learn the difference kids

Rick Riordan won a Stonewall award today

for his second Magnus Chase book, due to the inclusion of the character Alex Fierro who is gender fluid. This was the speech he gave, and it really distills why I love this author and his works so much, and why I will always recommend his works to anyone and everyone.

“Thank you for inviting me here today. As I told the Stonewall Award Committee, this is an honor both humbling and unexpected.

So, what is an old cis straight white male doing up here? Where did I get the nerve to write Alex Fierro, a transgender, gender fluid child of Loki in The Hammer of Thor, and why should I get cookies for that?

These are all fair and valid questions, which I have been asking myself a lot.

I think, to support young LGBTQ readers, the most important thing publishing can do is to publish and promote more stories by LGBTQ authors, authentic experiences by authentic voices. We have to keep pushing for this. The Stonewall committee’s work is a critical part of that effort. I can only accept the Stonewall Award in the sense that I accept a call to action – firstly, to do more myself to read and promote books by LGBTQ authors.

But also, it’s a call to do better in my own writing. As one of my genderqueer readers told me recently, “Hey, thanks for Alex. You didn’t do a terrible job!” I thought: Yes! Not doing a terrible job was my goal!

As important as it is to offer authentic voices and empower authors and role models from within LGBTQ community, it’s is also important that LGBTQ kids see themselves reflected and valued in the larger world of mass media, including my books. I know this because my non-heteronormative readers tell me so. They actively lobby to see characters like themselves in my books. They like the universe I’ve created. They want to be part of it. They deserve that opportunity. It’s important that I, as a mainstream author, say, “I see you. You matter. Your life experience may not be like mine, but it is no less valid and no less real. I will do whatever I can to understand and accurately include you in my stories, in my world. I will not erase you.”

People all over the political spectrum often ask me, “Why can’t you just stay silent on these issues? Just don’t include LGBTQ material and everybody will be happy.” This assumes that silence is the natural neutral position. But silence is not neutral. It’s an active choice. Silence is great when you are listening. Silence is not so great when you are using it to ignore or exclude.

But that’s all macro, ‘big picture’ stuff. Yes, I think the principles are important. Yes, in the abstract, I feel an obligation to write the world as I see it: beautiful because of its variations. Where I can’t draw on personal experience, I listen, I read a lot – in particular I want to credit Beyond Magenta and Gender Outlaws for helping me understand more about the perspective of my character Alex Fierro – and I trust that much of the human experience is universal. You can’t go too far wrong if you use empathy as your lens. But the reason I wrote Alex Fierro, or Nico di Angelo, or any of my characters, is much more personal.

I was a teacher for many years, in public and private school, California and Texas. During those years, I taught all kinds of kids. I want them all to know that I see them. They matter. I write characters to honor my students, and to make up for what I wished I could have done for them in the classroom.

I think about my former student Adrian (a pseudonym), back in the 90s in San Francisco. Adrian used the pronouns he and him, so I will call him that, but I suspect Adrian might have had more freedom and more options as to how he self-identified in school were he growing up today. His peers, his teachers, his family all understood that Adrian was female, despite his birth designation. Since kindergarten, he had self-selected to be among the girls – socially, athletically, academically. He was one of our girls. And although he got support and acceptance at the school, I don’t know that I helped him as much as I could, or that I tried to understand his needs and his journey. At that time in my life, I didn’t have the experience, the vocabulary, or frankly the emotional capacity to have that conversation. When we broke into social skills groups, for instance, boys apart from girls, he came into my group with the boys, I think because he felt it was required, but I feel like I missed the opportunity to sit with him and ask him what he wanted. And to assure him it was okay, whichever choice he made. I learned more from Adrian than I taught him. Twenty years later, Alex Fierro is for Adrian.

I think about Jane (pseudonym), another one of my students who was a straight cis-female with two fantastic moms. Again, for LGBTQ families, San Francisco was a pretty good place to live in the 90s, but as we know, prejudice has no geographical border. You cannot build a wall high enough to keep it out. I know Jane got flack about her family. I did what I could to support her, but I don’t think I did enough. I remember the day Jane’s drama class was happening in my classroom. The teacher was new – our first African American male teacher, which we were all really excited about – and this was only his third week. I was sitting at my desk, grading papers, while the teacher did a free association exercise. One of his examples was ‘fruit – gay.’ I think he did it because he thought it would be funny to middle schoolers. After the class, I asked to see the teacher one on one. I asked him to be aware of what he was saying and how that might be hurtful. I know. Me, a white guy, lecturing this Black teacher about hurtful words. He got defensive and quit, because he said he could not promise to not use that language again. At the time, I felt like I needed to do something, to stand up especially for Jane and her family. But did I make things better handling it as I did? I think I missed an opportunity to open a dialogue about how different people experience hurtful labels. Emmie and Josephine and their daughter Georgina, the family I introduce in The Dark Prophecy, are for Jane.

I think about Amy, and Mark, and Nicholas … All former students who have come out as gay since I taught them in middle school. All have gone on to have successful careers and happy families. When I taught them, I knew they were different. Their struggles were greater, their perspectives more divergent than some of my other students. I tried to provide a safe space for them, to model respect, but in retrospect I don’t think I supported them as well as I could have, or reached out as much as they might have needed. I was too busy preparing lessons on Shakespeare or adjectives, and not focusing enough on my students’ emotional health. Adjectives were a lot easier for me to reconcile than feelings. Would they have felt comfortable coming out earlier than college or high school if they had found more support in middle school? Would they have wanted to? I don’t know. But I don’t think they felt it was a safe option, which leaves me thinking that I did not do enough for them at that critical middle school time. I do not want any kid to feel alone, invisible, misunderstood. Nico di Angelo is for Amy, and Mark and Nicholas.

I am trying to do more. Percy Jackson started as a way to empower kids, in particular my son, who had learning differences. As my platform grew, I felt obliged to use it to empower all kids who are struggling through middle school for whatever reason. I don’t always do enough. I don’t always get it right. Good intentions are wonderful things, but at the end of a manuscript, the text has to stand on its own. What I meant ceases to matter. Kids just see what I wrote. But I have to keep trying. My kids are counting on me.

So thank you, above all, to my former students who taught me. Alex Fierro is for you.

