learning impairment

123 Ideas for Character Flaws
  1. Absent-minded - Preoccupied to the extent of being unaware of one’s immediate surroundings. Abstracted, daydreaming, inattentive, oblivious, forgetful.
  2. Abusive - Characterized by improper infliction of physical or psychological maltreatment towards another.
  3. Addict - One who is addicted to a compulsive activity. Examples: gambling, drugs, sex.
  4. Aimless - Devoid of direction or purpose.
  5. Alcoholic - A person who drinks alcoholic substances habitually and to excess.
  6. Anxious - Full of mental distress or uneasiness because of fear of danger or misfortune; greatly worried; solicitous.
  7. Arrogant - Having or displaying a sense of overbearing self-worth or self-importance. Inclined to social exclusiveness and who rebuff the advances of people considered inferior. Snobbish.
  8. Audacious - Recklessly bold in defiance of convention, propriety, law, or the like; insolent; braze, disobedient.
  9. Bad Habit - A revolting personal habit. Examples: picks nose, spits tobacco, drools, bad body odour.
  10. Bigmouth - A loud-mouthed or gossipy person.
  11. Bigot - One who is strongly partial to one’s own group, religion, race, or politics and is intolerant of those who differ.
  12. Blunt - Characterized by directness in manner or speech; without subtlety or evasion. Frank, callous, insensitive, brusque.
  13. Bold - In a bad sense, too forward; taking undue liberties; over assuming or confident; lacking proper modesty or restraint; rude; impudent. Abrupt, brazen, cheeky, brassy, audacious.
  14. Callous - They are hardened to emotions, rarely showing any form of it in expression. Unfeeling. Cold.
  15. Childish - Marked by or indicating a lack of maturity; puerile.
  16. Complex - An exaggerated or obsessive concern or fear. (List specific complex.)
  17. Cruel - Mean to anyone or anything, without care or regard to consequences and feelings.
  18. Cursed - A person who has befallen a prayer for evil or misfortune, placed under a spell, or borne into an evil circumstance, and suffers for it. Damned.
  19. Dependent - Unable to exist, sustain oneself, or act appropriately or normally without the assistance or direction of another.
  20. Deranged - Mentally decayed. Insane. Crazy. Mad. Psychotic.
  21. Dishonest – Given to or using fraud, cheating; deceitful, deceptive, crooked, underhanded.
  22. Disloyal - Lacking loyalty. Unfaithful, perfidious, traitorous, treasonable
  23. Disorder - An ailment that affects the function of mind or body. (List the disorders name if they have one.) See the Mental Disorder List.
  24. Disturbed - Showing some or a few signs or symptoms of mental or emotional illness. Confused, disordered, neurotic, troubled.
  25. Dubious - Fraught with uncertainty or doubt. Undecided, doubtful, unsure.
  26. Dyslexic - Affected by dyslexia, a learning disorder marked by impairment of the ability to recognize and comprehend written words.
  27. Egotistical - Characteristic of those having an inflated idea of their own importance. Boastful, pompous.
  28. Envious - Showing extreme cupidity; painfully desirous of another’s advantages; covetous, jealous.
  29. Erratic - Deviating from the customary course in conduct or opinion; eccentric: erratic behaviour. Eccentric, bizarre, outlandish, strange.
  30. Fanatical - Fanatic outlook or behaviour especially as exhibited by excessive enthusiasm, unreasoning zeal, or wild and extravagant notions on some subject.
  31. Fickle – Erratic, changeable, unstable - especially with regard to affections or attachments; capricious.
  32. Fierce - Marked by extreme intensity of emotions or convictions; inclined to react violently; fervid.
  33. Finicky - Excessively particular or fastidious; difficult to please; fussy. Too much concerned with detail. Meticulous, fastidious, choosy, critical, picky, prissy, pernickety.
  34. Fixated - In psychoanalytic theory, a strong attachment to a person or thing, especially such an attachment formed in childhood or infancy and manifested in immature or neurotic behaviour that persists throughout life. Fetish, quirk, obsession, infatuation.
  35. Flirt -To make playfully romantic or sexual overtures; behaviour intended to arouse sexual interest. Minx. Tease.
  36. Gluttonous - Given to excess in consumption of especially food or drink. Voracious, ravenous, wolfish, piggish, insatiable.
  37. Gruff - Brusque or stern in manner or appearance. Crusty, rough, surly.
  38. Gullible - Will believe any information given, regardless of how valid or truthful it is, easily deceived or duped.
  39. Hard - A person who is difficult to deal with, manage, control, overcome, or understand. Hard emotions, hard hearted.
  40. Hedonistic - Pursuit of or devotion to pleasure, especially to the pleasures of the senses.
  41. Hoity-toity- Given to flights of fancy; capricious; frivolous. Prone to giddy behaviour, flighty.
  42. Humourless - The inability to find humour in things, and most certainly in themselves.
  43. Hypocritical - One who is always contradicting their own beliefs, actions or sayings. A person who professes beliefs and opinions for others that he does not hold. Being a hypocrite.
  44. Idealist - One whose conduct is influenced by ideals that often conflict with practical considerations. One who is unrealistic and impractical, guided more by ideals than by practical considerations.
  45. Idiotic - Marked by a lack of intelligence or care; foolish or careless.
  46. Ignorant - Lacking knowledge or information as to a particular subject or fact. Showing or arising from a lack of education or knowledge.
  47. Illiterate - Unable to read and write.
  48. Immature - Emotionally undeveloped; juvenile; childish.
  49. Impatient - Unable to wait patiently or tolerate delay; restless. Unable to endure irritation or opposition; intolerant.
  50. Impious - Lacking piety and reverence for a god/gods and their followers.
  51. Impish - Naughtily or annoyingly playful.
  52. Incompetent - Unable to execute tasks, no matter how the size or difficulty.
  53. Indecisive - Characterized by lack of decision and firmness, especially under pressure.
  54. Indifferent - The trait of lacking enthusiasm for or interest in things generally, remaining calm and seeming not to care; a casual lack of concern. Having or showing little or no interest in anything; languid; spiritless.
  55. Infamy - Having an extremely bad reputation, public reproach, or strong condemnation as the result of a shameful, criminal, or outrageous act that affects how others view them.
  56. Intolerant - Unwilling to tolerate difference of opinion and narrow-minded about cherished opinions.
  57. Judgemental - Inclined to make and form judgements, especially moral or personal ones, based on one’s own opinions or impressions towards others/practices/groups/religions based on appearance, reputation, occupation, etc.
  58. Klutz - Clumsy. Blunderer.
  59. Lazy - Resistant to work or exertion; disposed to idleness.
  60. Lewd - Inclined to, characterized by, or inciting to lust or lechery; lascivious. Obscene or indecent, as language or songs; salacious.
  61. Liar - Compulsively and purposefully tells false truths more often than not. A person who has lied or who lies repeatedly.
  62. Lustful - Driven by lust; preoccupied with or exhibiting lustful desires.
