learning targets

  • Me: should I learn another language....?
  • IRL friends: NO NO NO HELLLL NO. THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU'RE DOING. THINK ABOUT YOUR FAMILY, YOUR RELATIONSHIPS, YOUR HEALTH, YOUR GRADES. JUST DON'T OKAY?
  • Langblr friends: OMG YASSSSSSSSS WHAT ARE YOU GONNA STUDY? NO WAIT LET ME HELP YOU CHOOSE HOW ABOUT GREENLANDIC? OR MAYBE JAPANESE? THE POSSIBILITIES ARE ENDLESS. IN FACT, YOU COULD LEARN SEVERAL MORE. THE MORE THE MERRIER AHAHAHAHA
How i study languages

A couple of days ago @bonbonlanguage asked if i have a post about what i do in order to learn a new language so i thought i should try to make a post about that.

The beginning

As a beginner i always do the same stuff. I research a couple of apps or i just see if my favourite choices have a version for my target language. Usually i use: 

Memrise
Fun Easy Learn
9000 words
50Languages
HiNative
babbel, busuu (rarely but i still have them on my phone)

+some sites and specific apps only for my target language

I choose a grammar book and i take notes from from it. So far i chose books from 3 collections: Teach Yourself, Colloquial and For Dummies.

How i take notes from a book

I ignore the excercises, in my notebook you will see only grammar notes and sometimes irregular verbs at the end, but you will never see exercises. (i’ll say later what i do with the exercises)
If the book has a pretty good structure, i just copy what’s in there. (when i say good structure i mean that i can’t extract main ideas or just a formula              e.g. stem+ending)
The theory is written in black or blue, the examples are written with a pencil and if there is a keyword, i highlight it. When i have languages with articles based on the gender of the words, like French, i use a pink and a light blue pen so when i study the articles i can see the difference. 
Now, i said that in my notebook you won’t see exercises, true, that’s because i solve them on another notebook or just on a blank sheet of paper. If your book has exercises after the grammar lesson, solve them. If half of them are wrong, you will take a break of 1-2 days (in which you will study the grammar rules) and when you feel prepared, you solve again those exercises. (you are allowed to have mistakes but try to have at least 70% of the exercises correct).
What i do after i finish a book
After i finish that grammar book, i take another one. However, this time i don’t copy-paste like i did the first time. I read what informations are there and if there are new rules/exceptions, i just write them on a sticky note and add it to my notebook. After i finish my 2nd book i usually move on to the next stage but if i feel that i missed out something, i take a 3rd book and do what i did with the 2nd one.
As a beginner i have the habit to read my notes once a week, as an intermediate learner i rarely do that.

Don’t understand that as a beginner you only take notes! Sometimes when i get bored i just study on memrise/vocabulary app and that sometimes can last 1 week, sometimes 2. I even like to use InternetPolyglot with my target language and an old target language. (e.g. I learn new words in Spanish through Danish) 

After i have a proper notebook

Usually when i finish my book and i add all the exceptions/rules that i found in the 2nd book i also have learned 1.500-2.000 words in that period of time so i want to test my skills.

When i feel confident enough, i start using duolingo. I use it as a test tool, not as a learning one! I take the shortcuts and usually in 2 days i finish a tree. (at the last part of the tree you don’t have a shortcut for everything so you just have to take the shortcut of every skill there which gets boring)

Since Duolingo is pretty advanced with his lessons, at the end i can consider myself a B1 learner. (if you have an amazing memory and skills, you can say you are B2, but Duolingo can’t get you further than that)

The intermediate stage

Whoever followed my blog for a while knows that i have 2 nightmares in my language learning journey, the intermediate stage and the irregular verbs.

For how to overcome a plateau in the intermediate stage i made a post here. (sooner or later you will hit a plateau)

Back to what i do. No book anymore, duolingo is done, this is the moment when i start to use my skills. If i didn’t use 50Languages as a beginner, i use it now. It has 100 audios so i use them to get used to the sound of the words in case i don’t know them and i also use it as a resources to learn new words. On Memrise i try to find advanced/intermediate and i use 9000 words and Fun Easy Learn. 

At this level the main problem is the lack of vocabulary so i try to learn as many new words as i can. However, since using apps can get boring after a while, i use the classic method of learning vocabulary, reading.