To you, I pledge myself to do better – to apologize when I screw up, to learn from my mistakes, to be there for LGBTQ youth and make sure they know that in my books, they are included. They matter. I am going to stop talking now, but I promise you I won’t stop listening.”

“percy jackson started as the basic straight white boy protagonist—”

no literally fuck off as an ADHD person outside of rick riordan’s work there are, literally, five (5) ADHD characters that i know of (in captain underpants, doctor who, and lazytown) and not ONE dyslexic one and you know what i think??? society was DEFINITELY built for ADHD and dyslexic people and we TOTALLY don’t have a super fucking hard time in school because of our disorders hahaha why do you THINK percy never even got B’s???? do you know how much fucking homework i FAIL TO EVEN GET FINISHED????

literally, actively, you could not be more wrong. percy jackson is not some cishet white boy. because he is ADHD and dyslexic, you cannot claim that he is the same as, say, (canon) harry potter. you CANNOT.

literally the only reason that percy even exists is rick riordan created him expressly for his ADHD and dyslexic son to feel better about having ADHD and dyslexia. he literally said in his speech after getting a stonewall award: “Percy Jackson started as a way to empower kids, in particular my son, who had learning differences.”

yeah, it’s super fucking great that you got all this representation (as a nonbinary aroace who has literally never seen a single aroace outside of this series). but you need to STOP SAYING THAT PERCY IS NOT IN MINORITY GROUPS. because HE IS. and it’s LITERALLY THE REASON YOU EVEN HAVE ALL THIS REPRESENTATION IN THE FIRST PLACE.

  • rick riordan: *working to include LGBT+ characters in children books, educates himself on important issues and continues to add more diverse characters, starts a program to have POC tell and publish stories of different culture's mythology, fights to involve kids with learning disabilities in reading, tries his best to respect his fans and improve himself*
  • y'all: is reyna gay??
  • rick: i didn't explicitly write her to be gay, and i feel making her a lesbian after jason broke her heart would be encouraging a damaging stereotype, but you can interpret her however you want!!
  • y'all, crytyping: ohh my godd....he's sO meanie and homopphobic i ddont like it..ffuck him i h ate himm
FIDGET SPINNERS, let’s do this

“Fidget spinners are distracting.”

ok i’m autistic, adhd, sensory problems, tic disorder, i got the whole holofoil collectors pack. And i did k-12 through college without fidget spinners and let me tell you: I FIDGETTED. I WAS A FIDGETING MCFUCKER. For kids with this brain structure this can literally be the only way to get their brain under control, by giving that one problematic part of the brain a comforting repetitive task just to get it to shut the hell up. I had to fidget, just to get my brain to shut the hell up and let me focus. Kids with ADHD and similar learning disorders will fidget, spinners or no spinners, because that allows their brain to function. Fidget spinners are incredibly less distracting than the alternative. 

I flippin wish i had had a fidget spinner, and the knowledge that my fidgeting was ok and served a purpose. Because instead I fidgeted with whatever was available: knee bouncing, nail biting, tearing up paper, biting pencils, biting my hair, clearing my throat, etc. And on top of being constantly told off by teachers, and believing my inability to sit still was because i was rude, disobedient, because i was a bad kid–on top of all of that, i got to be the Weird Kid. Instead of being a kid with a fidget spinner, which wasn’t an option then, i was the kid with All The Weird Gross Unexplained Fidgets. That’s how my classmates saw me, and it was fucking awful. 

So let kids have their goddamn spinners and cubes. they aren’t fucking distracting, not half as distracting as the makeshift coping fidgets kids w/ learning disorders will have to hobble together otherwise. Give kids the tools they need. And give them a goddamn break, they fucking need it.

the signs as rules and tips for dating a hockey player
  • <p> <b><p></b> <b>aries:</b> oh my god don't (JUST DON'T)<p/><b>taurus:</b> let him take his nap<p/><b>gemini:</b> lie about the fact that you ABSOLUTELY HATE his god awful green plaid suit<p/><b>cancer:</b> i've met plenty of brunettes<p/><b>leo:</b> learn the difference between classy and cheap<p/><b>virgo:</b> you know how little kids get when they don't get their naps? that's how it's going to be<p/><b>libra:</b> no matter what, under any circumstances, do not tell him what he did wrong<p/><b>scorpio:</b> never make plans for four months down the road<p/><b>sagittarius:</b> it's called being petty and a hoe<p/><b>capricorn:</b> have a life<p/><b>aquarius:</b> this isn't high school<p/><b>pisces:</b> don't complain about him playing xbox 9 hours out of the day<p/></p><p/></p>
LATIBÆR LORE

First off, a little context. You can skip this if you want.

So Chris from GetLazy recently posted a few very interesting pictures he had taken from the design documents that were made around 2001. Some of you might have already seen this, but since I assume that not everyone here on tumblr is active on GetLazy (me neither honestly) I decided to make a post about it for everyone to see. So as the title might suggest, the documents hold quite a bit of information about LazyTown prior to the TV series. Unfortunately however, we can’t see the whole thing. He was only able to make a few blurry and shaky pictures, but, trust me, it’s still worth reading.

I also decided to make a few notes in case it’s too hard for you to see or if you’re too lazy to read it yourself or whatever. If you can catch more information than I wrote down feel free to add. I also left out information that is already common knowledge.

Sportacus/Íþróttaálfurinn

For this one, I didn’t make notes but I will quote directly from what Chris remembers reading, as it is much more informative. But I will still post the pictures.

So, as an abandoned and unnamed child, Sportacus worked in mines under a man named Mr. Kicker. Since none of the kids in the mines had names, Kicker referred to the kids by numbers.. Sportacus being number 10. There wasn’t much fun to be had under the mines, so the kids spent a lot of time learning lots of different kinds of sports. At some point during mining, number 10 accidentally found a strange crystal that shone whenever someone was being hurt, and he kept it. After years of abuse, number 10 finally decided to revolt. In secret, he built a hot air balloon powered by pedals and one day, he flew it out of the mountain, taking some kids with him. Soon after, he came back and dropped down a ladder and started rescuing other kids. He eventually rescued all of the kids from Mr. Kicker, and was even able to take Kicker’s spyglass from him before leaving the mines forever. Also, the mustache comes from rubbing his face with coaly hands.