  63. Masochist - The deriving of sexual gratification, or the tendency to derive sexual gratification, from being physically or emotionally abused. A willingness or tendency to subject oneself to unpleasant or trying experiences.
  64. Meddlesome - Intrusive in a meddling or offensive manner, given to meddling; interfering.
  65. Meek - Evidencing little spirit or courage; overly submissive or compliant; humble in spirit or manner; suggesting retiring mildness or even cowed submissiveness.
  66. Megalomaniac - A psycho pathological condition characterized by delusional fantasies of wealth, power, or omnipotence.
  67. Naïve - Lacking worldly experience and understanding, simple and guileless; showing or characterized by a lack of sophistication and critical judgement.
  68. Nervous - Easily agitated or distressed; high-strung or jumpy.
  69. Non-violent - Abstaining from the use of violence.
  70. Nosey - Given to prying into the affairs of others; snoopy. Offensively curious or inquisitive.
  71. Obsessive - An unhealthy and compulsive preoccupation with something or someone.
  72. Oppressor - A person of authority who subjects others to undue pressures, to keep down by severe and unjust use of force or authority.
  73. Overambitious - Having a strong excessive desire for success or achievement.
  74. Overconfident - Excessively confident; presumptuous.
  75. Overemotional - Excessively or abnormally emotional. Sensitive about themselves and others, more so than the average person.
  76. Overprotective - To protect too much; coddle.
  77. Overzealous - Marked by excessive enthusiasm for and intense devotion to a cause or idea.
  78. Pacifist - Opposition to war or violence as a means of resolving disputes. (Can double as a merit in certain cases)
  79. Paranoid - Exhibiting or characterized by extreme and irrational fear or distrust of others.
  80. Peevish - Expressing fretfulness and discontent, or unjustifiable dissatisfaction. Cantankerous, cross, ill-tempered, testy, captious, discontented, crotchety, cranky, ornery.
  81. Perfectionist - A propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards.
  82. Pessimist - A tendency to stress the negative or unfavourable or to take the gloomiest possible view.
  83. Pest - One that pesters or annoys, with or without realizing it. Nuisance. Annoying. Nag.
  84. Phobic – They have a severe form of fear when it comes to this one thing. Examples: Dark, Spiders, Cats
  85. Practical - Level-headed, efficient, and unspeculative. No-nonsense.
  86. Predictable - Easily seen through and assessable, where almost anyone can predict reactions and actions of said person by having met or known them even for a short time.
  87. Proud - Filled with or showing excessive self-esteem and will often shirk help from others for the sake of pride.
  88. Rebellious - Defying or resisting some established authority, government, or tradition; insubordinate; inclined to rebel.
  89. Reckless - Heedless. Headstrong. Foolhardy. Unthinking boldness, wild carelessness and disregard for consequences.
  90. Remorseless - Without remorse; merciless; pitiless; relentless.
  91. Rigorous - Rigidly accurate; allowing no deviation from a standard; demanding strict attention to rules and procedures.
  92. Sadist - The deriving of sexual gratification or the tendency to derive sexual gratification from inflicting pain or emotional abuse on others. Deriving of pleasure, or the tendency to derive pleasure, from cruelty.
  93. Sadomasochist - Both sadist and masochist combined.
  94. Sarcastic - A subtle form of mockery in which an intended meaning is conveyed obliquely.
  95. Sceptic - One who instinctively or habitually doubts, questions, or disagrees with assertions or generally accepted conclusions.
  96. Seducer - To lead others astray, as from duty, rectitude, or the like; corrupt. To attempt to lead or draw someone away, as from principles, faith, or allegiance.
  97. Selfish - Concerned chiefly or only with oneself.
  98. Self-Martyr - One who purposely makes a great show of suffering in order to arouse sympathy from others, as a form of manipulation, and always for a selfish cause or reason.
  99. Self-righteous - Piously sure of one’s own righteousness; moralistic. Exhibiting pious self-assurance. Holier-than-thou, sanctimonious.
  100. Senile - Showing a decline or deterioration of physical strength or mental functioning, esp. short-term memory and alertness, as a result of old age or disease.
  101. Shallow - Lacking depth of intellect or knowledge; concerned only with what is obvious.
  102. Smart Ass - Thinks they know it all, and in some ways they may, but they can be greatly annoying and difficult to deal with at times, especially in arguments.
  103. Soft-hearted - Having softness or tenderness of heart that can lead them into trouble; susceptible of pity or other kindly affection. They cannot resist helping someone they see in trouble, suffering or in need, and often don’t think of the repercussions or situation before doing so.
  104. Solemn - Deeply earnest, serious, and sober.
  105. Spineless - Lacking courage. Cowardly, wimp, lily-livered, gutless.
  106. Spiteful - Showing malicious ill will and a desire to hurt; motivated by spite; vindictive person who will look for occasions for resentment. Vengeful.
  107. Spoiled - Treated with excessive indulgence and pampering from earliest childhood, and has no notion of hard work, self-care or money management; coddled, pampered. Having the character or disposition harmed by pampering or over-solicitous attention.
  108. Squeamish - Excessively fastidious and easily disgusted.
  109. Stubborn - Unreasonably, often perversely unyielding; bull-headed. Firmly resolved or determined; resolute.
  110. Superstitious - An irrational belief arising from ignorance or fear from an irrational belief that an object, action, or circumstance not logically related to a course of events influences its outcome.
  111. Tactless - Lacking or showing a lack of what is fitting and considerate in dealing with others.
  112. Temperamental - Moody, irritable, or sensitive. Excitable, volatile, emotional.
  113. Theatrical - Having a flair for over dramatizing situations, doing things in a ‘big way’ and love to be ‘centre stage’.
  114. Timid -Tends to be shy and/or quiet, shrinking away from offering opinions or from strangers and newcomers, fearing confrontations and violence.
  115. Tongue-tied - Speechless or confused in expression, as from shyness, embarrassment, or astonishment.
  116. Troublemaker - Someone who deliberately stirs up trouble, intentionally or unintentionally.
  117. Unlucky - Marked by or causing misfortune; ill-fated. Destined for misfortune; doomed.
  118. Unpredictable - Difficult to foretell or foresee, their actions are so chaotic it’s impossible to know what they are going to do next.
  119. Untrustworthy - Not worthy of trust or belief. Backstabber.
  120. Vain - Holding or characterized by an unduly high opinion of their physical appearance. Lovers of themselves. Conceited, egotistic, narcissistic.
  121. Weak-willed - Lacking willpower, strength of will to carry out one’s decisions, wishes, or plans. Easily swayed.
  122. Withdrawn - Not friendly or Sociable. Aloof.
  123. Zealous - A fanatic.

