has a profile on Sonic Channel, and at the very least she did appear as a playable character in the latest Sonic & Mario Olympics game. So I didn’t leave Sally, and any other female Sonic characters from the franchise out of this, due to any dislike or personal bias.

Edit: I forgot about Lah from the short, “Night of the Werehog”.(Which is canon to games as far as I’m concerned.) Here we go.

Monster tropes!
  • A deadly monster with a terrifying appearance bonds with a small child and protects the small child with its life.
  • An injured hero comes upon a monster, or a hero comes upon an injured monster, and they have a Moment where they understand each other.
  • Giant vicious-looking monsters that answer to names you would give a pet dog.
  • A character rescues or spares the life of a wounded or infant monster; later, the fully-grown/recovered creature returns the favor.
  • A monster is only behaving aggressively to defend its young; the heroes realize this and make piece with the creature before leaving it be.
  • Similarly, a monster is only behaving aggressively because it is displaced and frightened; the heroes realize this, and help it to return home.
  • The horrifying eldritch creature that has been stalking the heroes turns out to be wholly benevolent, and its previously menacing behavior is revealed to be its attempts to protect them from something far deadlier.

BENEVOLENT MONSTERS!!!! BENIGN MONSTERS!!!! MONSTERS YOU DON’T HAVE TO FIGHT!!!

smh we’re back to the good old days of s3 again, aren’t we?

people have started to already dehumanize even and make him a villain and become islamophobic and racist because clearly he has a past that involves muslim poc boys from the balloon squad, coupled with the fact that their biphobia is so transparent because even is bi/pan, that their insecure lil ass feels the need to label him as a serial cheater because they think even will cheat on isak causing evak to breakup, and the fetishizers can’t have that happen now, can they? otherwise what else will they wank and jerk off to and fantasize about?

i wanna know why some people feel the need to think in such a narrow minded way that “isak must be protected at all costs from all harm” and wrap him in cotton wool, but “it doesn’t matter if any other character gets hurts idgaf about them”. my buddy, then why are you even watching skam in the first place?

newsflash: skam isn’t all about isak. skam is an ensemble cast show. y'all treat even with such disrespect and disregard him, and have become downright ableist in doing so too, by not giving a single fuck that he has bipolar disorder.

it pisses me off when i read stupid shit like “as long as my isak doesn’t get hurt by even or the balloon squad!”, “as long as even doesn’t get hurt by sana and the balloon squad (notice how they LEAVE OUT isak here … so isak can get hurt by even, but even can’t get hurt by isak? mhmm sure jan!)”, “i will riot if evak break up they need to be together 5eva!!!”.

because? i hate to break it to you son, but, they are gonna get hurt. a lot of people in this are gonna get hurt. it’s disgusting how dimissive people are to anyone else getting hurt though, as long as their white gay ship is all smiles and happy go lucky. y'all can’t stand the other characters, especially when those characters are poc muslims connected to even with a backstory to tell about him and his past (which, around dec 2016/jan 2017 all y'all were THIRSTING over), and how those poc muslim boys, especially mikael and yousef, were hurt and upset just like how even was, by whatever went down.

as long as y'alls agenda of seeing evak pda-ing, seeing them be horny teens, seeing them make out against windowsills, seeing them kissing here and kissing there, is met, y'all are fine. lol, as soon as that agenda isn’t met, and we finally get to see them as individual characters, which they are first and foremost, with a rich history and connections with other people, hmmm, suddenly y'all are feeling “a little bit 👀 uncomfortable 👀”?

lol. this season has bought out all the ugliness these people harbour. you know what y'all are? let me tell you what y'all are:

islamophobic.
racist.
ableist.
biphobic.
fetishizers.

and all y'all can literally gtfo of this fandom tbh. we don’t need y'alls “thirst” and ugliness lurking, anyway.

The first night his boyfriend didn’t come back to the dorm, Other Red (Red had already been the name of a student when Other Red was a freshman, and changing your nickname too much wasn’t the best idea) didn’t think much of it. It wasn’t unheard of for one or the other of them to spend a night with friends. But when he wasn’t there the next morning, or in their one shared class that day, Other Red started to worry. As spacey as Frankie Lee could be, he was an avid student. Frankie Lee wasn’t his real name, of course. It wasn’t a surprise to those who knew him that his taken name was musically inspired. He wasn’t answering his phone, either. When there was still no sign of him on the third day, Other Red started asking around. He found what he needed to know pretty soon.