Ziggy/Ziggie/Siggi

- “his mother is a very busy nutritionalist”
- his parents love him immensly
- but they are not very strict with what he eats
- I think it might be because his mother didn’t have candy when she was young
and doesn’t want to take it from him as well

Stephanie/Stiffanie/Solla

- forgetful and easily distracted
- which “should not be confused with stupidity”
- makes sure everyone feels included
- from a very warm and loving family
- her father is an elementary scool teacher and her mother an ornithologist
- “they are frugal but not cheap”

Stingy/Nenni
(Honestly I couldn’t find much new information here, but you can look at it yourself of course)

- demands and sues money from everyone
- “lives in the biggest, most decadent villa in LazyTown”
- “Mr. Spoilero”

Jives/Maggi

- “he may seem stupid, but”
- saves the day when Sportacus isn’t there
- “a hero who has no interest in being one”
- lives with his mother in a very narrow building
- his room is dirty and messy

Trixie/Toemy/Halla

- “She is completely uninterested in her outward appearance”
- new in town
- “her family has moved quite a lot”
- lives in a trailer
- parents work very hard so they can buy a house
- which is why she has to fend for herself most of the time
- has two older brothers
- they’re not very nice to her from what I can tell
- “her best friends are her books”

Pixel/PC/Goggi
(this text is hard to figure out I’m sorry)

- his parents own the local TV and radio shop and are also very busy
- “… monitor instead of his own mother”
- “Crying violently whenever…”
- communicates with his parents through the intercom or e-mail
- “…his inability to speak normally”

Robbie/Glanni

- “would challenge anyone who said a bad word about her” (just curious who “her” is)
- his father was a prominent politician and his mother a compulsive gambler
- has younger siblings
- went to a private school
- was very active in both the drama and chess club
- was kicked out of chess club for cheating in the championship
- not sure but I think it says that he stole his catsuit from a play in drama club, ran off with it and disappeared for years
- when he returned he has become a skilled con-artist

Officer Obtuse/Lolli

- good friends with the mayor
- they’re compared to Laurel & Hardy and their friendship dates back to high school
- which is literally the only reason he is employed as a police officer
- doesn’t have his own home but instead stays in his office in case something happens at night
- the kids call him “Officer OB” and he thinks it’s fucking disrespectful
- is the youngest of nine (!) brothers who ALL joined the “SFLC, Special Forces for the Leader of Country” except him
- he tried to join 18 times but was never accepted
- good at sports though
- caught Robbie cheating in the chess championship

The Rooster/Cock-a-little-do/Haninn

- really doesn’t like Sportacus
- silently helps Robbie but doesn’t want to make it known
- has sisters or something
- used to take pride in waking up every morning until he discovered that being lazy is much more fun
- left the farm he used to reside to find the laziest place on earth so he could be lazy in peace
- is now the laziest inhabitant of all LazyTown


Alright, sorry for the long post but I felt like this was very necessary for all of you to know!!

“Are you gonna tell Mom?”
“Of course not.”
“You won’t tell Chess I cried?”
“I promise.”

OCs doodle! Felix’s magic is coming along kind of slowly and his first attempt at teaching himself how to ride a broom ended kind of disastrously.
HE’S TRYING OKAY.

The Thing About Pre Med

I finished this startlingly fast. I wasn’t planning on posting this until tomorrow afternoon, but why not? Happy Bellarke Day!


The thing about being pre-med is that people think you know stuff. They think they can come up to you and tell you about the cough they’ve had that just won’t go away, or ask about the weird tingling sensation they get on the back of their knee and just expect you to be able to tell them exactly what’s wrong with them. And sure, you can probably tell them that the trapezius muscle is innervated by the spinal accessory nerve or that hemoglobin has a quaternary structure made up of four polypeptides that each interact with an iron atom that gives it the ability to carry oxygen through the bloodstream. But at the end of the day, you don’t know shit about medicine.

Which is why Clarke feels more than a little bit panicked when her friends start treating her like their personal doctor.

It doesn’t start out as a big thing: Monty picked up a cold after their friends had spent a late night out in the cold drinking cheap liquor in a field off campus. He had come to her a couple of days later asking about the best cold meds to buy from the CVS down the street, and Clarke had advised him to pick up the generic brand after extensive assurance that yes, they really were the same thing and to buy some kind of sports drink to replenish his electrolyte levels.

Somehow word had gotten around. Before she knew it, Raven was asking her how best to bandage the blisters on her hands from the wrenches she used for her part-time job as a mechanic, and Jasper was flashing his bare ass wanting to know what kind of rash he had and whether he needed to see a doctor (she didn’t even want to begin to relive that one).

“This is getting out of hand,” she huffs to Bellamy one after relaying the story of Harper’s weird mole-ish thing (she had no idea what it was, to be honest) she had shown to Clarke with a few days prior. She takes a long sip from the coffee she’d ordered when they arrived, watching the corners of his eyes crinkle with humor as he fiddles with the napkins on their table and struggles to subdue a grin.

“Not so easy being Dr. Clarke?”

“That’s the problem,” she groans, fingers tangling into the roots of her hair and letting out a frustrated sigh, “I’m not a doctor. I’m a sophomore. In undergrad. I know nothing.” She lets her head fall pathetically onto the table, shielding her face with her arms like a petulant child.

“Good thing you’re paying so much money for such a quality education,” he teases.

Her head snaps back up to meet his smirking gaze. “You do realize it takes eight fucking years to become a doctor, right? And even after that there’s still three to ten years of more training in residency. I’m, like, 15% of the way done. If that.”

He tears off the corner of the croissant that sits on the plate in front of her, ignoring her noises of protest, and deadpans, “You’re practically an ignoramus.”

“Exactly,” she says, ignoring his sarcastic tone. “If this were drivers’ ed and I was only 15% done, I’d still be reading the damn handbook. They wouldn’t even let me near a car. But suddenly it’s okay for me to be making life and death decisions about a person’s body?”

Bellamy scoffs. “Okay, Princess, I feel like that might be a bit melodramatic. It’s not like you know absolutely nothing. What about that time Miller told you about that earache he was having, and you told him it was an infection he should probably get checked out? You were right, and he ended up avoiding a trip to the emergency room because of it.”

“Lucky guess,” she shrugs, fingers drumming a light rhythm on the lid of her coffee cup.