anonymous asked:

Hello! I was wondering if it would be okay or if it would be seen as ableist for someone to learn braille if their eyesight could potentially be improved with glasses or contacts? I would like to learn, however, I don't want to be taking or using up resources when I am not the targeted audience, especially when those resources are limited in the first place.

Hello there!

As far as just learning braille goes, there is absolutely nothing wrong with it whatsoever even if you are fully sighted. Simply deciding to learn braille will absolutely not cause any harm or use up any resources. You can always get new braille textbooks and if you’re fully sighted, some even prefer to learn visually, which you can easily do online.

However, after learning when it comes to actually using braille materials for things, I can see where you could be worried. Though, I would say this is generally not a problem, either. If you are not fully sighted and do have some degree of visual impairment, absolutely DO NOT feel ashamed in the slightest! If you want to start using braille because your vision just isn’t cutting it for print or you think you could just read faster in braille or if you could benefit from it in any way, absolutely go for it! If you’re visually impaired or legally blind in any way, you are NOT EVER “too sighted” for braille, and that goes for canes and other assistive technology, too. If you think it would help you, go for it 100%!

I suppose the only time it could be a problem is if you ARE fully sighted and want to use some materials that may be in short supply, such as checking out braille books from the state library for the blind, as there is often a long waiting list for those books already, or say, if you were at a resteraunt that has only one braille menu available. In those cases, it would probably be best to either opt for the print menu or purchase a braille book online so as not to use the hard-to-obtain free services and such.

HOWEVER, if you are still fully sighted and you have any other disability or anything else that makes it harder for you to read print, again, absolutely do not hesitate to learn and read braille!! If it will help you read better, faster, more often, or anything else for whatever reason, absolutely take advantage of it! Weather you have ADHD and the braille helps you stay focused much better than the print, or you get headaches and need to read in the dark, or anything else like that, you are most definitely more than welcome and even encouraged to use the braille and help yourself any way you can.

Sorry for how long this got, but I hope it helped!

Lego-esque ‘Braille Bricks’ help blind children learn to read

A new education project, Braille Bricks, is working to increase literacy levels in youth with blindness — using one of the most beloved children’s toys of all time. Each brick, which features raised studs just like a Lego, represents one letter of the Braille alphabet. The bricks are then arranged into learning kits for students, which they can use to form words.

Character Flaws


[So I saw this earlier and I borrowed it. It’s a pretty comprehensive list? And it gave me a lot of insight, so here it is.]