How i memorize/learn new words

Most of the time i just use apps/sites. However, everyone had moments when we couldn’t remember a word regardless of how many times we tried to memorize it. When i have to deal with this, i usually make a mnemonic. (e.g. afslutte = to finish, to end, to conclude; in order to remember the meaning i think at a key sentence: If you don’t study you’ll END up as a slut. [harsh example, i know, but it stays in my mind])

If my mnemonic method doesn’t work, i write the word a couple of times, sometimes with my left hand too since i focus more then. (i’m right-handed) and if i still can’t remember the meaning, i’ll start making some sentences where i’ll use that word.

How i read in my target language

Just as a side note, if i feel confident with my skills (that has happened only once) i read books, if not, i read comics until i feel confident enough to try books.

I have 2 methods because sometimes the first one doesn’t work. So, for French i just read and try to guess the meaning of a word and if i can’t, then i search it. Why i do this for French? It’s easier somehow and i can guess the meaning very well. Sometimes i even highlight words and search the meaning later just to analyze them more.

However, this method doesn’t work on Danish. For Danish i have to read once the entire paragraph and then see what i understood from it. If there is a certain word that it’s unknown, i’ll search it. Since Danish has a lot of structures, i tend to use HiNative to translate those because normal online translators aren’t good for these. After i have all the unknown words, i will look over the paragraph again.

With all these unknown words, i usually make flashcards on Quizlet and practice them from time to time.

Sometimes when i’m in a hurry or i’m not in the mood for studying new words in big quantities, i use WordBrewery or Clozemaster. When i use these i always write the new words on a piece of paper or i just add them directly to Quizlet.

HiNative

I mentioned it above so i should tell you how i use it in order to improve since many might not be familiar to it. It’s an app where you ask questions and natives will answer.  I use HiNative mostly after i read, watch a movie or learn something from memrise.

For what i use it?

- ask for differences
- ask for examples with new words that i didn’t find a context for
- ask for translation from target language to English since not everything is easy to translate as a beginner/intermediate

Listening skills

Listening is a very interesting skill because you can combine it with speaking and reading or just focus only on it.

Listening+reading

In this category you find movies/cartoon/series with subs. Usually i don’t do anything when i watch series/movies because i guess the meaning of the unknown words but if there is a certain word that i can’t understand, i will write it down and search it’s meaning.

Listening+speaking

This involves 2 things. I either talk to someone or i just talk to myself/a toy/the cat. I tend to use the 2nd method most of the time. (it’s not that i dislike talking, i just don’t feel confident enough to use my skills until i’m not sure that i know most of the things/vocab i need to know). I start the conversation like “hey, how are you?” and then i ask myself “how was your day?”. For this question i have to make 2 answers, the reality with what has happened, and an imaginary version for my other side who’s “talking”.

Listening

Here i just watch videos on youtube, listen to 50languages, a podcast or songs. If i do listen to songs, sometimes i try to find the lyrics and see if i understand everything, if not, i’ll look for the unknown words and after i start to sing too. (disney songs are great because most have lyrics on youtube already)

Writing skills

Here i have 2 choices, i either find someone or i just write in a notebook/diary. The purpose of this is to figure out what vocab/structures/expressions i don’t know. 

Speaking skills

It’s not that i dislike talking, i just focus on this skill at the end usually. I improve my other skills and the speaking one improves in a weird way too. However, at some point i just ask people who i know for a long time and i feel comfortable with to talk to me on skype/on the phone.

Extra

Idioms are everywhere in a language. At some point you have to deal with them. If i find them on memrise, i study them there, if not, i’ll look for them and make flashcards. These flashcards have only the idiom in my target language on them and that’s it. I don’t write the translation. I force myself to remember the meaning.

Also, when i don’t know the pronunciation for something, i use Forvo.

The advanced stage

Here i just learn idioms and some advanced vocabulary at the beginning. After these, i stop caring. I consider my learning journey almost done so i just enjoy my life using the language. I read without worrying that i don’t know words, i watch shows without worrying that i don’t understand what i hear, i can sing without worrying that i just say words with no meaning but similar sounds to what i hear.

Note: This is how I learn languages. I can’t say it will work for everyone but it works for me.

p.s. sometimes Fun Easy Learn and 50Languages are set in another language, not my native one or English.