“Or that time that kid had that seizure in the student union? You were the only one there who knew to turn him onto his side.”

She rolls her eyes. “Please. That’s basic stuff everyone learns when they’re kids. No different than ‘stop, drop, and roll.’”

“What the hell kind of elementary school did you go to?”

She stifles a snicker, ignoring the slight heat rising to her cheeks. It was nice to know that her best friend had faith in her, even if she didn’t. “When my mom worked all the time, the only way I could really spend time with her was to shadow her around the hospital,” she says with a shrug. “You pick up a few things. I spent my eighth birthday learning the proper technique for wrapping a sprained ankle.”

“See?” Bellamy quips, gesturing vaguely with his cup, “You already knew more than the average adult by the time you’d finished the second grade.”

She lets out a breathy laugh, one hand reaching up to tug absentmindedly at the ends of her blonde waves. “I don’t know. I just—I’m terrified of getting it wrong, you know?” She traces the letters of her name written on the coffee cup in front of her with a finger, focusing far more attentively than the task requires. “What if someone comes to me with something and I tell them that they’re fine, and it turns out to be something really bad? What if I miss it?”

“You won’t.”

She finally glances up at Bellamy. His eyes bore into hers with an intensity and confidence that makes the tension in her shoulders soften. “You don’t know that.”

“I do,” he says firmly, his hand reaching across the table to rest on the hand still mechanically tracing the black-inked ‘C’ on her cup. “You won’t miss it.”


A few weeks later, everyone piles around the tiny laptop screen in Raven’s tiny dorm room in a halfhearted attempt of a movie night.

“This,” Jasper whines, “was the worst idea ever. Raven, why didn’t you bring a TV to college like a normal person?”

“I think the better question is why did we choose to have a movie night in the one room that doesn’t have a TV?” Clarke grumbles from her spot on the floor between Harper and Bellamy, adjusting her shoulders in an attempt to find a more comfortable position against the wall behind her.

A chorus of dissent travels across the group as Monty urgently shushes them with an insistent, “Shut up, this is the best part!”

They continue like that for a while, making jokes about the ridiculous dialogue and terrible acting between someone’s complaints that they can’t see or hear the movie, all the while with Monty grumbling that they’re ‘ruining his favorite movie’ and that they ‘shouldn’t even have a movie night if no one’s going to watch.’

They’re a little over an hour in when Clarke realizes Bellamy has been notably quiet.

“Hey,” she whispers, playfully knocking her knee into his own, “you okay? You haven’t bitched about the historical inaccuracies once during this entire movie.”

“I’m fine.”

She bristles at his short tone, feeling him tense next to her as he leans his head back against the wall behind them. She waits for him to say more, but no response comes.

“You sure?”

His eyes close as she scrutinizes him. She watches his jaw tighten.

“Yeah,” he said through gritted teeth. “I’ve just had a headache all day. No big deal.”

She pats his knee apologetically and turns back to the movie. Her attention for the remainder of the night switches between the atrocity of a film on the tiny screen and making sure Bellamy is okay. He doesn’t say anything else, but she notices that his jaw is still ticking and his eyes are still closed when she checks on him.

When the movie finally ends, the group lets out a resounding sigh of relief as Raven cheers, “Thank God!” The next half hour is a blur of people gathering their respective pillows and blankets as they issue sleepy ‘goodnights’ and ‘drive safes.’ Clarke sees Bellamy say a quick goodbye to Raven and slip quietly out the door. She hurries behind him to catch up to his long strides.

“Bellamy,” she calls, speeding up her pace as he stops at the stairwell. “Are you driving home?”

He shakes his head. The previous summer, Bellamy had leased a 2-bedroom apartment just off campus to share with Octavia once she enrolled at Ark University.

“Octavia took my car to go visit Lincoln,” he tells her. “I’m just going to walk.”

She shakes her head, her stomach lilting at the idea of him walking home alone at night when he just seemed so…off.

“No, you’re not,” she insists. “My car’s right downstairs, let me drive you home.”

“I’ll be fine, Princess. It’s just a few blocks.” He turns toward the door to the stairwell, already reaching for the handle, but Clarke catches his shoulder.

“Come on. It’s really not any trouble,” she assures him. “Please?” She senses the hesitation in his stance. His already sluggish movements slow even further. She can feel him caving as she presses, “For my own peace of mind.”

He turns to her with a resigned grimace.

“Fine,” he says, rubbing his tired eyes, “but only because you said please.”

She gives him a small grin, her hand unthinkingly grazing his broad shoulders to guide him toward the door. She trails behind him down the stairs, watching him rub gingerly where his neck tapers down to his shoulders. He tilts his head slightly to the side, allowing her to see the wince that flits across his face.

“That hurt?”

“Don’t worry about it,” he says.

“That’s a yes.”

He lets out a tired chuckle. He holds the door for her as they exit the stairwell, and again as they reach the main entrance of Raven’s building. Clarke is silently thankful the parking lot outside of her own building a block away had been full when she had returned to campus earlier that day, forcing her to park just out front of the dorm she and Bellamy were leaving. Though she knows he’s doing his best to hide his discomfort, she can see the stiff way he carries himself, looking as though he’s trying to minimize as much movement as possible.

“Seriously, are you okay?” she asks when she sees his grimace as he ducks to slide into her passengers’ seat. She doesn’t miss the lilt of concern in her voice, and judging by way he turns to her with reassurance in his eyes, Bellamy doesn’t either.

“Clarke, really,” he says, “I’m fine. I think I just hurt my neck at the gym earlier today. No big deal.” The smile her gives her seems a little forced, but lets it slide, ignoring the vague anxiety at the back of her mind.

“You should ice that when you get home,” she advises. “Take some ibuprofen, too, it’ll help if there’s inflammation. And no gym tomorrow, okay?”

“Whatever you say, Dr. Clarke.”

She lets out an exasperated sigh as she pulls out of the parking lot, a smile creeping onto her face in spite of herself. She’s relieved he’s feeling well enough to tease her, even if he still doesn’t seem quite right.

“Looks like rain,” he notes, his drowsy eyes examining the sky. “Hope Octavia doesn’t stay out too late. She doesn’t need to be driving home in a storm.”

“She could always stay over at Lincoln’s.”