CHARACTER TRAITS LIST
Minor Flaws
Major Flaws

  • Absent-minded - Preoccupied to the extent of being unaware of one’s immediate surroundings. Abstracted, daydreaming, inattentive, oblivious, forgetful.
  • Abusive - Characterized by improper infliction of physical or psychological maltreatment towards another.
  • Addict - One who is addicted to a compulsive activity. Examples: gambling, drugs, sex.
  • Aimless - Devoid of direction or purpose.
  • Alcoholic - A person who drinks alcoholic substances habitually and to excess.
  • Anxious - Full of mental distress or uneasiness because of fear of danger or misfortune; greatly worried; solicitous.
  • Arrogant - Having or displaying a sense of overbearing self-worth or self-importance. Inclined to social exclusiveness and who rebuff the advances of people considered inferior. Snobbish.
  • Audacious - Recklessly bold in defiance of convention, propriety, law, or the like; insolent; braze, disobedient.
  • Bad Habit - A revolting personal habit. Examples: picks nose, spits tobacco, drools, bad body odour.
  • Bigmouth - A loud-mouthed or gossipy person.
  • Bigot - One who is strongly partial to one’s own group, religion, race, or politics and is intolerant of those who differ.
  • Blunt - Characterized by directness in manner or speech; without subtlety or evasion. Frank, callous, insensitive, brusque.
  • Bold - In a bad sense, too forward; taking undue liberties; over assuming or confident; lacking proper modesty or restraint; rude; impudent. Abrupt, brazen, cheeky, brassy, audacious.
  • Callous - They are hardened to emotions, rarely showing any form of it in expression. Unfeeling. Cold.
  • Childish - Marked by or indicating a lack of maturity; puerile.
  • Complex - An exaggerated or obsessive concern or fear.
  • Cruel - Mean to anyone or anything, without care or regard to consequences and feelings.
  • Cursed - A person who has befallen a prayer for evil or misfortune, placed under a spell, or borne into an evil circumstance, and suffers for it. Damned.
  • Dependent - Unable to exist, sustain oneself, or act appropriately or normally without the assistance or direction of another.
  • Deranged - Mentally decayed. Insane. Crazy. Mad. Psychotic.
  • Dishonest – Given to or using fraud, cheating; deceitful, deceptive, crooked, underhanded.
  • Disloyal - Lacking loyalty. Unfaithful, perfidious, traitorous, treasonable
  • Disorder - An ailment that affects the function of mind or body. (PTSD)
  • Disturbed - Showing some or a few signs or symptoms of mental or emotional illness. Confused, disordered, neurotic, troubled.
  • Dubious - Fraught with uncertainty or doubt. Undecided, doubtful, unsure.
  • Dyslexic - Affected by dyslexia, a learning disorder marked by impairment of the ability to recognize and comprehend written words.
  • Egotistical - Characteristic of those having an inflated idea of their own importance. Boastful, pompous.
  • Envious - Showing extreme cupidity; painfully desirous of another’s advantages; covetous, jealous.
  • Erratic - Deviating from the customary course in conduct or opinion; eccentric: erratic behaviour. Eccentric, bizarre, outlandish, strange.
  • Fanatical - Fanatic outlook or behaviour especially as exhibited by excessive enthusiasm, unreasoning zeal, or wild and extravagant notions on some subject.
  • Fickle – Erratic, changeable, unstable - especially with regard to affections or attachments; capricious.
  • Fierce - Marked by extreme intensity of emotions or convictions; inclined to react violently; fervid.
  • Finicky - Excessively particular or fastidious; difficult to please; fussy. Too much concerned with detail. Meticulous, fastidious, choosy, critical, picky, prissy, persnickety.
  • Fixated - In psychoanalytic theory, a strong attachment to a person or thing, especially such an attachment formed in childhood or infancy and manifested in immature or neurotic behaviour that persists throughout life. Fetish, quirk, obsession, infatuation.
  • Flirt -To make playfully romantic or sexual overtures; behaviour intended to arouse sexual interest. Minx. Tease.
  • Gluttonous - Given to excess in consumption of especially food or drink. Voracious, ravenous, wolfish, piggish, insatiable.
  • Gruff - Brusque or stern in manner or appearance. Crusty, rough, surly.
  • Gullible - Will believe any information given, regardless of how valid or truthful it is, easily deceived or duped.
  • Hard - A person who is difficult to deal with, manage, control, overcome, or understand. Hard emotions, hard hearted.
  • Hedonistic - Pursuit of or devotion to pleasure, especially to the pleasures of the senses.
  • Hoity-toity - Given to flights of fancy; capricious; frivolous. Prone to giddy behaviour, flighty.
  • Humourless - The inability to find humour in things, and most certainly in themselves.
  • Hypocritical - One who is always contradicting their own beliefs, actions or sayings. A person who professes beliefs and opinions for others that he does not hold. Being a hypocrite.
  • Idealist - One whose conduct is influenced by ideals that often conflict with practical considerations. One who is unrealistic and impractical, guided more by ideals than by practical considerations.
  • Idiotic - Marked by a lack of intelligence or care; foolish or careless.
  • Ignorant - Lacking knowledge or information as to a particular subject or fact. Showing or arising from a lack of education or knowledge.
  • Illiterate - Unable to read and write.
  • Immature - Emotionally undeveloped; juvenile; childish.
  • Impatient - Unable to wait patiently or tolerate delay; restless. Unable to endure irritation or opposition; intolerant.
  • Impious - Lacking piety and reverence for a god/gods and their followers.
  • Impish - Naughtily or annoyingly playful.
  • Incompetent - Unable to execute tasks, no matter how the size or difficulty.
  • Indecisive - Characterized by lack of decision and firmness, especially under pressure.
  • Indifferent - The trait of lacking enthusiasm for or interest in things generally, remaining calm and seeming not to care; a casual lack of concern. Having or showing little or no interest in anything; languid; spiritless.
  • Infamy - Having an extremely bad reputation, public reproach, or strong condemnation as the result of a shameful, criminal, or outrageous act that affects how others view them.
  • Intolerant - Unwilling to tolerate difference of opinion and narrow-minded about cherished opinions.
  • Judgmental - Inclined to make and form judgements, especially moral or personal ones, based on one’s own opinions or impressions towards others/practices/groups/religions based on appearance, reputation, occupation, etc.
  • Klutz - Clumsy. Blunderer.
  • Lazy - Resistant to work or exertion; disposed to idleness.
  • Lewd - Inclined to, characterized by, or inciting to lust or lechery; lascivious. Obscene or indecent, as language or songs; salacious.
  • Liar - Compulsively and purposefully tells false truths more often than not. A person who has lied or who lies repeatedly.
  • Lustful - Driven by lust; preoccupied with or exhibiting lustful desires.
