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{26.01.17}
08/100 days of productivity!! i went to the botanical gardens today!! didnt manage to make any notes but I got to revise the structures & functions of cell organelles!! ヾ(@⌒ー⌒@)ノ today was such a relaxing day!! i laid down on soft grass, listened to hamilton & read a book!!! 🍂

Original ‘Hamilton’ Star Anthony Ramos on His Final Bow, Performing Post-Election & Working With Spike Lee (Billboard):

On Sunday (Nov. 20), actor Anthony Ramos wrapped his epic run in the smash Broadway show and Lin Manuel-Miranda’s cultural juggernaut Hamilton. Since auditioning when the production was merely in its workshop phase, Ramos has enjoyed a front-row seat to theater history playing the dual roles of John Laurens and Phillip Hamilton, two characters that creator Miranda evolved and wrote with him in mind.

As one of the last original cast members to leave the production (only Jasmine Cephas-Jones and Okieriete Onaodowan from the original line-up remain), Ramos is now off to star in the highly anticipated upcoming Netflix series She’s Gotta Have It from Spike Lee.

While the show made headlines this past weekend following actor Brandon Victor Dixon’s message to vice president-elect Mike Pence, who saw the musical with his family on Friday (Nov. 18), Ramos, who spoke with Billboard before the incident, reminisces on Hamilton’s stratospheric ascent into pop culture, the mood at the Richard Rodgers Theater post-election and meeting President Barack Obama.

How does it feel to be wrapping up your time with Hamilton?

A little surreal, but it feels great, man. I don’t regret anything. You know when you leave things and sometimes you say to yourself, “Man, I wish I could have done more?” I don’t feel that way. I feel like I’ve done everything I could, and it feels great. There’s no better time for me to leave than now. I left it all out on stage at the Rogers theater and I’m ready to move on. It feels really good. Bittersweet, honestly.

As one of the last remaining cast members, you’ve experienced others’ final shows, including Lin-Manuel Miranda. What has it been like seeing everyone leave and a new cast takeover?

It feels different when I’m on-stage now because being a part of the original company, you’ve built something with a group of people for an extended amount of time. When those people start to fall off and new people replace them to maintain it, it becomes less about the building and more about the maintenance.

What I’m trying to say is that while I’m meeting new family, there’s nothing like the family that you’ve actually built the thing with and were in the trenches with. The people that are closest to your heart are always the people who were with you when you had nothing. It’s the people who were there when you were planting the seeds and they had their hands in the soil with you. We were all working for 400 dollars a week at the Public Theater and sharing a space downstairs together, so we grew to love each other. That dynamic for me as an original company member is special to me. There’s still so much love in the building, but the vibe is different.

Take me back to your very first show at the Public Theater. What was the mood like? At the time, did it feel special or just another gig?

It’s always been special, never just another gig. The only thing that was going through my mind [during that first curtain call] was, “Thank God I got through that shit. How did that happen just now?” I literally didn’t even know where I was supposed to stand in some scenes but we got through it. The first thing I said was, "Thank you, Jesus” before we did the first bow.

Describe your most memorable show.

Wow, I have to think about this. I have two. One was the show we did for President Obama. We were all so excited. Getting to perform for the leader of the free world was one of the greatest experiences of my life. The energy in the room was different. You felt a presence.

There was something unique about that night, to be on stage and let it all loose for the president. We got to perform this musical about revolution, immigrants, and our founders for the leader of our country. Afterwards he shook my hand and said, “Young man, you are extremely talented.” I was like, “Dude. Wow, bro. Thank you.” The other show was the matinee after the election.

What was that like? The country was in an interesting place that afternoon.

Obviously, there were a lot of emotions. Our company members have been pretty vocal about where we stood in this election. We had a meeting before the matinee and there were tears. We shared words and checked in with each other. There was a lot of anger and frustration. The one conclusion we came to was that you don’t answer anger with more anger. You answer anger with love. You answer anger with selflessness. The answer to anger is always the opposite thing of anger.