Clarke is fairly certain that Bellamy’s gaze would have snapped to hers had his neck not been causing him so much pain. Even still, she saw him side-eyeing her with more than a little distaste.

“That’s not funny.”

“Oh come on,” she says with a snort, “it’s a little funny.”

They fall into a companionable silence for the rest of the drive, Clarke keeping her eyes on the quickly darkening sky while Bellamy can’t seem to keep his eyes open. Though only a few minutes have passed by the time she pulls into the parking lot outside of his building, she has to call his name twice before he finally jolts awake.

“Sorry,” he says gruffly, already reaching for the seatbelt buckle. He stiffly exits the car, poking his head around the car door before shutting it. “Make sure you get back before the rain hits.”

“I will,” she assures him. “I’ll let you know I made it back okay.”

He nods, cringing at the jolt that comes along with it. He shuts the car door, turning to the staircase that leads to his floor.

Before his foot can reach the first step, Clarke rolls down her window and calls, “Hey. You’re sure you’re okay?”

He turns back to her with a weary smile that doesn’t quite reach his eyes.

“I’m fine, Clarke. Scout’s honor.”

“You weren’t a Scout,” she points out, her voice dripping with sarcasm. She locks eyes with his, her tone becoming more serious. “Promise you’ll call if you need anything? Ice pack, a cheeseburger run, whatever.”

“I promise,” he says, his expression softening.

She gives a curt nod, offering a quick goodnight as she rolls up her window. As she pulls out of the parking lot, she does her best to silence the nagging voice in the back of her mind telling her that something isn’t right.

 Read the rest on AO3

anonymous asked:

I really love ur blog &u mean a lot to me &I was looking through some &saw one of those "ur grades don't define u" &seeing those is always a little nice &extremely terrifying bc I'm v proud of my grades, I probably define too much of my worth by them, &I just see so many "ur grades don't define u" posts so would u ever consider making a flip side of that, a "ur grades don't define u but u're allowed to take comfort in them"? Or maybe u feel like that's encouraging an unhealthy mindset?

Hi!
Thanks for reaching out to me and i’m glad you like my blog. The intent of the “Your grades do not define you" post is less about the actual grades themselves, and more about questioning the current educational system we have in place. The way it discourages legitimate learning and promotes manufactured education (e.g. classes of 200-300 different kids in a lecture hall being told to learn the exact same way and if they don’t digest information identically to the average student, they are told they are not smart).
I understand there are a lot of kids in the world and giving everyone the same education helps rate students with less variable change and some level of imperfect learning is better than no learning at all, however, I have serious qualms with the morality and effectiveness of the current education system. With that being said, rejoice and celebrate your hard work, because you earned grades you have and good grades feel good, but be mindful that the pursuit of a letter on a report card doesn’t take away from your ability to learn.
xoxo,
Cwote

can we just take a moment to consider what Jasper had to go through trying to catch all of those corrupted gems like

  • a corrupted gem runs into a supermarket trying to escape from her. Long story short, several thousand dollars in property damage ensured
  • Jasper trying to construct some sort of trap in order to catch the gems. Lots of trial and error
  • corrupted gems escaping from their cages
  • the first time Jasper sees a corrupted gem and she’s just “what the actual Fuck is that”
  • Jasper trying to tell the difference between an earth animal and a corrupted gem. Accidentally captures a bear
  • consider Jasper wrestling the bear
  • the zoo is filled with free “corrupted gems”
  • Jasper evades the police for stealing zoo animals
  • some of the petting zoo ducks imprint on her
  • Just fucking imagine what she had to go through to catch the one from Kindergarten Kid. Imagine it.
  • Jasper learns there is a big difference between what humans think a kindergarten is, and what gems think a kindergarten is
  • no Jasper do not headbutt the goats
SLBP KAI REINCARNATIONS (with a Yukimura x MC pairing)

Shingen & Kansuke

  • Shingen remembers first. He’s in the military, and there’s a moment, when he’s leading his men (and women!) that he just knows. It’s as natural and comfortable as putting on a favorite piece of clothing – the transition between not remembering and carrying all of the memories is effortless.
  • (Not without some pain over things left undone and promises unkept, but, effortless)
  • First thing he does is start seeking out the others. Kai was always, ever Kai because of the people who were a part of it, and Shingen was who he was because of the people who surrounded him, he has as much a duty to them in this life as the last.
  • Kansuke is next! Medical researcher, life has always felt a bit…lacking, like he moves through a fog.
  • Fog finally, finally lifts when Shingen walks into his lab, grinning.
  • Mr Emotionless DEFINITELY CRIES bet me on this
  • Anyway, Shingen finishes his service and starts a business, because there are new ways to lead, and this offers him a better opportunity to get out and about and find everyone.

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An “Out-of-the-Ordinary” Family // A Phan One-Shot

Genre: angst, domestic fluff, family fluff

Words: 5.2k

Relationship Status: Married

Warnings: swearing, homophobic attitudes, gender roles

Summary: Isabella Lester, Dan and Phil’s youngest child, normally loves her psychology class. But one lecture where her teacher uses Izzy’s “out-of-the-ordinary” family as an example changes all of that. Dan and Phil must help their daughter in some way.

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Thank you for inviting me here today. As I told the Stonewall Award Committee, this is an honor both humbling and unexpected.

So, what is an old cis straight white male doing up here? Where did I get the nerve to write Alex Fierro, a transgender, gender fluid child of Loki in The Hammer of Thor, and why should I get cookies for that?

These are all fair and valid questions, which I have been asking myself a lot.

I think, to support young LGBTQ readers, the most important thing publishing can do is to publish and promote more stories by LGBTQ authors, authentic experiences by authentic voices. We have to keep pushing for this. The Stonewall committee’s work is a critical part of that effort. I can only accept the Stonewall Award in the sense that I accept a call to action – firstly, to do more myself to read and promote books by LGBTQ authors.

But also, it’s a call to do better in my own writing. As one of my genderqueer readers told me recently, “Hey, thanks for Alex. You didn’t do a terrible job!” I thought: Yes! Not doing a terrible job was my goal!