  • Masochist - The deriving of sexual gratification, or the tendency to derive sexual gratification, from being physically or emotionally abused. A willingness or tendency to subject oneself to unpleasant or trying experiences
  • Meddlesome - Intrusive in a meddling or offensive manner, given to meddling; interfering.
  • Meek - Evidencing little spirit or courage; overly submissive or compliant; humble in spirit or manner; suggesting retiring mildness or even cowed submissiveness.
  • Megalomaniac - A psycho pathological condition characterized by delusional fantasies of wealth, power, or omnipotence.
  • Naïve - Lacking worldly experience and understanding, simple and guileless; showing or characterized by a lack of sophistication and critical judgement. ( Kind of)
  • Nervous - Easily agitated or distressed; high-strung or jumpy.
  • Non-violent - Abstaining from the use of violence.
  • Nosey - Given to prying into the affairs of others; snoopy. Offensively curious or inquisitive.
  • Obsessive - An unhealthy and compulsive preoccupation with something or someone.
  • Oppressor - A person of authority who subjects others to undue pressures, to keep down by severe and unjust use of force or authority.
  • Overambitious - Having a strong excessive desire for success or achievement.
  • Overconfident - Excessively confident; presumptuous.
  • Overemotional - Excessively or abnormally emotional. Sensitive about themselves and others, more so than the average person.
  • Overprotective - To protect too much; coddle.
  • Overzealous - Marked by excessive enthusiasm for and intense devotion to a cause or idea.
  • Pacifist - Opposition to war or violence as a means of resolving disputes.
  • Paranoid - Exhibiting or characterized by extreme and irrational fear or distrust of others.
  • Peevish - Expressing fretfulness and discontent, or unjustifiable dissatisfaction. Cantankerous, cross, ill-tempered, testy, captious, discontented, crotchety, cranky, ornery.
  • Perfectionist - A propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards.
  • Pessimist - A tendency to stress the negative or unfavourable or to take the gloomiest possible view.
  • Pest - One that pesters or annoys, with or without realizing it. Nuisance. Annoying. Nag.
  • Phobic – They have a severe form of fear when it comes to this one thing.
  • Practical - Level-headed, efficient, and unspeculative. No-nonsense.
  • Predictable - Easily seen through and assessable, where almost anyone can predict reactions and actions of said person by having met or known them even for a short time.
  • Proud - Filled with or showing excessive self-esteem and will often shirk help from others for the sake of pride.
  • Rebellious - Defying or resisting some established authority, government, or tradition; insubordinate; inclined to rebel.
  • Reckless - Heedless. Headstrong. Foolhardy. Unthinking boldness, wild carelessness and disregard for consequences.
  • Remorseless - Without remorse; merciless; pitiless; relentless.
  • Rigorous - Rigidly accurate; allowing no deviation from a standard; demanding strict attention to rules and procedures.
  • Sadist - The deriving of sexual gratification or the tendency to derive sexual gratification from inflicting pain or emotional abuse on others. Deriving of pleasure, or the tendency to derive pleasure, from cruelty.
  • Sadomasochist - Both sadist and masochist combined.
  • Sarcastic - A subtle form of mockery in which an intended meaning is conveyed obliquely.
  • Skeptic - One who instinctively or habitually doubts, questions, or disagrees with assertions or generally accepted conclusions.
  • Seducer - To lead others astray, as from duty, rectitude, or the like; corrupt. To attempt to lead or draw someone away, as from principles, faith, or allegiance.
  • Selfish - Concerned chiefly or only with oneself.
  • Self-Martyr - One who purposely makes a great show of suffering in order to arouse sympathy from others, as a form of manipulation, and always for a selfish cause or reason.
  • Self-righteous - Piously sure of one’s own righteousness; moralistic. Exhibiting pious self-assurance. Holier-than-thou, sanctimonious.
  • Senile - Showing a decline or deterioration of physical strength or mental functioning, esp. short-term memory and alertness, as a result of old age or disease.
  • Shallow - Lacking depth of intellect or knowledge; concerned only with what is obvious.
  • Smart Ass - Thinks they know it all, and in some ways they may, but they can be greatly annoying and difficult to deal with at times, especially in arguments.
  • Soft-hearted - Having softness or tenderness of heart that can lead them into trouble; susceptible of pity or other kindly affection. They cannot resist helping someone they see in trouble, suffering or in need, and often don’t think of the repercussions or situation before doing so.
  • Solemn - Deeply earnest, serious, and sober.
  • Spineless - Lacking courage. Cowardly, wimp, lily-livered, gutless.
  • Spiteful - Showing malicious ill will and a desire to hurt; motivated by spite; vindictive person who will look for occasions for resentment. Vengeful.
  • Spoiled - Treated with excessive indulgence and pampering from earliest childhood, and has no notion of hard work, self-care or money management; coddled, pampered. Having the character or disposition harmed by pampering or over-solicitous attention.
  • Squeamish - Excessively fastidious and easily disgusted.
  • Stubborn - Unreasonably, often perversely unyielding; bull-headed. Firmly resolved or determined; resolute.
  • Superstitious - An irrational belief arising from ignorance or fear from an irrational belief that an object, action, or circumstance not logically related to a course of events influences its outcome.
  • Tactless - Lacking or showing a lack of what is fitting and considerate in dealing with others.
  • Temperamental - Moody, irritable, or sensitive. Excitable, volatile, emotional.
  • Theatrical - Having a flair for over dramatizing situations, doing things in a ‘big way’ and love to be ‘centre stage’.
  • Timid -Tends to be shy and/or quiet, shrinking away from offering opinions or from strangers and newcomers, fearing confrontations and violence.
  • Tongue-tied - Speechless or confused in expression, as from shyness, embarrassment, or astonishment.
  • Troublemaker - Someone who deliberately stirs up trouble, intentionally or unintentionally.
  • Unlucky - Marked by or causing misfortune; ill-fated. Destined for misfortune; doomed. Parker Luck.
  • Unpredictable - Difficult to foretell or foresee, their actions are so chaotic it’s impossible to know what they are going to do next.
  • Untrustworthy - Not worthy of trust or belief. Backstabber.
  • Vain - Holding or characterized by an unduly high opinion of their physical appearance. Lovers of themselves. Conceited, egotistic, narcissistic.
  • Weak-willed - Lacking willpower, strength of will to carry out one’s decisions, wishes, or plans. Easily swayed.
  • Withdrawn - Not friendly or Sociable. Aloof.
  • Zealous - A fanatic.