How to Create a Language Learning Schedule (+ Printable)

I recently set up a new language learning schedule for myself and I thought some of you might find my approach useful, so I decided to create a short guide and a printable (you can download it as a pdf here). Lots of people struggle with finding a way to study several languages at once (I do, too, as I’m currently learning 5 languages) and I think having a good plan is essential!

As you can see, it’s quite simple. Once you have downloaded the printable, you can create a perfect schedule for yourself in a few easy steps:

1. Define your goals

First of all, you should know why you need this schedule and for how long you want to stick with it. Do you want to plan your studies for next week, the next month or the entire term or (school) year? What exactly do you want to learn until the end of that time period? How many words, how many grammar topics, how many levels in your favorite language learning app? You need to answer these questions in order to be able to estimate how much time you should / can / want to spend on your target languages every day.

2. List your languages and resources

Secondly, you should make a list in which you mention the resources, methods and tools you want to use for each language. It should look something like this (the more detailed, the better):

3. Divide your resources into categories

I put six categories on the printable. Use a color code to show which resource belongs in which category:

4. Almost there…

There are a few things you should consider before creating the actual schedule:

  • How much work and time do you need to put in to reach your goals?
  • How much time do you actually have in a normal week? When do you want to study?
  • Are all of your target languages equally important? How often do you want to study language 1,2,3,…?
  • Do you have any classes that you have to prepare for / do homework for? If yes, you can include that in your schedule!
  • Do you want to avoid studying two similar languages in one day?
  • Do you want to focus on a special skill?

5. Set up your schedule!

Goals, resources, time management - you’re ready to make a detailed plan! Here is a random example:

In case you were wondering “why do the whole coloring thing and list your resources and everything” - I think this is a way to avoid procrastination. Let’s say it’s Friday, so you should be learning French vocab (orange) and practise listening (green) in Spanish. Now, if you never made a list with all your resources, you might end up wasting your time on tumblr or google searching for “Spanish listening practice” and reading arbitrary posts or watching videos you already know without really doing anything because you just don’t know what to do. If you consider your list, you will know that for Spanish, you will either have to watch a movie or listen to some music, and for French, you will have to do either Memrise or Anki. As I said before, this gets easier if your list is more detailed. Actual tasks like “watch a movie on website x about y with subtitles in language z” will force you to work with what you’ve got and use the methods and resources you already know. I read so many posts like “I keep downloading textbooks for that language but I never use any of them, I just keep downloading more” and this won’t happen to you if you use the list!

I guess that’s pretty much it… I hope you like the printable, enjoy your studies!

The Siren’s “Learn Your Lesson” Hex

Originally posted by allie-rva

This is a hex that will cause your target to learn their lesson and make their blunders come to light, whether it be fucking with you, a loved one, a friend, whatever. This hex will make them learn.

What You’ll Need

  • A sea shell with their name written on it
  • Another sea shell, preferably the same type and size as the shell with the name on it
  • Black string
  • Metal tongs
  • Paper
  • Pencil/Pen
  • Black Candle
  • Black Salt
  • Salt Water

What To Do

  • Write each wrong they’ve done on separate pieces of paper.
  • Burn each paper from the black candle and place each burning paper into the shell with the tongs.
  • Sprinkle black salt onto the ashes inside the shell and flick the salt water over it while saying/thinking “Each wrong you’ve done to me and others will come to light and your errors will cost you, you will be treated the same by friends and strangers as you have treated others until you learn your lesson and make amends with everyone you’ve hurt.”
  • Take the other shell and tie it to the shell with ashes in it to close the ashes inside.
  • Bury the shell in a spot that will be shaded most parts of the day.
  • Once you feel they’ve learned their lesson you can break the hex by digging it up and pouring the ashes and salt into a fire.

If you can I’d recommend doing this at nighttime, outdoors in the general direction of where the sea is from you.