This election has sparked a new level of attentiveness and awareness not only in the United States, but in the world. What we were talking about was that we’re blessed to do this show, and we can’t take it for granted. People are coming to see this show for a little piece of hope, and we try to be aware that this isn’t just a show. For the people coming into this theater each night, their lives are vulnerable, fragile and precious, and we have to handle with care. Not only of the people in the theater, but who we come in contact with in person and in life, period. We took all of that into that matinee, which became one of my most memorable performances.

If you would have told me my most memorable performance would have happened two years into my run, I would have been like, “Yeah, right,” but I’d say it was even more special than opening night. The audience is always a part of the show but the audience was never more a part of the show than that day. The most special moment for me in my entire Hamilton run was the moment I came downstage and turned to the three guys and sang, “Raise a glass to freedom, something they can never take away no matter what they tell you” and the audience roared at that line and clapped. That had never happened before. That right there was the moment I said, “Everything’s going to be alright and we’re all in this together, no matter who the president is, and we can never forget that.”

Unlike any other show, Hamilton has had the most incredible array of luminaries and icons coming to experience it. Beyond President Obama, who are some visitors who have stood out to you?

Laurence Fishburne hugged me like he knew me forever. I remember when we were at the Public Theater, Busta Rhymes gave us a 30-minute speech about how our show motivated him and made him rethink what he wants his next album to be like. That was an incredible moment. And Marc Anthony! I’d blast his salsa albums with my mom. He gave me a huge hug and said, “Kid, I’m so proud of you.” That moment was particularly special to me. I think those moments all stood out to me the most.

[…]

read the rest of this great interview here!

OKAY so at the beginning of know who you are, maui’s on his little haka-rock. the next time we see him is on te fiti’s island, when the ocean dumps him on te fiti and gives him a watery middle finger as it recedes. my question is, how did he get in the water?

possibility one is that the ocean went “hey, you abandoned moana, you’re terrible”, and just kinda kidnapped him off his tiny rock. which makes sense, because he did disrespect its chosen one. how rude, maui.

or, concept: maui swims. because moana is turning back toward te ka, the demon that is actively trying to kill her. she’s holding the heart in one hand, y’know, the homing beacon of death. she has neither a harpoon nor an oar. and maui can’t hear her. (he can’t hear her greatest weapon - her mind and her voice.) 

so what does he do? this precious mortal that he left to die, about to get smote by te ka - what does he do? 

he swims, of course. back into the ocean he goes. because he knows what it’s like to be abandoned, and now he knows what it’s like to abandon, and it’s odd, swimming with hands and feet and not gills and fins and maui’s kinda bad at swimming but he does it anyway. 

because he will not abandon moana again.

(and the ocean stops - thinks - maybe he does deserve to stand before te fiti. maybe he does deserve to stand next to moana once more.)

product: “leave this on your face while you sleep and it will work overnight to nourish and repair your skin! many people successfully do this uwu”

my tossing, turning ass: “okay… that sounds fake but okay…”

Random things that makes me think of the orbiting human circus of the air:

-Electroswing music (like caravan palace) 

-When you leave a theatre production and that buzz sticks with you for the rest of the night.

-Polar bear cookies.

-Soft seats at the cinema that get you fully immersed in the film your watching.

-when snow first starts falling and you see snowflakes on your eyelashes

-Jukeboxes with outdated songs in them.

-radio static interrupted by bursts of song then more static

-the soft echo of metal shaking in the wind

and warm woollen hats.

Another small bit of characterization the anime missed.