    [Tagging @ladymerewif, @hella-flawless-amythyst if they wanted this for any OCs of theirs ^^]

Thrifted this little gem. Maybe useful if I meet someone both Korean and deaf. Korean sign language is a bit different than ASL. Besides having signs for specifics like 오빠 언니 형 and 누나 the signs are different. Culturally giving the finger isn’t going to go over well in America.

미안합니다! I totally didn’t realize I cut off some of the picture I am about to post another. ^^;;; 잘못해서
Preparing for the SAT

Hello all! So I just got a bunch of asks? About my SAT prep? So here are my suggestions for getting your best score.

1. Practice (I)

If you haven’t taken the PSAT, do so immediately. Take an AP Test, an SAT subject test, the ACT. Take any standardized test you can, even if it’s not necessarily helpful to you in the long run. For example, even if you aren’t particularly good at or interested in math, try out the AMC (American Mathematics Competition). If you’re at all like me, the last standardized test you took was some kind of English or math field exam in eighth grade, or even earlier. The SAT and tests like it are an entirely different playing field. Especially if you have a fee waiver, take every test available to you. One of the worst mistakes you could possibly make is to go into the SAT blind. Even if you aren’t concerned about your score, it’s important to get used to the testing environment that comes with the SAT. It’s long, it’s tedious, and the timing is simply arduous. So practice. Ideally, the hardest part of the test will be the actual material, not the cursive statement.

2. Practice (II)

So you’re good at writing, reading, and math. You’re going to do fine. Excellent! Now take a prep course. The one through my high school was $120, but fee waivers are usually available. Although I didn’t feel as though I learned new material in the class, I would highly recommend this and similar courses. They’re guided by teachers who are experts on the SAT, and offer full, properly graded practice exams. I cannot stress enough how much this helped! This ties in with number one in that you become very comfortable with the types of questions asked, formatting, and the atmosphere in general, as well as receiving one-on-one help from people who seriously know what they’re talking about to address your specific struggles.

3. Practice (III)

If you can’t afford or can’t attend a prep course, don’t panic. With a little ingenuity, you can simulate your own. Print out some practice tests, split them into sections, time yourself, and track your improvement. Based on the class I took, my suggestion would be to start by doing one or two sections (25 mins) at a time, and work your way up towards the full exam length. For your essay, limit yourself to two sheets of paper, and ask an English teacher at your school to help you asses it. There is no need to take a fancy class if you’re willing to do the work on your own, but also know that prepping for the SAT independently will take a lot of effort if you plan to cover all of the material. For me, a class worked very well, but this may not be the case for you! 

  • Note: In regards to review books sold by Baron’s, Pearson, and the College Board, my experience has been that it is not in your best interest to buy them!!!!! They can be very expensive, and many times, don’t offer exclusive material. Practice tests and old exams can be found online, essay guidelines and rubrics are available to the general public. That said, the test taking strategies and question type analysis can be very helpful, especially if you are prepping without a course, so while I wouldn’t buy them, definitely make use of ones available in libraries or through a resource office at your school. 
  • Note: In regards to those aforementioned books, edition rarely matters because the test is uniform. UNLESS.You are taking the exam after it has been reworked. Information about the new SAT is on the College Board website, and in the specific case that you are taking the test soon after it’s been revised, I would suggest buying a review book directly from the College Board; this will be the best and possibly the only source of information on the new test.

4. Practice (IV): Don’t Cry

I am one of the last people to say that your grades don’t matter. They absolutely do, and so do your SAT scores, so I won’t say that the SAT doesn’t matter, either. However, it is important to know that you have a lot of options. For those who might not be so strong in pure math and prefer reasoned thinking or physical stuff, the ACT +Writing is a great option. I felt that the ACT was overall more laid back than the SAT, and that although it shared many of the tricky standardized testing aspects of the SAT, it focused more on common sense than the bizarre material sometimes found on the SAT. Also, SAT Subject Tests allow you to choose your best subject and take a standardized test in that. This takes guess work out of the possible tested material, and often allows you a quieter, less stressful setting (You may be the only one taking the test, and will be given your own room.). This showcases your abilities in a way you can be confident in. Don’t let anyone deter you from taking a subject test because it is “too difficult” or “unnecessary”; for many, this a great way to show your stuff in a way that’s more customized and often just as impressive. 

Do I Take it Again?

To start with, before you take the test, ask what score you will be satisfied with, and what score you want. Then, when you get you’re scores back, see where they fall. Did you meet your goal? Did you get the score you wanted? Most importantly, do you think you can do better? Something awfully neat that I never knew about: super-scoring. What this means is that colleges and other institutions take your highest score for each individual section, and then combine those for you total rather that using one test or another. What that means is that if you get a good writing score, you don’t need to be worried that you’ll lose it if you take the test again to raise your math score. This can also be really useful to anyone with test anxiety; try your best each time, but focus on only one or two sections when you sit for the test, and then on the other section(s) when you take it again. You. Have. Options. The SAT difficult because it involves such a strict environment for your performance, but there are things you can do to make sure you’re in your element on test day. 

Speaking of Which

Use. Your. Resources. If you have any learning impairment whatsoever, even if it doesn’t seem relevant to the test, report it to the College Board and ask for accommodation. You can get extra time for a hearing disability, even though there isn’t an auditory portion on the SAT. Get a concussion test week? Call your doctor, get a note, and then call the test center to make sure that you are being given every advantage available to you. Do not “tough it out” or get nervous that you’re “high maintenance”; this test is important and you deserve to be assisted in any way you see fit. This cannot hurt you. Do it.

But How Do You Study

Math: The timing is the killer here. So, this is not the time to break out your implicit differentiation. Look up geometry an algebra tricks, so you know the most efficient way to tackle each problem. Work backwards when you hit the free response. Often, the multiple choice questions are no easier to solve, but they are easier to guess, and that’s by a good margin, so spend time on other questions first. Finally, bring your calculator. They aren’t necessary, but they sure are useful. you don’t want to waste your precious time working out long division when you’ve got a perimeter to calculate, so save the arithmetic for TI. If you’re most comfortable using a calculator that you don’t own, like that schnazzy new TInspire, ask to borrow one from school. 