How to deal with losing interest in your language class:

As a student in a higher-level French and who is self-studying two other languages, I know for a fact that taking a foreign language can get stressful and overwhelming. To learn a ton of grammar, humongous amounts of vocab, and to know how a mind in another culture works, it can get super hard sometimes. All that stuff that goes into learning a foreign language can make it super easy to get burnt-out. And we’ve all done it. Trust me. But, it’s okay, my dude. We’ve all been there. It sucks, but you’ll get over it. Here are some tips how: 

i. take your time 

Listen, my dudes, it can be so difficult to learn a foreign language and you should already be proud of yourself for doing so!! Even in a fast-paced class, you should take it slow and make sure you don’t beat yourself over not getting it in perfect time. Language takes practice, and sometimes we don’t get it as fast as we want it. it’s okay. 

ii. ask questions/talk to the professor

Are you totally lost? Tell someone. It could be a classmate, a native speaker you’ve befriended, or your instructor. Either way, I highly recommend you talk to someone if you’re stuck on a specific concept or feel unmotivated. You sometimes need a boost from a study buddy in your target language. 

iii. remember why you’re studying

My go-to method for when I’m having a bad day in French or I’m just not getting something is simple. I simply ask myself: “Why am I doing this?” No reason is not good enough for choosing to learn a specific language. Learning languages has its benefits and even if you just like the sound of it is reason enough to learn it! Trust me, I have no incentive for learning my target language. But I love it, and I refuse to give it up when it gets difficult. 

iv. study on your own 

To be honest, this is super super important anyway. You absolutely NEED to practice a language on your own, whether you feel like it or not. Without some practice, you’re going to feel completely lost in class sometimes. You can have fun with this too: take this time to familiarize yourself with the culture more. Personally, it’s always helpful to watch movies in French or listen to music in Spanish. I learn to enjoy my target language more and to have fun with it!

v. take a break

We all get unmotivated sometimes. Yeah, language learning takes a lot of work, but sometimes it helps to take a step back and refresh a little. Focus on other schoolwork or maybe find something new to occupy your time. Being burnt out on learning a language sucks, I know, but sometimes it’s best to ride the wave a little bit. 

Spanish Vegetarian Vocabulary

These are some useful Spanish phrases for if you’re vegetarian or vegan :)

Soy vegetariano/a - I’m vegetarian
Soy vegano/a - I’m vegan
Soy vegetariano/a estricto/a - I’m vegan
No como… - I don’t eat…
No bebo… - I don’t drink…
No tomo… - I don’t eat/drink…
Solo como - I only eat…
Carne - meat
Carne de res - beef
Cerdo - pork
Pollo - chicken
Conejo - rabbit
Cordero - lamb
Salchichas - sausages
Pescado - fish
Huevos - eggs
Leche - milk
Mantequilla - butter
Queso - cheese
Productos animales - animal products
Solo como carne de acuerdo con la ley islámica - I only eat halal meat
¿Tiene una opción vegetariana? - Do you have a vegetarian option?
¿Puede prepararlo sin carne? - Can you make it without meat?
¿Contiene carne? - Does it contain meat?

Trying out new colored pencils

Curses & Maledictions 101

A curse or malediction is a spell that is performed with malintent. These kinds of spells are generally performed to cause misery, pain, strife, and/or destruction upon a target. 

Basic Terminology:

  • Baneful - causing destruction or serious damage
  • Curse - a spell performed with malintent
  • Hex - used interchangeably with “curse” or “jinx”
  • Jinx - said to be a lesser form of baneful magick; also used interchangeably with “curse” and “hex”
  • Malintent - “bad” or negative intent 
  • Target - the person on which you are performing the spell
  • Taglock - a personal item belonging to or describing the target (description of the target, a piece of DNA, their signature, their name written on paper, a poppet designed to represent them, etc.)

Steps to Casting a Curse:

  1. Exhaust all mundane methods of resolving an issue before resorting to cursing. 
  2. Educate yourself on various methods of protection before even thinking about casting a curse. 
  3. Know what you’re doing. Research, plan ahead, and set your intentions straight in your mind to prevent any kind of backlash from the curse. This means, be specific. Be sure that your curse is aimed at your target/s, and no one else, including yourself. 
  4. When gathering ingredients, be sure that the correspondences match your intent. 
  5. Be aware of any health risks that are associated with the ingredients you choose to use in your curse - for example, certain baneful herbs can be harmful when burned, ingested, or even touched. 
  6. Formulate a curse that fits the crime in question. 
  7. Set conditions for your curse, including some kind of “failsafe.” If you don’t want your curse to last indefinitely, be sure to acknowledge that. Set some kind of time limit, such as “when the target learns their lesson, this curse will be lifted.” 
  8. Methods of cursing can include the construction of poppets, jar spells, sachets, effigies, sigils, or pretty much any other type of spell you can come up with. 
  9. When you have constructed a taglock for your target, gathered your ingredients, and ultimately decided how you want to carry out your curse, you’re ready to cast it. 
  10. Before actually casting the curse, set up some kind of method of protection, whether it be a ward, a shield, a circle, or calling upon external forces to protect you. 
  11. Meditate on your intent and clear your mind. Be sure you are free from distractions before performing the curse.
  12. After you’ve performed your curse, clean up your space, and do some deep cleansing - cleanse the area in which you performed the curse, cleanse yourself, and cleanse your entire home. 
  13. Perform some self-care - eat something, take a bath/shower, drink water, and get a good night’s sleep.