“Yeah, the last time I saw him was a couple days ago.”

“Where was he?”

“Over by the track, by that little wooded area. He had his guitar.”

“He was going towards the trees? Sounds like he was looking for a quiet place to write songs.”

“Wouldn’t surprise me.”

“So he went, alone, into the forest, to play music?”

“Looks like.”

“Shit.”

***

Other Red didn’t waste much time. He packed what he needed, knocked on his RA’s door so someone would know where he was going (and so they’d be better prepared to notice if it wasn’t him that came back), and headed for the woods. All this wasn’t strictly necessary, since the RAs would go retrieve Frankie Lee at the end of the semester, but he might be… different by then, and Other Red didn’t want to wait that long to see him again anyway. He walked right into the shade of the trees, and kept going until he couldn’t see the edge of the woods behind him, though the forest he’d walked into was maybe forty feet across. Nowhere on the Elsewhere University campus was a surefire route to danger, if you knew what you were doing, just as nowhere was 100 percent safe if you were reckless enough, but going under the trees to play music? Other Red had to admit that had been stupid. He loved Frankie Lee, but he could be lacking in common sense.

***

As he went, Other Red reminded himself of a story. There was a smith, so the story goes, who made a deal. Who or what he made the deal with changes from telling to telling, but a popular version calls it the Devil. Other Red didn’t know about devils, but any Elsewhere U student knew there were other things you could make deals with. The smith gave up his soul in exchange for supernatural skill at metal work - the ability to weld anything to anything. When the Devil came to collect, though, the smith welded him to a tree and left him there. It’s an old story, one of the oldest, in fact. It’s been told for six thousand years. The story told Other Red a couple of things. One, that metalwork has always been a little bit Else, and two, that it was one way, maybe the first way we ever found, to get a bit of power over the Gentry. At least enough power to get him out of this.

He hoped it was enough to get him out of this.

***

After a while, he could hear music softly through the trees. He walked closer until he could make out the words:


Then the loud sound did seem to fa-a-ade
Came back like a slow voice on a wave of pha-a-ase
That weren’t no D.J. that was hazy cosmic jive
There’s a starman waiting in the sky
He’d like to come and meet us
But he thinks he’d blow our minds…

Other Red could practically see Frankie Lee, eyes closed and head nodding the way he did when he got into his music. He’d smile, and, if he wasn’t playing too, wave his hands slowly like the music was the only thing in the world. Then Other Red reached the clearing where the music was coming from, and he did see Frankie Lee, sitting and playing at the feet of the member of the Court that had taken him.

Less Starman, Other Red thought, and more Thin White Duke. Thin he certainly was, or maybe a better word was long, half again Other Red’s height with his legs - how many knees was that? - stretched out from his seat, which was carved from an enormous tree stump into intricate, disturbing patterns. He was pale, with a human face but a goat’s disdainful eyes, and he wore leather armor with what looked like a bronze sword on his belt. Other Red stepped into the clearing.

The Gentleman held up a hand, and Frankie Lee stopped playing, though his eyes had been closed. When he saw Other Red, he perked up and made eye contact with him, but didn’t speak.

“What brings you here?” asked the Fair One with disinterest.

Other Red indicated Frankie Lee. “I’d like him back.”

“And what will you give me not to simply keep you here as well?”

“I have nothing to give you, but I bring the tokens of my craft.” From his bag, he pulled a welding mask and a handful of nails. “I’m a shop student. If you don’t let me leave, there will be repercussions.” He tried to keep his voice as confident as he could.

The Shining One stared at him for a long moment, then sat back. “You may leave whenever you please, smith, but you cannot command me to give up my musician.”

Other Red had been expecting that. “A game, then?”

“A game. Very well.” said the Good Neighbor instinctively, and then, coming to himself, “What game do you choose?”