As important as it is to offer authentic voices and empower authors and role models from within LGBTQ community, it’s is also important that LGBTQ kids see themselves reflected and valued in the larger world of mass media, including my books. I know this because my non-heteronormative readers tell me so. They actively lobby to see characters like themselves in my books. They like the universe I’ve created. They want to be part of it. They deserve that opportunity. It’s important that I, as a mainstream author, say, “I see you. You matter. Your life experience may not be like mine, but it is no less valid and no less real. I will do whatever I can to understand and accurately include you in my stories, in my world. I will not erase you.”

People all over the political spectrum often ask me, “Why can’t you just stay silent on these issues? Just don’t include LGBTQ material and everybody will be happy.” This assumes that silence is the natural neutral position. But silence is not neutral. It’s an active choice. Silence is great when you are listening. Silence is not so great when you are using it to ignore or exclude.

But that’s all macro, ‘big picture’ stuff. Yes, I think the principles are important. Yes, in the abstract, I feel an obligation to write the world as I see it: beautiful because of its variations. Where I can’t draw on personal experience, I listen, I read a lot – in particular I want to credit Beyond Magenta and Gender Outlaws for helping me understand more about the perspective of my character Alex Fierro – and I trust that much of the human experience is universal. You can’t go too far wrong if you use empathy as your lens. But the reason I wrote Alex Fierro, or Nico di Angelo, or any of my characters, is much more personal.

I was a teacher for many years, in public and private school, California and Texas. During those years, I taught all kinds of kids. I want them all to know that I see them. They matter. I write characters to honor my students, and to make up for what I wished I could have done for them in the classroom.

I think about my former student Adrian (a pseudonym), back in the 90s in San Francisco. Adrian used the pronouns he and him, so I will call him that, but I suspect Adrian might have had more freedom and more options as to how he self-identified in school were he growing up today. His peers, his teachers, his family all understood that Adrian was female, despite his birth designation. Since kindergarten, he had self-selected to be among the girls – socially, athletically, academically. He was one of our girls. And although he got support and acceptance at the school, I don’t know that I helped him as much as I could, or that I tried to understand his needs and his journey. At that time in my life, I didn’t have the experience, the vocabulary, or frankly the emotional capacity to have that conversation. When we broke into social skills groups, for instance, boys apart from girls, he came into my group with the boys, I think because he felt it was required, but I feel like I missed the opportunity to sit with him and ask him what he wanted. And to assure him it was okay, whichever choice he made. I learned more from Adrian than I taught him. Twenty years later, Alex Fierro is for Adrian.

I think about Jane (pseudonym), another one of my students who was a straight cis-female with two fantastic moms. Again, for LGBTQ families, San Francisco was a pretty good place to live in the 90s, but as we know, prejudice has no geographical border. You cannot build a wall high enough to keep it out. I know Jane got flack about her family. I did what I could to support her, but I don’t think I did enough. I remember the day Jane’s drama class was happening in my classroom. The teacher was new – our first African American male teacher, which we were all really excited about – and this was only his third week. I was sitting at my desk, grading papers, while the teacher did a free association exercise. One of his examples was ‘fruit – gay.’ I think he did it because he thought it would be funny to middle schoolers. After the class, I asked to see the teacher one on one. I asked him to be aware of what he was saying and how that might be hurtful. I know. Me, a white guy, lecturing this Black teacher about hurtful words. He got defensive and quit, because he said he could not promise to not use that language again. At the time, I felt like I needed to do something, to stand up especially for Jane and her family. But did I make things better handling it as I did? I think I missed an opportunity to open a dialogue about how different people experience hurtful labels. Emmie and Josephine and their daughter Georgina, the family I introduce in The Dark Prophecy, are for Jane.

I think about Amy, and Mark, and Nicholas … All former students who have come out as gay since I taught them in middle school. All have gone on to have successful careers and happy families. When I taught them, I knew they were different. Their struggles were greater, their perspectives more divergent than some of my other students. I tried to provide a safe space for them, to model respect, but in retrospect I don’t think I supported them as well as I could have, or reached out as much as they might have needed. I was too busy preparing lessons on Shakespeare or adjectives, and not focusing enough on my students’ emotional health. Adjectives were a lot easier for me to reconcile than feelings. Would they have felt comfortable coming out earlier than college or high school if they had found more support in middle school? Would they have wanted to? I don’t know. But I don’t think they felt it was a safe option, which leaves me thinking that I did not do enough for them at that critical middle school time. I do not want any kid to feel alone, invisible, misunderstood. Nico di Angelo is for Amy, and Mark and Nicholas.

I am trying to do more. Percy Jackson started as a way to empower kids, in particular my son, who had learning differences. As my platform grew, I felt obliged to use it to empower all kids who are struggling through middle school for whatever reason. I don’t always do enough. I don’t always get it right. Good intentions are wonderful things, but at the end of a manuscript, the text has to stand on its own. What I meant ceases to matter. Kids just see what I wrote. But I have to keep trying. My kids are counting on me.

So thank you, above all, to my former students who taught me. Alex Fierro is for you.

To you, I pledge myself to do better – to apologize when I screw up, to learn from my mistakes, to be there for LGBTQ youth and make sure they know that in my books, they are included. They matter. I am going to stop talking now, but I promise you I won’t stop listening.

—  Rick Riordan’s speech in June 26, 2017 for The Stonewall Award
American Library Association meeting in Chicago for the book Magnus Chase 2: The Hammer of Thor that won the children’s book award for “exceptional merit relating to the gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender experience” because of the character of Alex Fierro.

Imagine meeting your son. (Part D)

A/N: Part 5D 😊 “I want a baby now,” says the girl who always said she didn’t want kids. Look what you did, Chris. You can read the related mini-series and the previous parts here: (Mini-series: ‘Perfect’ - Masterlist; Mini-series Spin-off: ‘Fated’ - Masterlist; Chapter 7: ‘Baby Steps’: Part 1/Part 2/Part 3A/3B/Part 4A/4B/4C/4D/Part 5A/5B/5C)

After giving you some time with Jack, the nurses took him to the nursery. There were tests, vaccines, and paperwork to be given and completed, and you also needed your rest. They made sure to tie ID bands around yours and Chris’ wrists, as well as Jack’s ankle before they left with him so your son wouldn’t get lost amongst the other babies- which was an irrational fear of yours. You were sure you could pull your special little guy out from the rest of the ordinary crop, but it didn’t hurt to have a little extra precaution. Surprisingly, Chris stayed with you instead of going with Jack. He sent the grandparents instead, stating “I could use some alone time with my wife.” You appreciated the sweet notion, but you told him you were just going to take a nap and that he was more than welcome to go see Jack. But he shook his head, kissing the back of your hand. “I’m going to be here when you wake up,” he assured you as you drifted off to sleep.