Curse Correspondences

French Vegetarian Vocabulary

I made this list a while ago in Spanish which can be found here and I thought I’d make it again in French :)

Je suis végétarien(ne) - I am vegetarian

Je suis végétalien(ne) - I am vegan

Je ne mange pas… - I don’t eat…

Je ne bois pas… - I don’t drink…

Je ne prends pas… - I don’t eat/drink…

Je ne mange que… - I only eat…

La viande - meat

Le bœuf - beef

Le porc - pork

Le poulet - chicken

Le lapin - rabbit

L’agneau - lamb

Les saucisses - sausages

Le poisson - fish

Les œufs - eggs

Le lait - milk

Le beurre - butter

Le fromage - cheese

Les produits animaux - animal products

Je ne mange que la viande halal - I only eat halal meat

Avez-vous des plats végétariens? - Do you have a vegetarian option?

Pouvez-vous le préparer sans viande? - Can you make it without meat?

Est-ce que ça contient de la viande? - Does it contain meat?

..is it too much to ask?!

For a PDF of the 8th grade ELA common core standards broken into specific, scaffolded skills that would build up from day-to-day, then week to week?

I need something smaller and more specific than learning targets, but some of these skills are so intertwined with one another, it feels like I can’t break them down further.

Originally posted by simplybridal

…help?

kaitlynthomas4792  asked:

How do you throw throwing knives properly?

well, first off you need a good throwing knife. knives are like people: most of them are good for one thing but not for others, like steve with throwing shields and steve with applying basic common sense. or like thor with electrocuting things and eating spicy foods. or clint with shooting arrows and basically any other facet of human life. 

anyway, a good throwing knife will be quite sharp on the point but blunted along the sides–sticks in the target but doesn’t cut your hands. the point and blade should be pretty thick, and the fewer perforations in the blade the better. throwing knives have to withstand a hard impact without breaking, so you want a decent quality knife, and the heavier it is (within limits) the less force you’ll need on your throw. 

you’ll want a good target to learn with, something big and soft enough that you’ll hit it and that your knife will embed so you know where you hit, but not so soft the knives fall out. deadpool may volunteer for this job. do not take him up on it. the commentary is not worth it.

grip the tip of the knife vertically between the pad of your thumb and the side of your index fingers. hold it firmly enough that it won’t slide in your grip but not too hard. 

stand with the foot on the side of your throwing hand pointed at your target, spine straight. start close to the target (another reason not to use deadpool–blood splatters farther than you think) and work your way back as you figure things out. the biggest part is learning to throw with enough force and rotation so the pointy end sticks in your target. it’ll take time, and there’s really no shortcut for just putting in the practice hours. 

if this does not work out for you, i recommend grenades for all your low-accuracy distance combat needs. 

Musical Instruments

La Flauta Flute

El Oboe oboe

El Clarinete Clarinet 

EL Saxofón / El Saxofóno Saxophone

El Fagot Bassoon

La Trompeta Trumpet

El Trombón Trombone 

El Euforio / El Euphonium Euphonuim 

El Barítono Baritone

La Tuba Tuba

El Flautín / El Piccolo Piccolo

El Violín Violin 

La Viola Viola 

El Bajo Bass

El Piano Piano

El Arpa Harp

El Xilófono xylophone

La Marimba Marimba

El Tambor Drum

La Trampa Snare

Las Campanas Bells

Los Cimbalos Cymballs

El Violonchelo / Cello Cello

El Cuerno Francés / El Corno Francés French Horn

  • When I wake up: I could be learning my target language rn
  • When I'm at school: I could be learning my target language rn
  • When I'm at work: I could be learning my target language rn
  • When I'm literally doing anything except learning my target language: I could be learning my target language rn