Critical Reading: Once again time is of the essence. You’re goal needs to be, “Tell me, quickly, what’s the story?”. However, there are a few parts that you should never skip. The intor in italics tells you very important information about the reading, and what you read may not make sense without it. Even if the questions reference specific lines, try the skim the entire piece at least once so you have all the context you need. The vocabulary questions might be the hardest part of the entire test, because you really can’t prepare for them at all. However, some tricks still apply. Elimination is key here, as is actually saying the word out loud. Okay. Don’t actually say the word aloud, that will definitely get your score cancelled. However, mouth it, maybe even whisper, say it in your head, so that you get a feel for the word. Onomatopoeia is a real thing that can help you here, so do not disregard it. Go with your instincts if you’ve never seen a word before. The grammar questions follow seven or so specific rules like tense error, subject verb agreement, idioms, etc. Identifying what the question is focusing on makes it a million times easier to figure out where the errors lie, so looking at what comes up on every test can give you a fantastic arsenal of classification. You cannot lose. 

WritingPlan your essay. You should take a stance on the statement that is provided to you, either agreeing or disagreeing, and you should then use two separate examples to support your stance, each of which is a paragraph. Add and introduction and conclusion and you are out of time; this is another one that you’ll want to practice with a timer and restricted space (you get two pages). By examples, I mean literally anything. Know a statistic? Use it. Remember that book you read? Reference it. Do you understand the role of the Federal Reserve Bank in the US economy? Talk about it. You can use historical facts, trivia, even a personal experience. The most important part of your essay is not the grammar or the quality of your writing, it’s not even the subject. What is most important here is that you are clear about whether or not you agree with the statement provided. Pound it out. Decide right away what you’re going to say and stick with it. Be confident. 

So, obviously, this is what I did. And for me, it worked. Something important to remember here is that school has always come easy to me, and that’s just how it is for some people. You have the ability to do as well as you want to, but you also have to asses the amount of effort you are willing to put in and if it’s worth the points. Something I would highly suggest is literally writing down a range of scores and the corresponding hours of work it would take for you to earn that score. Your mental, emotional, and physical health are not worth however many points you think you need to do well. Do what feels right to you, and remember that you have options! 

So,  yeah. This is the longest post I have ever made, and if I didn’t answer someone’s question or you have new ones, please ask, anonymous or not! Happy testing!

anonymous asked:

I love your stamp idea! I just had a quick question. What would 'qualify' as a stamp? Like would depression or anxiety disorders have their own stamp?

Pretty much any divergency would count for a stamp. Anxiety and depression, autism, personality disorders, learning impairments, anything that isn’t ‘neurotypical’.

Concrete

Ok I get why people are upset about her design 100% but the can’t read thing bothers me. People of color can have dyslexia as well I actually have met some. Depending on the severity of it, it can entirely affect how you can read and if you can read at all. Also illiteracy comes in people with all shapes, sizes, and colors. I just saying as someone with learning impairment I know that they affect anyone and how do we know the gems can’t have dsylexia or something like it. I am happy she was not in the show just wanted my statement out as someone who for a long time struggled to read and went to a summer school to help with it.

anonymous asked:

I don't understand how you can be blind? How do you workout and stuff and run your blog? You seem to do a lot for a blind person.

Thanks, I guess!

One of the most common misconceptions about blind people is that they all see darkness. The reality is that one in ten blind people sees darkness while the other nine have vision that ranges on a spectrum of varying degrees of peripheral / central vision, neurological and degenerative disorders and more. I’ve been told by my specialist that my corrected vision with congenital nystagmus and myopia is 10% of normative vision; but that figure doesn’t mean anything to me because I’ve never known normative vision for comparison’s sake.

When it comes to recognizing people, places and things, I rely heavily upon size, height, shapes, colours, lines, motion in space, gait and other descriptive identifiers. Because I’m not very good at facial recognition from distances greater than maybe 5 feet, all of the people I know are pretty much logged in my memory according to these descriptors. But if you were to suddenly change your hairstyle or grow a beard, be prepared for me not recognizing who you are. My former roommate had a bearded friend who would come over to the house from time to time. One day, this friend showed up at the door clean shaven. I answered with “Hi, can I help you?” The one thing I relied upon for recognizing him was gone. Most blind people would be able to resolve this problem by resorting to their sense of hearing; but I can’t always rely on my hearing because I’m also deaf in one ear.

Navigating spaces is typically a practice in geometry and memory. Colours, shapes, textures, lights, they’re all things I use to locate myself in space. One thing I love about where I train right now is that its equipment is brightly coloured, including the plates. With that, I’m able to locate things even from far away. But god help you, if you move something in the gym without telling me, I may be overly upset about it because you’ve disrupted my routine, the cartography of my memory, and my day! Haha!

I function on enlarged print. Adaptive technologies have developed well over the years, making things more accessible for the blind. I fell in love with Apple because of its screen magnifier. It makes computer use more seamless and intuitive than any other adaptive technology I’ve used. There are some other technologies that I own but tend not to use, mostly because it’s been ingrained in me from birth that it’s important to see or at least pretend that I can in order to avoid being an inconvenience or perceived as weak. “Outing” myself by being seen using adaptive technology is something I’ve anxiously avoided my whole life. It’s taken a toll on my mental health but I’ve come to learn recently that my experience mirrors that of nearly every visually impaired person. Learning to accept my limitations is a process that really only just began for me.

My parents never had me learn braille which can be attributed to the fact that in the 80s most people didn’t know what to do with someone who fell within the spectrum of visually impaired. They probably didn’t want to have me associated with disability via braille because I did have some vision (albeit extremely low) and a sharp enough mind at an early age to take inventory of descriptive identifiers in my surroundings and “pass” as sighted. Not learning braille is something I regret because I would have been able to read many times faster than with print without eyestrain. Very few people successfully learn to read braille as adults because an adult’s sense of touch is not as electrically sensitive as a child’s.