And he was, Chris was still by your side when you woke after forty minutes of undisturbed sleep. It didn’t seem like a lot, but it did wonders for your sanity. “I’m surprised you’re still here,” you smiled at Chris when you saw him smile at you.

“Why’s that?” He asked, rubbing his right eye with the side of his index finger.

“I just thought you’d be with Jack.” You said and glanced at the clock; it was 6:46PM, concluding a long, long twenty-four hours for the both of you. Since yesterday at exactly 6:46PM, you’d been suffering from what you’d thought were Braxton Hicks. You didn’t sleep well, which meant Chris didn’t either. So it was understandable he was now as exhausted as you were, probably needing his own forty minutes of undisturbed sleep. “You waited almost thirty-nine years for him, I figured now that he’s here- you’d be glued to his side.”

“I’m kind of already glued to your side, the girl I waited almost thirty-six years for.” He said and you smiled when he took your hand in his. “I told you, you’re my priority. Nothing, not even Jack’s arrival is going to change that.” He squeezed your hand and you squeezed back. “It’s you and me against the world, kid.”

“Will you stop calling me ‘kid’ now that I have my own kid?”

“No chance, kid,” he winked and you chuckled softly, shaking your head.

“Knock knock,” a familiar voice interrupted the moment you and Chris were having, bringing both your gazes to the door. You both smiled when you saw Robert enter the room with a bouquet of hydrangeas and a teddy bear dressed like Captain America that you couldn’t see because it was hidden behind his back. “Sorry to disturb. I couldn’t help myself after getting Chris’ text, I gotta meet the newest addition to the Marvel family.”

“No, not at all. We’re very happy to see you,” you told him and he smiled, walking over. “The Winter Soldier and his missus might be a little sore knowing you met their godson before them,” you joked, knowing that was exactly what Robert was going to do, “so let’s not boast about it on the group chat.”

“Got it,” Robert winked, making you and Chris laugh as he passed Chris the bouquet; Chris placed the bouquet on your bedside table. “These are from Susan, she sends her regards. She would’ve loved to come along to meet your child, but she’s caught up with our own.”

“Don’t even worry about it, honestly I didn’t even expect you to drive all the way out here,” Chris told him then laughed at Robert’s expression of disbelief. Of course he was going to drive out to meet Chris Evans’ son, he would’ve taken a plane from the other side of the world to meet Jack. “We’ll come down with Jack one day and we can have dinner together.”

“That sounds good,” Robert nodded. “Anyway, this-” he moved the teddy bear out from behind his back, waving at the both of you with the hand of the bear. You and Chris laughed because that was the last gift you expected from Iron Man himself. “This is from me. I wanted to get an Iron Man one,” he explained as if he could read your minds, “but Susan said no.”

“That’s ‘cause Susan knows I would’ve burned that at the stake,” Chris joked.

“You’re just upset ‘cause you know Jack is going to be on Team Iron Man,” Robert smirked.

“Over my dead body, Stark,” Chris quipped, laughing when Robert did; you rolled your eyes. “Seriously. Thanks for coming, man.” Chris rose to his feet and took the bear Robert held out, then shared a hug with him. “We really appreciate it.” You nodded, smiling at Robert. “Jack’s in the nursery at the moment, you can meet him in a bit.”

Chris sat back down after pulling a chair over for Robert. “We’re all so happy for the both of you, “ Robert said as he sat down, “this is amazing. You’re a dad,” he slapped Chris’ shoulder with a wide grin; Chris mirrored the same grin, chuckling softly. “Finally, man. You must be ecstatic.”

“Ecstatic, yeah, but also nervous.” He admitted then winced when he looked up at you. “Sorry, baby. I know I’m meant to be the rock here, but I am nervous.” He told you and a soft snicker escaped your nostrils because you already knew that. “You’re a dad of many,” he turned back to Robert, “have got any advice for me?”

“Just be yourself,” Robert replied with a shrug. “Don’t try to be the perfect parent because they don’t exist. Just be yourself,” he repeated in a more assertive tone. “Don’t be afraid to make mistakes because that’s how you learn. Every kid is different, there is no handbook. The main idea is to love them and raise them to make good choices and be a decent human being. It’s just- it’s something you just gotta work at it. It’s a lot of try and try again, and taking each day as it comes. You have to believe that things will work out in the end, and it will, trust me.”

“That’s the best you got?” Chris laughed.

“What do you want me to say, Evans?” Robert quizzed, smiling. “Parenthood- it’s both the easiest and the toughest job on the planet. I can’t tell you how to be a dad to Jack, that’s something you’ve got to work out on your own.” Robert told him and Chris managed a small smile, reaching for your hand because you always provided him comfort. “Just relax, Dorito. You’re made for this. And come on, that kid is equal parts you and Y/N,” he smiled at you and you smiled back, “whatever the two of you do or don’t do, he’s going to turn out great anyway.”

“Thank you, that is so sweet,” you cooed, pouting as your eyes welled with tears.

“Just stating facts here,” Robert smiled, reaching for your joined hands to give it a light pat.

Chris drew his hand back and turned to the door when he heard his mom’s voice. He smiled when he realized the grandparents had returned with Jack; your mom was wheeling him in his little baby cot. “Look who’s here,” he glanced at you and tapped Robert’s arm. You smiled, feeling a spark of excitement that ignited a want to hold your little boy. “Is everything okay with him?” He asked your mom as he carefully lifted Jack from his cot, cradling him in his arms. “Hey pal,” he gently rocked Jack, walking over to Robert.

“Everything’s perfect, the two of you should be able to go home tomorrow morning.” Your mom told Chris, then looked over and smiled at you. “I’m proud of you, baby,” she mouthed and you wiped the tears from your eyes, smiling. “Hey Robert, it’s nice of you to join the party.”