My favorite product by @sheamoisture love coconut oil and all of the benefits that come along with it. You can use it for just about anything. Below are a few things that you can use coconut oil for: 1. Makeup Remover. Even the most resistant waterproof mascara doesn’t stand a chance against coconut oil. Apply it directly to the face as an oil cleanser, or let it sit on your skin with a cotton pad. Makeup will melt away.
2. Breath Freshener. Coconut oil has antifungal and antibacterial properties. Gargling for 20 minutes with a spoonful of oil (a.k.a. oil pulling) can help clear up germs in the mouth, leading to fresher breath, whiter teeth, and healthier gums.
3. Lice Remedy. Start this all-natural lice treatment with a rinse of apple cider vinegar. Once the vinegar has dried, apply coconut oil to the entire head and let it sit for 12 to 24 hours. Brush through hair with a fine comb, then shampoo.
4. Body Lotion. If you’re a DIY mixologist, then coconut oil is a vanity essential. You can use this versatile oil as the base to make your own body moisturizer.
5. Cuticle Oil. Got cracked cuticles? Remedy peeling skin with a coconut oil balm right at the base of nails. It can also help your manicure last longer.
6. Makeup-Brush Cleaner. Cleaning your makeup brushes should be a monthly ritual. You can use a DIY cleanser that’s two parts antibacterial soap and one part coconut oil.
7. Lip Balm. Coconut oil is the ideal remedy for chapped lips especially because it’s semisolid at room temperature. Pack a bit in a miniature jar and smooth over lips throughout the day.
8. Stretch-Mark Cream. Expectant moms should keep a jar of coconut oil nearby to help ward off stretch marks, but anyone can use this as a topical treatment for scars. While the oil won’t fade any marks, it can help prevent dark spots and blisters from forming.
9. Undereye Cream.Don’t want to spend the extra money on eye cream? Use a dab of coconut oil on undereye bags and fine lines. It’s light enough for the most delicate skin on your face.
10. Body Scrub. Mix half a cup of coconut oil with a handful of coarse salt or sugar to create an exfoliator. The moisturizing oil will last long after the grains have melted away.
11. Frizz Tamer. Flyaways begone with this smoothing treatment. Just rub a dime-size amount in your hands and smooth from midshaft to ends for frizz-free style that’s high on shine.
12. Massage Oil. Warm coconut oil in the microwave and add a few drops of an essential oil, like lavender or peppermint, for a soothing massage mix.
13. Whitening Toothpaste. Run out of toothpaste? Grab the closest jar of coconut oil and add baking soda for a quick fix. Everyone will wonder how you got such a white smile.
14. Shaving Cream. Who said shaving cream has to lather? Use this balm as a base to get a closer shave that leaves legs smooth instead of dried out. You can also use it alone or with other ingredients in this DIY shave-cream recipe.
15. Dandruff Treatment. Dandruff and dry scalp go hand in hand. So send moisture right to the roots with a nightly coconut oil treatment. Just apply lightly to roots and massage in, which will also stimulate hair growth.
16. Body Oil. Why purchase a separate body oil when you can keep coconut oil near the bath? Just slather it on wet skin after the shower, then pat dry. You’ll smell like a beach vacation all day. Plus, it has a natural SPF 4.
17. Itch Relief. Burns, bug bites, and bruises can all be soothed with a topical balm of coconut oil.
18. Deep Conditioner. You can use hot coconut oil as a preshampoo treatment to soothe dry hair before you shampoo and condition. Leave in for at least an hour for an allover moisturizing treatment.
19. Night Cream. Apply coconut oil at night for maximum moisturizing benefits. The antioxidants are great for smoothing fine lines and wrinkles while you sleep.
20. Leave-in Conditioner. Hydrate dry hair by using coconut oil as a leave-in conditioner. Apply a small amount to wet strands to seal in moisture.

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64 days in heaven and hell (96)
Day 11 (ctd.)
As these 4 works clearly demonstrate, Vincent’s two complementary ‘Falling Autumn Leaves’ works were a product of the exchange of ideas with Émile Bernard and Paul Gauguin.
The first painting shows Bernard’s sister Madeleine. She once refused to be more than a muse to Gauguin. An intriguing story.

Émile Bernard, Madeleine au Bois d’Amour (Madeleine in the Bois d'Amour), 1888. Oil on canvas, 138 x 163 cm. Musée d'Orsay, Paris 
Vincent Van Gogh, Les Alyscamps - Falling Leaves, c. November 1, 1888. Oil on burlap, 73 x 92 cm. Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, Netherlands (F 486, JH 1620)
Vincent Van Gogh, Les Alyscamps - Falling Autumn Leaves, c. November 2, 1888. Oil on burlap, 72 x 91. Private collection (F 487, JH 1621)
Paul Gauguin, Blue Trees ‘Your Turn Will Come, My Beauty!, 1888. Oil on burlap, 93 x 73 cm. Ordrupgaard, Copenhagen