A lot of people operate under the misconception that blindness is complete darkness. Since I do not see darkness, I’m forced to conform to the sighted world. My ability to “pass” with  acquired mobility skills has resulted in me being put in some difficult situations of not being taken seriously for my needs or being accused of pretending to be visually impaired (dumb, I know). The white ID cane helps a lot in situations like that. Before associating me with blindness, most people who know me would instead describe me as “a little clumsy,” “aloof,” “eccentric” and “meditatively focused” when the situation is, “no I didn’t see you waving at me from 10 feet away that other night at the bar.”

Ok. Life story over. I hope that in some roundabout way, I’ve answered your question.

My work will never better because I’m permanently stuck using microsoft paint to sprite because I’m too fucking learning impaired to understand anything else like aesprite.

I sort of get the program, but it’s more for people who can actually sprite. 

Synesthesia Tsukki
  • Baby Tsukki doesn’t speak until he can already do full sentences, and the first things he talks about are colors, when his mother sings him a lullaby in bed. 
  • He talks about cold blues that go to black, trying to find the words to explain stars in space, holding his hands out towards the dark ceiling above him. 
  • Preschool Tsukki standing alone in the playground at recess, hands over his ears because everything’s so bright it’s blinding. 
  • Second grade Tsukki spending his days after school in the music room, touching instruments with tiny fingers, listening to the little sparks of color they make him see. 
  • Fourth grade Tsukki being given headphones by his older brother. “Just don’t hide behind them forever, alright, Kei?”
  • Fifth grade Tsukki learning about sign language, spending his afternoons at the deafness and hearing impaired center, learning to speak with silence. 
  • Sixth grade Tsukki, taller than the other kids, smarter than the other kids, estranged because of the way he gets when it’s too loud. Disliked because he cuts himself away from the world with headphones. 
  • Seventh grade Tsukki with his first real friend, a boy who talks too loud all the time and simply won’t leave him alone. But his colors are…warm. A different side of space, with those freckles and that sunny smile. 
  • Tenth grade Tsukki joining Karasuno. Fifteen year old Tsukki feeling for once like he belongs somewhere. 
  • Hinata signing with him about things from across the court, teaching Kageyama how to sign for passes, teaching the entire team how to do it.
  • Yachi talking to him about art. About painting and designs and colors, about putting the things he sees onto paper, because maybe that way they’ll understand him a little better, too.
  • Eleventh grade Tsukki receiving a small expensive paintset from the team for his birthday, something they pooled all their money for together to get for him. 
  • Twelfth grade Vice Captain Tsukishima, lead blocker of the Karasuno champion school. 
  • Vice Captain Tsukishima, who somehow knows what his teammates are thinking without them saying it, seeing it in the color of their voices and the words they choose. 
  • Captain Yamaguchi, who pulls the players up, guides them and encourages them, but Vice Captain Tsukishima, who knows how to push them. Which words to use and what to say. 
  • Vice Captain Tsukishima, who doesn’t say a word on the court, but sometimes he makes some quick, fleeting motion with his hands and the team just responds, in perfect, coordinated harmony, like he’s the conductor of a symphony. 

So I wore this dress to school today, and almost all my teachers talk to me about it, luckily, I didn’t get in trouble. As you can see it’s open at the top, showing my upper chest. I brought a denim jacket with me, but I couldn’t wear it in 80F weather.

I wanted to talk to you guys about one of my teachers in particular. I was sitting in class reading, not wearing the jacket. She publicly called me out on it and said, “it’s distracting for the boys if you wear that. You’re impairing their learning.” I just kinda sat there, feeling my face get hot because of the publicity of the comment. After a little while, I still didn’t have my jacket on. She asked me again to put it on. I then asked why. She answered with the same thing. I then proceeded to stand up and say, “Then stop acting like it’s okay for boys to look, It’s 80 degrees, I’m not wearing that jacket.” The rest of the class was silent, then a couple girls, and some boys started clapping.

I thought I’d share that with you, because no one else will listen to me.

So in preparation for MAD MAX: FURY ROAD, I decided to finally watch BEYOND THUNDERDOME since it was the only MAD MAX film I still hadn’t seen.

Real talk - how is Auntie not the hero of BEYOND THUNDERDOME?

She built a thriving city out of nothing and instilled a harsh-but-fair legal system all by herself.  Then Master, the dude who runs her town’s energy systems (as well as forces a mentally challenged giant named Blaster to protect him and attack others) keeps turning the power off as a means of bullying/controlling her.  When Auntie eventually hires Max to kill Blaster, thus removing the only ally Master has, he refuses to at the last second when he learns of Blaster’s impaired cognitive function, but then tries to save and protect the man who’d been abusing Blaster for years!  And then Auntie lets them both live at the end!

I mean, look at her:

In what universe is she not the hero?

on the topic of accessibility in the rpc: more rps need to regulate how they let members format their posts. using sub and writing a text without capitalization, punctualization, &or proper structure (aka structuring it like a poem) makes posts inaccessible to people with learning disabilities or sight impairments. in group rps it’s important to have clean, readable posts bc the concept of the rp is that everyone interacts and writes with each other, and I don’t think it’s a stretch at all to request that accessibility should trump aesthetic in that setting.

2

Some story-centric art focusing on feral child!N.
First picture presumably taken after they’ve cleaned him up a little and managed to wrestle him into a pair of shorts (Ghetsis demanded pants but shorts were the only thing they could compromise on). He bit anyone trying to touch his hair, so they just left it as it is.
It takes him a while to grow out of walking on all fours.

He does gradually grow fond of his new ‘family’ though, even if they keep an annoying amount of things which aren’t halfway edible around like Rubik’s cubes (Rhames tries to explain that just because it’s coloured like food doesn’t mean it is, child.)

He was probably abandoned as a toddler and they found him when he was five years of age (there was a rumour going around a village near Nacrene city about a 'prince of the woods’ who was running around with some Darmanitan) which is good since he didn’t spend a long enough time with animals to severely impair his learning capabilities.