“I had to meet the next Captain America,” Robert gently rubbed Jack’s belly with the pads of his fingers, smiling. “Little one, you have no idea how long your dad has waited for you.” He told Jack as Chris passed him over. “He’s beautiful, you guys.” He smiled at both you and Chris before turning back to Jack. “You are going to be so loved by your mom and dad, and all your aunties and uncles at Marvel. So loved,” he asserted, pressing a gentle kiss on Jack’s forehead.

Chris rejoined your side, sitting on the edge of your bed this time. He wrapped an arm around you as you leaned into him, watching Robert interact with Jack. Jack, your son. It still blew your mind that you were a parent now. Were you ready for this? Was Chris? Of course he was, he was a natural with kids. But were you? Were you-

You were thrown off your train of thought when Jack started to cry, your heart both ached and started to beat rapidly against your chest. Your son was crying and Robert was bringing him over to the two of you. Could you even soothe him? What if he didn’t stop crying at your touch? Would that make you a bad mom?

“I think he wants his mom,” Robert told you, transferring Jack into your arms. Chris helped as you took him, your eyes slightly narrowed with stress and anxiety. “Well, look at that. I was right,” Robert commented when Jack stopped crying at your touch, nestling himself in your comfort. “And you said you weren’t a natural,” Robert teased you.

Your facials softened and you let out a breathless chuckle, smiling at Chris before looking back down at your son. Chris smiled and kissed the side of your head, whispering into your ear before he drew back, “looks like Jack is going to be just like his dad, a big ol’ mama’s boy.”

Tags: @chrisevans-imagines @widowsfics @m-a-t-91 @imaginesofdreams  @katiew1973 @winter-tospring @shamvictoria11 @soymikael @faye22 @always-an-evans-addict @heartblackerthancoffee @whenyourealizethisisntagoodname @yourtropegirl @smoothdogsgirl @createdbytinyaddiction @dreamingintheimpalawithdean @rileyloves5 @buckys-shield @catch-me-im-a-falling-star @tabi-toast @ssweet-empowerment @chrixa @feelmyroarrrr @akidura79 @castellandiangelo @edward-lover18 @yourenotrogers @im-a-fandom-slut @royalexperiment256 @palaiasaurus64 @tacohead13 @badassbaker @pegasusdragontiger @sfreeborn @dorisagent101 @aekr @imagine-cats96 @adeptkillsyasse @shliic @justanotherfangurlz @winchesterandpie @creativeheartgemini @camerica96 @thestarlighthotel @lilya-petrichor @pinkleopardss @lizzysugar @bywonater @avengingalec @nerdingoutismylife @rayleyanns @captainxamerica @lapetitsyrene @01asianista @alwayshave-faith @southernbellestatues @thegirlwiththeimpala @callie-swagg1 @what-if-wenevermet @hillrich


Epilogue

anonymous asked:

Okay so it's the 10 year time skip, except everyone is safe and happy and alive. How would the boys be as dads?

OH HOORAY does………..does ignis still have to be blind pl ease let Safe and Happy  mean Not Blind

Noctis: He’s a bit of an awkward dad, but well-meaning in everything he does. He never imagined parenting would be such a daunting task, and his respect for his father nearly doubles. (Noctis would definitely tell them stories of how cool their grandpa was.) He does his absolute best to be the perfect father figure, making as much time for his child as possible and taking them out to go fishing and letting them ride on his shoulders. He would be extremely protective of his child and do his best to keep them away from danger. After being raised as a war prince, he would want his child to be raised in an environment free of violence and grief and live a normal life. Definitely the type to remember all of his child’s little quirks; the order they eat their food, what stuffed animals they’d like at the aquarium…

Ignis: He’d never thought much of having children, as he always figured he wouldn’t ever have the time to look out for another kid other than Noct. However, given enough time to adjust, he’d definitely be a very doting and responsible father. He makes sure to teach them the most proper of manners, and keep them safe, comfortable, and educated to the best of his ability. The only problem is that while he’s good at keeping them very upright, he gets a bit stuck in the “having fun” department, which is where the others would come in (in which Prompto claims he’s the “fun uncle”. Uncle Gladdy disagrees.) to help the kid loosen up. Ignis would probably brag to the others about how adorable his child is without even realizing it. 

Gladio: Above all else, Gladio would want his child to develop a good mindset and strong character at an early age, to keep their heart steady and in the right place by the time they grow up. He probably gives them lots of talks about what being a good person means, but he would definitely be a dad who encourages his child to do all sorts of new things. He’d support them wholeheartedly in whatever they invest themselves in, but he’d also be the annoying dad who yells and ends up crying at all his kid’s important events, whether it be sports or music recitals. His child is his living legacy, and there isn’t a moment he isn’t proud to be their father. He considers them the biggest blessing of his life, and god help anyone who decides to treat them wrong.

Prompto: Prompto’s always been quite good with kids, but he learns that actually raising one is different than just looking after one. He constantly worries that he’s not good enough a father figure for his lovely child, but he does his best to spend as much time with them as he can and read them bedtime stories every night (he’s the best at doing different voices for all the characters). He’d definitely document their growth with a picture every day, and soon his living space would just be filled with pictures of his child and he’d gush to the others about them and fill up several albums’ worth of his child throughout the years. Prompto would probably be the most heartbroken when his child tells them they’ve grown out of something. “But Daddy thinks you’re never too old for photos!” 

anonymous asked:

So what are your feelings on the ace discourse now that you're realizing you might not be asexual? I know one of the biggest reasons people don't want ace education is because of other LGBT+ kids using it was a way to not have to accept their true sexuality

I’ve always hated that argument and I hate it even more now that I’ve been through it.

Stop using internalized homophobia and internalized transphobia to justify denying people learning about their identities. If a kid is going to use a different label to deny their internalized homophobia/transphobia, they isn’t anyone’s fault but The Straights™ and their heteronormativity. 

Easter Eggs and Pink Bandanas

This was inspired by this post and a conversation with @qinaliel and I regret nothing.  


Jon rushed around his bedroom, jumping over toys, trying to finish getting ready.  He could hear Sansa shouting up to him.   He finished tying his tie and hurried downstairs.

When he landed at the bottom of the stairs, he couldn’t help but laugh.  

Sansa had tied bright pink bandanas with little eggs on them around their dogs’ necks.  Their German Shepherd, Lady, sat regally, as though she was posing for a portrait. Next to her lay Ghost, their Husky mix.  He seemed to be looking up at Jon, silently pleading.  

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