Other Red pulled out the other thing he had packed, and tossed it towards the Blessed One. “Fifth Edition, no expansions. One session, seventh-level characters, fight to the character death. I’ll see you a week from today at eight.” He bent down to quickly kiss Frankie Lee, then turned and left.

***

He’d afforded a week because, as much as he wanted Frankie Lee back right now, he needed time to find a DM who was willing to run this fight. Eventually, a girl named Tyto agreed to do it, for approximately a shitton of carefully-specified snacks. This wasn’t the first time someone had played D&D with one of the Gentry. Sometimes, as now, students figured it was the best chance they had of getting something out of them. Other Red’s challenge was a little unusual in that regard - most such games were essentially attempts to impress the Shining Ones with your storytelling talent. They had great respect for storytellers, and a skilled DM could easily get into their good books. Sometimes, They took a liking to the game, and played just for the sake of playing. Other Red had heard of a campaign that met once a month, on the new moon, where students regularly played alongside their Neighbors. Other Red wasn’t making this a storytelling competition, though. He wasn’t a DM, and he wanted a contest he could win.

On the appointed night, they set up in the game room and waited. Other Red wasn’t using his regular character, Ambrose the halfling rogue, for this. It was stupid, but he didn’t want to to let Them know even that fictional real name. Plus, he felt that if he did lose the fight, Ambrose might somehow be dead for good. He’d rolled up a human bard just for the occasion. It seemed appropriate.

At exactly eight, the Duke walked in. He looked more human here, though he was still morning-frost sharp and pale. He was wearing a black suit, and had his hair in a long braid. Tyto shifted in her chair as he walked past her. Other Red offered him a bag of Doritos. Ritual was important, after all. “Given without obligation,” he added.

“Most kind,” said the Visitor, as he took the bag and produced his character sheet. Other Red looked over it briefly. Tiefling druid. Made sense.

“Well then,” said Tyto. “Let’s get started. You’re standing in the street of a small town. You’ve just gotten into a confrontation in a tavern and decided to take it outside. Roll for initiative.”

***

The fight started out slow and cautious. Both characters had swords, and their initial actions were simple. Attack, roll for damage. Attack, roll for damage. Attack, miss. Attack… As they played, they drew an audience. Not students. Any student who knew what was happening tonight had made plans far, far away. There was a man with hair the color of the sea. Two identical-looking girls, neither of their hands quite right. When they walked in, they were followed by a fox that sat quietly and comfortably on a chair. They all watched in silence as the players spoke their battle into being.

Eventually, Other Red’s opponent seemed to get tired of this pattern. “I cast Flame Blade,” he said, “and attack with it.”
Now they were playing with magic. Other Red surrounded the druid with a cloud of daggers. The druid turned into an eagle and dive-bombed the bard. The audience began to stir. This was almost as exciting as the real thing. A few of them could remember when Gwion and Ceridwen tried the same routine. The bard cast a spell of fear to send the eagle flying away, and another spell to deal it damage. The eagle became a boar and charged the bard.

That was two. He was out of transformations. This was what Other Red had been waiting for. “I cast Dimension Door,” he announced, “on both of us.”

“O… K,” said Tyto.  “You both move to..?”
“500 feet directly above us. And as we start to fall, I cast Feather Fall on myself only.”

Tyto and the Fair One both stopped as they realized what he’d done. “So,” Tyto said to the Gentleman, “You’re falling 500 feet. Do you have anything that might help with that?”

“I do not.”

“Then if you’re alright with it, I don’t think we need to roll to know that you’re pretty dead.”
“No.” He stood up and offered Other Red his hand. “How inventive. The musician is yours.” He left the room without another word, and the audience followed behind. After a moment, the door opened again and Frankie Lee stumbled in. He was shivering, with snow melting on his shoulders and water droplets clinging to his tightly curled hair. It was sixty degrees outside.

Other Red almost knocked his chair back standing up. He held Frankie Lee tightly for a long time, and then pulled away a little.

“What were you thinking?”

“I know, I know. How long was I gone?”

“About a week and a half. How long did you…?”

“Damn. I was only there for a couple of hours. I was starting to run out of Bowie. I tell you what, though, I think I finished that song I was working on.”

“If you finished it while you were There, you should maybe never play that part.”

“Good call.”

 [x]